Youtube Spot Burner

CreekScrambler

Active Member
I used to be one of the guys in Chromefinders photos, back in the 80's and 90's. Moved to Norcal in 1996 and would never bother taking a rod back east again. No thanks. Out here many don't realize how good and pristine things (still) are. Back East is a Zoo, and Combat Fishing is the norm.
I gave up on fishing hard at Valley Forge when I realized that I was busting my hump for a shot at 8-10” overfished browns. Population density is the bane of quality fishing everywhere.
 

jreising326

Active Member
My last comment on his photo is ask yourself what happens when 1 of those guys actually hooks a Salmon? Yep, 10 other guys are also hooked up on the same fish and the ones that care might reel in their lines and get out of the way. I remember one guy casting over 10 or more anglers lines just to tangle them up on purpose so his buddies would fish undisturbed for 5 or 10 minutes while everyone else as tangled up. NY'er's are wonderfully creative.
 

chromefinder

Active Member
That's what is happening in NorCal. Pray they don't go over the state line once vaccinated. I get realators calling my home leaving messages once a week asking if I want to sell. Pretty soon I'm going to say yes and go to Oregon. People are telecommuting now and on the run from LA and the Bay Area.

I gave up on fishing hard at Valley Forge when I realized that I was busting my hump for a shot at 8-10” overfished browns. Population density is the bane of quality fishing everywhere.
just about 60 Million people live within a 300 mile radius of the water i posted the pictures from and if i remember correctly is was a weekday.
 

jreising326

Active Member
I lied because I found this on Amazon. This was the "Fly or Choice" for some of those guys in the 1980's and legal at the time. Thankfully they were outlawed in 1990:
1616097194747.png
 

D C Brenna

Member
It’s quite the dilemma. I’m 55 years a fly fisher and have watched a lot happen. I was freaked out by “the movie”. It had a big impact but it also created a more robust community. I don’t do a lot of social media, but now I’m offering casting lessons and people want to know where to fish. I emphasize fly fishing etiquette, honoring a pool and treating fellow anglers with respect. I tell my students that there’s lots of waters and do some research, spend some time hiking and exploring. I really respect what you are trying to do. Good article, too.
 

East Coaster

Active Member
To put this in a little perspective, I'm still here on the east coast, in NJ specifically. NJ is the most densely populated state, with the heaviest concentrations within 50 miles of either NYC or Philadelphia (Ben Franklin is said to have called NJ "a barrel tapped at both ends"). Traditional (moving water) trout fishing is really only available in the northern half of the state, with wild trout found in the upper third (and most of those streams in the western half of the upper third). Needless to say, it can be crowded on our streams. However, you won't ever find me in crowds like those in the pics. I've spent quite a bit of time and effort to find places with wild trout and no one else around, and that's info that I will only share with people I am absolutely sure would not pass it along to anyone else. And the couple of places that were shared with me are ones that I won't share under any circumstance - that was the unspoken understanding in having that info given to me (I actually have never asked anyone for their spots). Maybe it sounds extreme, but look at those pics and remember, I'm not seeing anything like that where I fish.....
 

Saltycutthroat

WFF Supporter
It never gets crowded here in the Northeastern U.S. :)

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Why would anyone put up with that?
 

jreising326

Active Member
I totally related to "The Movie" and we are the same age DC. The problem at the moment though, because things have changed so much since the 90's, is the Fly Shops, Guides, and the "Good People" are getting cut out completely. I see posts from the owners of Fly Shops desperately pointing this out. They aren't getting the benefit, the new anglers are all just wanting the fastest path to the best waters. The Youtuber I'm talking about is pimping Mail Order Gear and trying to capitalize/monetize the current situation. Sure he's just trying to make a buck, and on some level that's fine, but not at my expense. I don't like it at all when I think about it that way and think back those crowds from my East Coast Days.

East Coaster, if you've never been out here before and somehow find your way to NorCal, drop me a line. I'll take you a few places that will blow your mind, any month of the year. There's always something special going on, somewhere! :)
 

jreising326

Active Member
Salty, because they have no choice and have never been out west. Don't think it can't/won't happen places out here, it will eventually. The East Coast is essentially 400 years older than the west coast and the density is unreal compared to out here. The major Metros are all close together and anglers will drive hours to stand elbow to elbow in hopes of catching a hatchery Salmon or Steelhead. In some cases those Great Lake "Rivers" and only a few miles from Lake to Hatchery, so it gets Ugly when the fish come in. They are all hot and aggressive like our fresh wild fish near the coast. Back then that was "normal" Salmon or Steelhead fishing to me. I honestly didn't like it. Some idiot friend talked me into it, but I kept going anyway... :)
 
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LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Supporter
Yeah, East Coaster is hitting on the same point/nerve that concerns me. It's the need for "instant gratification" and elimination of the barrier of entry and in my opinion the reward of the investment of your time. I live in NorCal, so another big reason for my concern is seeing what happened last summer. We have huge population centers down south, and people came here/moved here in droves and pummeled the Blue Ribbon/Special Reg fisheries. Now the DFG in their infinite wisdom is opening up these special reg waters year round.

When I head out to fish my local Steelhead water, where frankly the conditions have been rapidly declining at an unprecedented rate the last 4 or 5 seasons, and I see guides in rafts from out of state not even trying to avoid floating over the spot I'm trying to fish, I get a little uppity.

When I take my 16 year old son out on the Upper Sac, which has a ton of easy access and over the course of several outing see wild fish floating belly up, and all/most of the known access area parking lots full, I get concerned about the future. I fear the fisheries will be permanently changed if this continues.

I also fish in Oregon a lot, not last year though, so I don't know if it got as bad as down here. I see people here thinking Fall River in Oregon is crowded. It's not comparable to last summer here. Think Disneyland or god forbid East Coast crowded. I grew up back east, and suspect East Coaster did too, and if you've never had the pleasure of a Pennsylvania Trout Opener you should put it on your Puke Bucket List.
I hear you. Unfortunately steelhead runs are the first to get overwhelmed. Everyone wants that picture.
This is the crux of the issue with hot-spotting. Someone who has put the time and effort to find a good spot will likely be a good steward. They probably visited many less desirable places before they found a gem, and will have an appreciation for its rarity and value. That experience gives them a vested interest in seeing the place maintained, and they aren't as likely to trash it or to mistreat the resource.

Someone who shows up at a place because they read or saw videos on-line, has a lot less invested. It came to them cheaply and therefore its value may not be appreciated. Does this apply to everyone? Of course not, but the more people there are who are getting things cheaply, the more likely that some will treat it like a disposable item - use it once and throw it in the trash without another thought.
I agree, but not everything that comes cheaply is treated that way. If someone shows me a spot, it’s like a gift that comes with responsibilities.
 
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LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Supporter
That's good, but a gift given to you personally is a lot different than a "gift" given to thousands of strangers on-line.....
Agreed. If you invite someone to join you on a trip to one of your favorite spots, you have the opportunity to instill respect and stewardship to them. I just wish this “gift” was given more often between respectful individuals.
I’ve known some people for years that still won’t reveal spots and won’t share with anyone else either. Mostly younger guys who want “their” lakes just for themselves and their crew. The older guys tend to be more open to sharing, perhaps because they realize that you can’t take your hidey holes with you when you die.
Personally I want the next generation of anglers to be invested in keeping fisheries pristine, caring about conservation, and respecting the entire ecosystem surrounding the riparian habitat. These are values that are best taught from one person to another. Now I’m rambling. :)
 

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