BWO, and Brown Dun

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Thank you. I'm keeping a list of of what I find and sticking dated pictures in books. It's strange but I just have not come up with mayfly nymphs when I collect. If my grandson wants to go this afternoon I think we'll go to the creek and put in a screen and shake some bushes.
Add: I found this specimen Sunday. Looking at troutnut.com, and the weather site, I think these would have come out Saturday?, AM drizzle with PM clouds/sun, about 40 degrees air after 3 warm days.
 
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zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
Hi MGTom-

Although it closely resembles the coloration of a Brown Dun, it appears to have minute hind wings, whereas a Brown Dun of genus Ameletus would have quite large hind wings. I believe this female subimago is more likely to be Baetis tricaudatus.
So.... for the layman... a BWO. Tom, was this a little one or a big one. Our western BWOs can be bigger ones.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
So.... for the layman... a BWO. Tom, was this a little one or a big one. Our western BWOs can be bigger ones.
Thanks for the help. I figure it would be worth carrying some nymphs for winter. I usually carry a box of stones and hare's ear's for caddis (might be close enough). Maybe add some PT's. However this creek system is closed in winter, and the ones further east? I haven't seen them but they are probably there, I should look closer since I'm doing more trout fishing than steelheading.
Found lots of good information using the site search now that I'm pointed in the right direction, thx folks. I think I've encountered them other times.
 
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MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
These two were on the back porch this morning. I think these are the same. I just don't have the eye for it. But I do have an idea of what fly I would use. 20210415_111517.jpg 20210415_082243.jpg
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Ameletus?

Thx, pilot rocks only an hour south and very similar terrain so that would be a quite logical choice.
The more I look the more difference I see.
But both are probably why the hare's ear had been good in the river before it closed.
 
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MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
So, to put my observations to work, I headed out after correcting and returning a bunch of math homework east along the route Lewis and Clark took home
20210415_174214.jpg
I chose to fish with the redington classic trout I picked up a while back, along with a box of wet flies including some March Browns
20210415_151755 (2).jpg
and while that imitation did well with the fish that had been in the lake a while
20210415_163938 (2).jpg a coachman wet took a small one almost every cast
20210415_165417 (2).jpg
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
I saw these hatching on the middle fork of the Snoqualmie, last weekend. They were quite big. I figured they were ameletus, too. The ones I saw were at least size 12.

@Taxon, can you clarify your earlier post? Are these ameletus or baetis? If they are in fact baetis, should the chart be updated? The size range says 16-24.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I believe the bug in the first image was a BWO, then the pair a month later are the brown duns. At first they all the same to me.
 

Taxon

WFF Moderator
@Taxon, can you clarify your earlier post? Are these ameletus or baetis? If they are in fact baetis, should the chart be updated? The size range says 16-24.
As MGTom just suggested, I believe the first image posted was a Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), and the two images taken a month later are Brown Duns genus Ameletus.
 

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