Youtube Spot Burner

Chris54

Active Member
They are not my spots, they are all of our spots, i am not against sharing. But sharing in a public forum like youtube to increase views and ad revenues and not caring about what that does to fragile wild fish fisheries like he has done on his channel is disgusting and wrong. I don't even mind that he shares the name of the stream but spoonfeeding exact location specifics in a public forum has consequences. To think that it won't is naive. Have you seen what the pandemic has done to increase new angler numbers, fishing license sales and the sales of outdoor gear across the country? The numbers are huge.... Coming to a stream near you soon.
If the stream is so fragile. Why are you or anybody else fishing it? Why do you get to fish the fragile stream and when some one else fish’s it. Then it becomes a problem. Since you got to experience that majestic spot for so long let the YouTuber have it. You can go fish some other place to protect the fragile echo system. This is America we should all have the right to enjoy the sport you do. Because you started fly fishing before the masses you think your entitled to special spots. If the numbers are huge. Give up the sport and let your fellow Americans enjoy the sport. It’s the noble thing to do.
 

chromefinder

Active Member
If the stream is so fragile. Why are you or anybody else fishing it? Why do you get to fish the fragile stream and when some one else fish’s it. Then it becomes a problem. Since you got to experience that majestic spot for so long let the YouTuber have it. You can go fish some other place to protect the fragile echo system. This is America we should all have the right to enjoy the sport you do. Because you started fly fishing before the masses you think your entitled to special spots. If the numbers are huge. Give up the sport and let your fellow Americans enjoy the sport. It’s the noble thing to do.
Chris54, i have not said that these are my special spots or that the public or anyone doesn't have a right to fish it. I'm 100% for public access. after reading your comment though I do certainly hope that a popular flyshop with 50 guides and several popular IG influencer gobro types comes into your favorite waters and pimps the heck out of them like no tomorrow. Enjoy your day!!!
 

CreekScrambler

Active Member
YouTubing a trip to a superabundant destination fishery that currently has a lot of pressure and handles it fine is no big deal.

Spoon feeding the unwashed masses a small, cherished, lightly-pressured location is shooting yourself in the foot and potentially dooming the river to a future of overfishing. I have exactly one fishing buddy, and he doesn’t have any other fishing buddies. I’ll take him to any place that I find or have found and happily share a day there. I’ll chat with any of you streamside, swap flies, and bs about good spots on the river.

Much as I enjoy the forum, I’m not gonna generate a Google-searchable posting on any location that I enjoy. I’ve seen a favorite backpacking location morph in a few years from a busy, scenic place with a fun bunch of people soaking in the glory to an Instagram brothel complete with photography crews and ‘talent’. I’m not taking the bait with fishing places new and old that I love. Call me Scrooge McDuck and I’ll live with it.
 

Chris54

Active Member
Chris54, i have not said that these are my special spots or that the public or anyone doesn't have a right to fish it. I'm 100% for public access. after reading your comment though I do certainly hope that a popular flyshop with 50 guides and several popular IG influencer gobro types comes into your favorite waters and pimps the heck out of them like no tomorrow. Enjoy your day!!!
They do. Come down to the Fall River in Oregon. Sometimes it crazy. I just go somewhere else for the day.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I've been an over poster in the past. I love to share where I've been and what I learned. And I like it when others do the same, that's how I learn. But after listening to everybody's conversations for the last year I've figured it's better to be a bit discreet. As always, working to find balance.
 

chromefinder

Active Member
Well if the guides are fishing it it isn't a secret spot. Do you ever wonder what the other people are thinking when they see you fishing there.... ( hey some asshole is fishing MY secret spot )

Well if the guides are fishing it it isn't a secret spot. Do you ever wonder what the other people are thinking when they see you fishing there.... ( hey some asshole is fishing MY secret spot )
okay then so your also good the IG influencers or yourtubers who are getting paid to promote fly fishing products to come into your favorite public waters / spots and tell several thousand anglers where when and exactly what rock to fish behind? I hope you enjoy the experience as new angler and boater numbers continue to grow!
 
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candr

Active Member
The great thing about a lot of people is that they have very short attention spans. Flyfishing, flytying and outdoor pursuits in general appear to be experiencing a lot of new interest over the past year. I guarantee when we are through this pandemic interest will dwindle. Hopefully the people who are interested in all the great things that go along with enjoying the outdoors - particularly conservation, will stay.
It is my experience that both the bros who post the spots and those who cruise the internet looking for the spots are always temporary - they are always looking for, not only the next best spot, but also their next new hobby. They may come to your spot a few times but they will move on and eventually disappear. There are a lot of activities out there that need high quality drone footage posted on youtube to generate more likes for "content creators". Please subscribe and click the bell so you get instant notification when I post something......
 

East Coaster

Active Member
I'm not familiar with exactly how people earn money on Youtube, other than to guess that the channel has sponsors and they pay the channel owner based on the number of views or likes or subscribers. One thing you could do is post the sponsors (if that info is available) and encourage people to contact those sponsors and let them know that you will not be giving them your business if they continue to support that channel owner. If the number of people willing to contact sponsors gets their attention, my guess is they will pull sponsorship (I doubt they'd bother trying to influence content). If the income stream isn't there, maybe the incentive to post will wane. Just a thought.....
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
I'm just trying to figure out if the kumbaya crew sharing everything has more go pros, social media influencer platinum level accounts, or participation trophies?

I fish some sensitive areas. I've taken people to these areas in the past. I've been burned. I'll never fish with that person again in any sort of spot requiring discretion if at all. I loath loudmouths who kiss and tell. This is purely an ego thing. Social media has turned people into narcissistic idiots seeking that red like number. The psychology behind it is simple and speaks to a need for validation. I understand why people want to be internet famous. Sometimes it's money, more often it's a "look at me" thing. I mean isn't that what 90% of social media is all about? If people really look honestly and deeply at why they want to post YouTube stuff ect about fishing they will find it's the same as that one guy in the bar that always wants to give the skinny on the bad ass hunting and fishing spots. It's cause he wants to be cool. Difference is only a couple people hear that drunk who doesn't much fish anymore anyway. Writers are not immune. Some of the most egotistical burn your spot assholes I know are well known sporting publication columnists. They say they like to help people but it's really the recognition and mastrubation of the ego that's the motivation behind their actions. And like all things you need fresh fodder for the magazine or YouTube channel to keep it fresh, relevant, hip, and cool. So while this guy will move on to other places to burn his videos ect are up in perpetuity for all to see. Maybe he'll start guiding soon as his ego will require more. Of course his girl will have to get a job to keep the lights on.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
IMHO it is extremely naive to think that hot spotting or “spot burning” on a You Tube video or other social media post is going to drive angler usage of that spot over and above what is normal.

Why! Because there are no secret places. For Example: The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has a FishMT app that maps every fishable stream/lake in MT, lists species present, survey data, access, historic angler pressure and includes photos of the waterbody. Where are the secrets? I can cite dozens of published guides listing all the waters in Montana and Yellowstone in infinite detail. Other states have similar directories both in print and online. Social media might seem to be the only place where people get their info, but that is far from reality.
I don't like YT hot-spotting but will pass on good fishing opportunities to friends who I believe will care for them and use discretion to keep my recommendations to themselves. However this post got me thinking.

Is YouTube today's "bookshelf"? I paid for and wore out at least two editions of Bob and Ira Springs' 101 Hikes in the North-Central-South Cascades books and heavily used all 3 volumes of Fred Beckey's Cascade Alpine Guides. I have Greg Thomas' Flyfisher's Guide to Washington, Gary Huber's Flyfisher's Guide to Oregon, Doug Rose's Fly Fishing the Olympic Peninsula. I have two other fly fishing guide books that get so much use I've had them spiral bound because key pages were coming out. There was-is lots of info in those books that prepared me for successful trips. They all made money off their books and felt good that they sold a lot of copies. Were they hot-spotting?
 
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chromefinder

Active Member
I don't like YT hot-spotting but will pass on good fishing opportunities to friends who I believe will care for them and use discretion to keep my recommendations to themselves. However this post got me thinking.

Is YouTube today's "bookshelf"? I paid for and wore out at least two editions of Bob and Ira Springs' 101 Hikes in the North-Central-South Cascades books and heavily used all 3 volumes of Fred Becky's Cascade Alpine Guides. I have Greg Thomas' Flyfisher's Guide to Washington, Gary Huber's Flyfisher's Guide to Oregon, Doug Rose's Fly Fishing the Olympic Peninsula. I have two other fly fishing guide books that have had so much use I've had them spiral bound because pages were coming out. There was lots of info in those books that prepared me for successful trips. They all made money off their books and felt good that they sold a lot of copies. Were they hot-spotting?

IMO yes, also keep in mind that youtube has 2.3 billion users
 

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