Info in 1965 Game Fish pamphlet - memory lane

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
My wife is going through some old stuff and found a 1965 Game Fishing pamphlet for WA state. Boy the regs were sure simple (and concise) back then. Things I picked out of the pamphlet. Trout limit was 12 fish, both upper and lower Hampton lakes opened up on April 25th, must have been later that it was revised to the March 1st opener. Nowadays it's back to the late April opener. For each county the local biologist and "game protectors" had their names, mailing addresses (PO Boxes) and phone numbers listed in the book. It appears there once was a fish called a steelhead as there's info about it in the pamphlet. Chopaka had not yet been classified as a fly fishing, no motors lake. Apparently it was somewhere between 1965 and 1977. 1977 was my first trip to Chopaka and it was fly fishing - no motors then. Fly fishing was classed as "dry flies, wet flies, bucktail flies, nymphs and streamers." Apparently chironomids and indicators weren't invented yet. I did recognize one of the "game protector" names in the listings. It does not list the price of a license back then. I wonder what it was.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
My wife is going through some old stuff and found a 1965 Game Fishing pamphlet for WA state. Boy the regs were sure simple (and concise) back then. Things I picked out of the pamphlet. Trout limit was 12 fish, both upper and lower Hampton lakes opened up on April 25th, must have been later that it was revised to the March 1st opener. Nowadays it's back to the late April opener. For each county the local biologist and "game protectors" had their names, mailing addresses (PO Boxes) and phone numbers listed in the book. It appears there once was a fish called a steelhead as there's info about it in the pamphlet. Chopaka had not yet been classified as a fly fishing, no motors lake. Apparently it was somewhere between 1965 and 1977. 1977 was my first trip to Chopaka and it was fly fishing - no motors then. Fly fishing was classed as "dry flies, wet flies, bucktail flies, nymphs and streamers." Apparently chironomids and indicators weren't invented yet. I did recognize one of the "game protector" names in the listings. It does not list the price of a license back then. I wonder what it was.
The first license I ever bought in Washington State. was $3.50. Punch cards were free. This license let you fish for anything that swims in fresh or salt water This was in 1957. Salmon punch cards were free also. And fish limit was 16 fish. Once me and my BIL went fishing. We caught our limits and went home and had a fish fry. We fished Upper, upper Canyon Creek. You can't get in there anymore. unless you walk up the old logging road.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Warshal's - blast from the past for sure
I liked that store downtown. Dad would take me a few times a year. I'd been buying gear at pay-n-save and ernst/malmo with lawn mow and paper route money. That store was one of the reasons I started working at the seattle center at 14, so I could buy nice stuff.
 
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zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
At one time Fredrick & Nelson had african trophies up there along with the fancy gun rack. Seattle culture sure has changed from the early 70's. Eddie Bauer was down in Seattle also and did not seem to cater to the "metrosexual" man. Back then we wore red/black outdoors shirts.
 

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