Euro-nerds: difference between 3wt vs 4wt?

jreising326

Active Member
There are 3/4 wt, so basically a 3.5. Honestly any rod with a sensitive tip will do. It is best to try this with any rod first and be sure you enjoy it. I've been fishing a long time and wanted to try something new. I figured I had done tight line nymphing 20+ years ago and this was the same thing with a fancy new name. Well it sort of is, and it sort of isn't, but if you nymph and are tired of using a bobber this can be a fun way to change things up and catch more fish, under certain conditions. Those conditions I'd say are very specific, ideally water with some color that hold a lot of fish. Your not going to be casting 70 ft, more like 15 or even 7. That's where the advantage lies in a true drag free drift, with a direct connection to the fish, and the visual focus on the sighter.

If the fish lie across the stream, an indicator or dry/wet/trout spey is a better choice. I'd spend more money on a trout spey and proper lines than I would on a Euro Rig. Heck, you could use a spinning rod. I considered using a 10ft Great Lakes Noodle Rod I bought in the 80's when I lived back east. It would work, but would be too heavy and unbalanced. Fine to learn the technique though.

You should know pretty quick if this is for you or not. It's a narrow application for certain waters and conditions that will increase catch rate and teach you a few new things about Trout or even some Steelhead (but not on the 3wt).

The guy joking about the 1 wt above, frankly it's not a bad idea for some waters. It would be fun for small fish on a freestone stream!
 

jreising326

Active Member
I would agree with Jaredoconner above, there is no reason to spend $500 on a Euro Rig unless you are intending on entering competitions. Again just go for sensitive tip, balanced, and I should have said fairly light. Your arm will be sore pretty quick high sticking with a heavy unbalanced setup. Fine to learn with, but not enjoyable for more than a hour or two. Balance is more important that weight believe it or not, at least IMHO. The Echo Competition Kit comes with weights you can put in the reel seat and adding weight to balance makes a big difference. Having something like that available for any Euro Rod over $200 would be a requirement in my mind, unless you build your own rod.
 

CreekScrambler

Active Member
Sage and Rio will introduce half weight rods and lines within the next 5 years.
Seems like most lines are already a half-weight heavy to a whole weight heavy. True-to-weight lines are becoming anomalous or marketed as niche/fine presentation products. On top of that, fast-fast rods are essentially a half weight to a whole weight up from their nominal rating. It’s an arms race. A modern 5wt line might fall closer to a 6 and a modern 5wt rod might prefer a 6 or 6.5wt line. Headaches ensue.
 
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Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
Premium
I think for my waters, I don't need anything more than a 3.27 wt lined up with a 3.41 wt line and a 1/2 mono rig, 1/2 sighter with seven tippet rings and 3 micro swivels, 3 droppers tied on 2.1mm beads on 6.3x, 2 droppers tied on 3.22mm beads on 6.7x & a tool fly tied on a 7.2mm bead on 5.6x. Otherwise, you're just wasting time...pretty sure that this is highly classified information.
 
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cervelors

Member
I think for my waters, I don't need anything more than a 3.27 wt lined up with a 3.41 wt line and a 1/2 mono rig, 1/2 sighter with seven tippet rings and 3 micro swivels, 3 droppers tied on 2.1mm beads on 6.3x, 2 droppers tied on 3.22mm beads on 6.7x & a tool fly tied on a 7.2mm bead on 5.6x. Otherwise, you're just wasting time...pretty sure that this is highly classified information.
Hey! Copycat - that‘s what I use!
 

spcoldsmoke

New Member
Has anyone fished enough euro-specific rods to tell the difference between the 3 and 4 weight? Shopping for a dedicated rod, and only a few makers have 4 weight rods. 4's don't seem as popular, but I'm wondering if they might be useful on lower and middle Deschutes, and heavy water sections of the Metolius. I am generally a "use the heaviest gear your can get away with" type of angler.

If anyone spent one of their stimulus checks on the 4wt T&T Contact II, I'd love to hear about your experience with it. I've called a couple shops and they can't keep the 3wt in stock, but don't have a lot of experience with the 4wt.

For euro, I tend to take the opposite approach. What's the lightest gear and tackle I can get away with? A 4 wt may have less sensitivity, but also more weight which can become an issue over a long day. I have the T&T Contact I, 10'8" 3wt and I fully endorse it. Biggest I've landed on that rig is probably 19" and it was fine. Never felt under gunned, and I try to fight fish the way Olsen describes.
 

LyNcH

Steelhead Junkie
My main Euro nymph rod is the 10'6" 3wt Sage ESN II using 4x and 5x fluoro tippet without issue. In anticipation of fishing a much faster river than usual this summer....holding brook trout up to 5lbs and landlocked salmon, I purchased a new 11' 4wt Redington Strike. I did this solely for the purpose of having more backbone and fish fighting power so they can be released quicker. I haven't had a chance to fish it, or both next to each other to compare feel and tip sensitivity, but the reviews for the Strike come back positive at a reasonable cost.
 

Dustin Bise

reformed hot-spotter
I think for my waters, I don't need anything more than a 3.27 wt lined up with a 3.41 wt line and a 1/2 mono rig, 1/2 sighter with seven tippet rings and 3 micro swivels, 3 droppers tied on 2.1mm beads on 6.3x, 2 droppers tied on 3.22mm beads on 6.7x & a tool fly tied on a 7.2mm bead on 5.6x. Otherwise, you're just wasting time...pretty sure that this is highly classified information.
this guy euros
 

jreising326

Active Member
Yeah there's really no reason to label a rod by 1/2 wt other than marketing. Most rods can handle a wt or 2 higher fine. If you get into Switch/Spey and Skagit/Scandi you realize the AFTM Chart isn't a Bible. It's a guideline. I have a few "ill casting" rods that when overlined cast way better than with their rated WF line. Line tapers/bellies also effect this.

For Euro, casting Mono, none of that matters. The funniest thing for me learning Euro was being able to cast a Dry and Dropper Rig using Mono. I couldn't believe it was even possible let alone in some Redneck/Tubetop Fashion "Graceful".
 

DerekWhipple

Active Member
Seems like most lines are already a half-weight heavy to a whole weight heavy. True-to-weight lines are becoming anomalous or marketed as niche/fine presentation products. On top of that, fast-fast rods are essentially a half weight to a whole weight up from their nominal rating. It’s an arms race. A modern 5wt line might fall closer to a 6 and a modern 5wt rod might prefer a 6 or 6.5wt line. Headaches ensue.

I remember when I was just getting started in the early 90's, I'd read books from the library that would recommend all the way up to 7 weight for normal trout fishing.

They should just sell rods by grain weight window. But then again, you wouldn't have to buy 5 different lines to see which one works, so maybe big PVC/PU and their flyline cronies don't want that. Sometimes they are better about suggesting grain weights for each model.
 

DerekWhipple

Active Member
I was curious about 4wt rods and did some research, before I bought my first 3wt. I found a lot of people advising against 4wt rods, for trout. However, I did find some folks recommending them for Great Lakes steelhead or New Zealand.
I e-mailed Devin and that was his answer. He considered the 4wt T&T a New Zealand or euro-streamer/big nymph rod.

The T&T 6wt was designed for steelhead, so I guess that means the 4wt would be for GL "steelhead".
 

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