Golf Shaft Technology In Fly Rods (or visa versa)

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
So I'm getting ready to get back out on the course and tear shit up this summer...literally, not in a good way :) . Got a new shaft for the driver (stoked), while I was reading up on the technology that goes into the shaft it got me thinking - is there an application for this in fly rods? Not that fly rods need to cost any more, but I was a bit surprised after reading thru the blurbs on the technology of some of the newer shafts why these processes and materials aren't crossing over from golf to fishing or visa versa.

So what's the deal - are golf and fishing graphite so extraordinarily different that they can't benefit from each others technology? Or does everyone basically have some version of the same technology/materials but they all just call it something different for marketing purposes?

 

Rob Allen

Active Member
So I'm getting ready to get back out on the course and tear shit up this summer...literally, not in a good way :) . Got a new shaft for the driver (stoked), while I was reading up on the technology that goes into the shaft it got me thinking - is there an application for this in fly rods? Not that fly rods need to cost any more, but I was a bit surprised after reading thru the blurbs on the technology of some of the newer shafts why these processes and materials aren't crossing over from golf to fishing or visa versa.

So what's the deal - are golf and fishing graphite so extraordinarily different that they can't benefit from each others technology? Or does everyone basically have some version of the same technology/materials but they all just call it something different for marketing purposes?



There is a ton more money in golf clubs than there is fishing rods.. so lagging behind should be expected.. that said I think fishing rods are as good as they are ever going to be and have been at that stage more or less for 20 years
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
So I'm getting ready to get back out on the course and tear shit up this summer...literally, not in a good way :) . Got a new shaft for the driver (stoked), while I was reading up on the technology that goes into the shaft it got me thinking - is there an application for this in fly rods? Not that fly rods need to cost any more, but I was a bit surprised after reading thru the blurbs on the technology of some of the newer shafts why these processes and materials aren't crossing over from golf to fishing or visa versa.

So what's the deal - are golf and fishing graphite so extraordinarily different that they can't benefit from each others technology? Or does everyone basically have some version of the same technology/materials but they all just call it something different for marketing purposes?


Don't sweat the buzz words. Get some clubs that fit you and swing away. I personally prefer steel shafts on all my irons in a stiff configuration. I play 1"-1.5" over standard. The longer you go the stiffer you need therefore graphite is not a good thing. On the woods is where graphite shines and I play standard lengths there in a stiff graphite format. I'm not saying my advice is good but it works for me. Well sometimes works for me.
 

herkileez

WFF Supporter
So I'm getting ready to get back out on the course and tear shit up this summer...literally, not in a good way :) . Got a new shaft for the driver (stoked), while I was reading up on the technology that goes into the shaft it got me thinking - is there an application for this in fly rods? Not that fly rods need to cost any more, but I was a bit surprised after reading thru the blurbs on the technology of some of the newer shafts why these processes and materials aren't crossing over from golf to fishing or visa versa.

So what's the deal - are golf and fishing graphite so extraordinarily different that they can't benefit from each others technology? Or does everyone basically have some version of the same technology/materials but they all just call it something different for marketing purposes?

Golf equipment manufacturers are masters at always having some new technology that makes last years' model obsolete. That business model does cross over to some rod manufacturers.
 

GOTY

9x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
Golf shaft technology, both in the graphite used and resins, is far and away above anything you'll currently find in a fishing rod. It's always amusing how much a fly rod blank can cost relative to an unbuilt golf shaft.

That said, they need to be. The amount of force applied to a golf shaft and the tolerances required for it to perform when moving 120mph and absorbing the impact from hitting a solid object at 120mph is far different than a fly rod. A golf shaft moving 3mm in the wrong direction is a potentially huge deal, however if your fly rod does, your cast won't change much at all.

Plus golf companies can afford to pump millions into R&D, super computers, etc. that fly rod companies simply cannot do.

That ventus shaft is incredible for what it does.
 
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dustinchromers

Active Member
Golf equipment manufacturers are masters at always having some new technology that makes last years' model obsolete. That business model does cross over to some rod manufacturers.

Boron infused triaxial hoop strength enhanced titanamax? Precision tube wall tapered bubble shaft technology?

But of course sir. What you're looking at is the next generation TXL carbon force pro series by hole hunter.
 

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
That said, they need to be. The amount of force applied to a golf shaft and the tolerances required for it to perform when moving 120mph and absorbing the impact from hitting a solid object at 120mph is far different than a fly rod. A golf shaft moving 3mm in the wrong direction is a potentially huge deal, however if your fly rod does, your cast won't change much at all.
It brings me much joy you think I'm hitting 120 club head speed. I'm happy @ 110, but damn 120 would be sweet.

Good point on the amount of force - I hadn't thought about that, but it makes perfect sense.
 

Jockurr

WFF Supporter
As above I thought Gary Loomis was working the club shaft angle after he sold his rod business to Shimano.
it’s late in the day so I may be confused..
 

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
As above I thought Gary Loomis was working the club shaft angle after he sold his rod business to Shimano.
it’s late in the day so I may be confused..
I'll be damned. Never made the connection it was his name.

 

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