Youtube Spot Burner

Mike.Cline

Bozeman, Montana
I like the graph above. Wouldn’t be fun to plot all your favorite places on the chart but then you couldn’t share it with anyone.

I don’t mind sharing my favorite places. People rarely listen to me anyway. I got to fish yesterday for the first time this season. An icebreaker so to speak. I went to a favorite hotspot: N 45.36110 W 110.72922 which is just about .43 miles south of the access point. I’ve fished, written and spoken about this spot for the last decade, but I’m always alone when I am fishing it. Generally 3-4 times pre-runoff and 2-3 times in the Fall. It is a tough spot to get to but I manage. Doesn’t fish well from the East side of the river because of the tall riprap bank and essentially no room for long casts. The west side is shallow and provides excellent wading access to at least 400 yards of very productive water. Those anglers that I see floating the river blow right by because its so close to the access point. In the last decade I’ve never encountered another angler on the west side.

Yesterday, despite still being cold and lots of shelf ice still around, 3.5 hours of mid-day angling produced a dozen fish and a Yellowstone slam—Cuttybrownrainbowwhitey.

I wonder where this hotspot would fall on the graph.
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jreising326

Active Member
I like the graph and will say while remote, the place that the person Hot Spotted that drew my Ire would be in the Yellow. It's purely a wild trout fishery, one of the most beautiful rivers I've ever fished, but you can buy maps and read plenty of books about it. It's also not my secret spot, he won't easily find some/most/any of them.

He is however trying to develop a following, probably mostly newbies, and is spoon-feeding location, technique, fly selection, glory shots where he must have held the fish in the net until his fishing buddy can get a camera in position to film the underwater "release" of the fish, etc. All while he talks to the camera "This is a 14" wild fish, got this one on The Shop Vac Fly". He is literally doing that with every fish he lands, big or small.

So it's probably more of an element of disrespect and/or lack of discretion that bothers me, than the cardinal sin of "Zipper Lip Central" Sport Burning.

That coupled with eliminating the barrier of entry that most of us all had to overcome learning how to fish well bothers me. The trial and error is also part of the sport and should be enjoyed. Not to mention the droves of new anglers I'm expecting to see this season. If he was focusing on Put and Take fisheries I'd feel differently. I can't tell you how many dead wild fish I encountered last year from what I assume is improper handling/playing in the warmer part of the season.

Maybe I should have titled this "Paint by Number Spoonfeeding for the Masses and Wild Trout Streams"
 

Chris54

Active Member
I like the graph above. Wouldn’t be fun to plot all your favorite places on the chart but then you couldn’t share it with anyone.

I don’t mind sharing my favorite places. People rarely listen to me anyway. I got to fish yesterday for the first time this season. An icebreaker so to speak. I went to a favorite hotspot: N 45.36110 W 110.72922 which is just about .43 miles south of the access point. I’ve fished, written and spoken about this spot for the last decade, but I’m always alone when I am fishing it. Generally 3-4 times pre-runoff and 2-3 times in the Fall. It is a tough spot to get to but I manage. Doesn’t fish well from the East side of the river because of the tall riprap bank and essentially no room for long casts. The west side is shallow and provides excellent wading access to at least 400 yards of very productive water. Those anglers that I see floating the river blow right by because its so close to the access point. In the last decade I’ve never encountered another angler on the west side.

Yesterday, despite still being cold and lots of shelf ice still around, 3.5 hours of mid-day angling produced a dozen fish and a Yellowstone slam—Cuttybrownrainbowwhitey.

I wonder where this hotspot would fall on the graph.
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I got a spot that’s the exact opposite. New born infants know this place. But on the right cold ass day when the stars align you get it all to your self.
 

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LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Supporter
Why is it bad Etiquette? Someone is sharing a good fishing spot with someone else and we call that bad etiquette. I see it the other way around. Sounds like selfishness too me. This might be a generational thing but someone that’s helping other people catch fish and find a good spots is fine by me. Use it to your advantage and find someone else’s good spot on YouTube. You are of course watching the videos.
Nobody wants assholes or hordes in their favorite spots, but there’s an assumption here that people who find “your spot” aren’t good stewards (are you?)
Maybe the answer is to educate the next generation to respect the fisheries. Pass the torch. If you really think you have a right to any secret spot that’s called entitlement. Nobody owns any spots on public land.
 

LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Supporter
They are not my spots, they are all of our spots, i am not against sharing. But sharing in a public forum like youtube to increase views and ad revenues and not caring about what that does to fragile wild fish fisheries like he has done on his channel is disgusting and wrong. I don't even mind that he shares the name of the stream but spoonfeeding exact location specifics in a public forum has consequences. To think that it won't is naive. Have you seen what the pandemic has done to increase new angler numbers, fishing license sales and the sales of outdoor gear across the country? The numbers are huge.... Coming to a stream near you soon.
Are you seriously saying that fishing license sales being up is a BAD thing? Check where that money goes.
 

LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Supporter
I also want to say I don't want to discourage anyone who disagrees with my view of this topic. In fact that's why I started the post in the first place. Surfnsully also made in point in the post above, about meeting people and discovering new "spots". I think that's another reason I don't like Spot Burning, because there usually is no relationship made, and I fear many of the folks this stuff attracts won't respect these places as much as they deserve. Full disclosure I'm 55 years old, and if I were just starting out and in my 20's I might look at it differently. I've met and made many friends over the years out fishing solo, that became fishing buddies. I guess to me that's how it should be done.
I like that you can see both perspectives at once. Like you I’ve ventured solo to many spots and made great friends doing so.
The generational gap needs to be bridged and I think we should fund projects that teach good stewardship and etiquette to youth.
 

East Coaster

Active Member
Nobody wants assholes or hordes in their favorite spots, but there’s an assumption here that people who find “your spot” aren’t good stewards (are you?)
This is the crux of the issue with hot-spotting. Someone who has put the time and effort to find a good spot will likely be a good steward. They probably visited many less desirable places before they found a gem, and will have an appreciation for its rarity and value. That experience gives them a vested interest in seeing the place maintained, and they aren't as likely to trash it or to mistreat the resource.

Someone who shows up at a place because they read or saw videos on-line, has a lot less invested. It came to them cheaply and therefore its value may not be appreciated. Does this apply to everyone? Of course not, but the more people there are who are getting things cheaply, the more likely that some will treat it like a disposable item - use it once and throw it in the trash without another thought.
 

jreising326

Active Member
Yeah, East Coaster is hitting on the same point/nerve that concerns me. It's the need for "instant gratification" and elimination of the barrier of entry and in my opinion the reward of the investment of your time. I live in NorCal, so another big reason for my concern is seeing what happened last summer. We have huge population centers down south, and people came here/moved here in droves and pummeled the Blue Ribbon/Special Reg fisheries. Now the DFG in their infinite wisdom is opening up these special reg waters year round.

When I head out to fish my local Steelhead water, where frankly the conditions have been rapidly declining at an unprecedented rate the last 4 or 5 seasons, and I see guides in rafts from out of state not even trying to avoid floating over the spot I'm trying to fish, I get a little uppity.

When I take my 16 year old son out on the Upper Sac, which has a ton of easy access and over the course of several outing see wild fish floating belly up, and all/most of the known access area parking lots full, I get concerned about the future. I fear the fisheries will be permanently changed if this continues.

I also fish in Oregon a lot, not last year though, so I don't know if it got as bad as down here. I see people here thinking Fall River in Oregon is crowded. It's not comparable to last summer here. Think Disneyland or god forbid East Coast crowded. I grew up back east, and suspect East Coaster did too, and if you've never had the pleasure of a Pennsylvania Trout Opener you should put it on your Puke Bucket List.
 

chromefinder

Active Member
It never gets crowded here in the Northeastern U.S. :)

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jreising326

Active Member
That's what is happening in NorCal. Pray they don't go over the state line once vaccinated. I get realators calling my home leaving messages once a week asking if I want to sell. Pretty soon I'm going to say yes and go to Oregon. People are telecommuting now and on the run from LA and the Bay Area.
 

jreising326

Active Member
I used to be one of the guys in Chromefinders photos, back in the 80's and 90's. Moved to Norcal in 1996 and would never bother taking a rod back east again. No thanks. Out here many don't realize how good and pristine things (still) are. Back East is a Zoo, and Combat Fishing is the norm.
 

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