Total Newbie

Caspore

New Member
I’m pretty much brand new to the fishing world. I have fished regularly with bait before, but never seriously and I’ve never gone fly fishing. I live on the western Puget Sound and I’m most interested in catching salmon, trout and flounder (I assume fly fishing isn’t the best choice for flounder). I’m also pretty curious as to if I should even pick up fly fishing for what I want to do, and if so, what kind of rod I should get. And last question, if I wanted to fish on saltwater beaches along puget sound, could I use the same gear to fish in lakes/streams/etc? Help would be very much appreciated.
 

Roper

Idiot Savant
WFF Supporter
Welcome, IMHO salt water fishing and fly fishing are two different animals. That is with the exception of beach casting flys to Searun Cutthroat. Flounder are bottom feeders so that isn't fly fishing. For salmon you're gonna need a boat or casting rods for the beach.

Fly fishing is mostly stillwater with a few exceptions. The Yakima is one of a couple of rivers where you can catch trout.

Then there's Eastern Washington, lots of trout opportunities there, but again, mostly stillwater.

Do you have any gear at all at this time? If so, whatcha got?

You can find lots of used gear on the Classified's. Start out simple and see how it goes...

@Tim Lockhart has written two books on stillwater tactics, pick one up!

Roper
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Welcome to the forum! The first saltwater fly rod fish I caught, @Roper, was a flounder :D - Sinclair Inlet right across from the shipyard. it was a feat I've never tried to repeat.

Caspore - use the search function on this website and look for discussions along the line you're questioning WFF on. Short answer from personal experience - I used an 8 weight fly rod for everything when I first started out fly fishing . Could not afford multiple rods. I caught SRC, trout, one flounder, coho, one blackmouth and a few steelhead on that rod. The rod was really too much rod for trout and SRC. Enjoy doing some research, part of the fun of fly fishing. Good luck.
Patrick
 

Robert Engleheart

Robert
WFF Supporter
Any fly fishing clubs near you? A source of years of experience. Mine welcomes newbs and beginners; we have weekly casting classes, fly tying and outings. A great way to shorten the learning curve.
 

wetline dave

Active Member
Salmon, searun cutts and flounder are all catchable off the beaches. Resident silvers are fairly abundant and this is a pink year and are catchable off beaches.

A 6 weight rod will serve your needs.

I strongly suggest getting some casting lessons from the get go. It will save you a lot of head aches. If lessons from a shop you should be able to try several rods which will help you in making your selection.

Dave
 

BriGuy

Active Member
If you don't already have them, you'll want some waders. Many beaches will not afford you much back cast room -- even at lower tides. Also, get a stripping basket. It really helps you manage your line and keeps it off the rough rocks, barnacles and oyster shells.

Just about any regular trout setup will work for SRC. Floating line does, too. However, if you get a sinking line, you'll really want that stripping basket.

Happy hunting!
 

Caspore

New Member
Welcome, IMHO salt water fishing and fly fishing are two different animals. That is with the exception of beach casting flys to Searun Cutthroat. Flounder are bottom feeders so that isn't fly fishing. For salmon you're gonna need a boat or casting rods for the beach.

Fly fishing is mostly stillwater with a few exceptions. The Yakima is one of a couple of rivers where you can catch trout.

Then there's Eastern Washington, lots of trout opportunities there, but again, mostly stillwater.

Do you have any gear at all at this time? If so, whatcha got?

You can find lots of used gear on the Classified's. Start out simple and see how it goes...

@Tim Lockhart has written two books on stillwater tactics, pick one up!

Roper
I don’t have any gear at the moment, but my very kind grandmother has offered to buy me a rod and a reel, she doesn’t seem too concerned with price either. I don’t really know what I need though, I’ve read some on the various rod weights and I think a 6 or 7 weight would be best for what I want to do. Could you make any recommendations?
 

Roper

Idiot Savant
WFF Supporter
I don’t have any gear at the moment, but my very kind grandmother has offered to buy me a rod and a reel, she doesn’t seem too concerned with price either. I don’t really know what I need though, I’ve read some on the various rod weights and I think a 6 or 7 weight would be best for what I want to do. Could you make any recommendations?
IMHO, there are two rod makers that are great value. Redington and TFO. I have each of them and they perform very well. All my reels are Ross and decades old now. They have never let me down. Keep an eye on the classified forum, you never know what might come up.
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
I don’t have any gear at the moment, but my very kind grandmother has offered to buy me a rod and a reel, she doesn’t seem too concerned with price either. I don’t really know what I need though, I’ve read some on the various rod weights and I think a 6 or 7 weight would be best for what I want to do. Could you make any recommendations?
Others here are most expert than I, but I recommend:
1. 9 foot 6 weight rod.
2. Intermediate sinking line like a Rio Coastal Quickshooter.
3. Waders
4. Stripping Basket
5. Spool of 8lb fluorocarbon
6. A casting lesson at your local fly shop. They can also set you up with the above (though you'll save money buying used) and a handful of flies.
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
(I assume fly fishing isn’t the best choice for flounder).
Oh, with a sinking line you can get in to lots of flounder. In fact, @Irafly has made it somewhat of a specialty of his.

As for the rest, yes you absolutely should take up fly fishing. There’s a wealth of information on this site (search for sea run cutthroat or src, for example), and the advice folks have given you here is great.
 

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
Others here are most expert than I, but I recommend:
1. 9 foot 6 weight rod.
2. Intermediate sinking line like a Rio Coastal Quickshooter.
3. Waders
4. Stripping Basket
5. Spool of 8lb fluorocarbon
6. A casting lesson at your local fly shop. They can also set you up with the above (though you'll save money buying used) and a handful of flies.
Highlighting #4. Don't fade a stripping basket.
 

PV_Premier

Active Member
Others here are most expert than I, but I recommend:
1. 9 foot 6 weight rod.
2. Intermediate sinking line like a Rio Coastal Quickshooter.
3. Waders
4. Stripping Basket
5. Spool of 8lb fluorocarbon
6. A casting lesson at your local fly shop. They can also set you up with the above (though you'll save money buying used) and a handful of flies.
7. WASH YOUR GEAR in fresh water after every trip and it will last eons longer
 

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