Alarming lack of boat mechanics and parts

JayB

Active Member
There is far more to a career than just money, but a person with a bachelor's degree earns $900,000 (male) or $630,000 (female) more over over their lifetime than someone with only a high school diploma (education and lifetime earnings and how does a college degree improve graduates' employment and earnings potential. These are median values which deemphasize the impact of outliers like a Bill Gates (college dropout). The college advantages drop, but they are still substantial, when one considers socio-demographic variables (such as the kids of the already rich are far more likely to go to college) and other factors (value of the dollar at present vs. the future).

Unemployment levels among those with a college degree are consistently lower than those with only a high school degree and life expectancy among college graduates appears to be higher by several years.

If we want to level the playing field and encourage more students to pursue careers in the trades, we might need to consider improving pay and benefits and improving working conditions. A job that leaves your body broken and you in pain in your 30's seems like a bad tradeoff for a paycheck.

If you know of a student who is interested in pursuing a trades education, have them contact their local community college to explore opportunities in their local area.

Steve

That's a pretty accurate high-level summary, but there are several confounding factors to consider.

People that go to college tend to score higher on measures of intelligence, conscientiousness, etc that are highly correlated with higher earnings. It's uncertain how much of the earnings premium is a consequence of what people learned in college vs the attributes that they brought with them to college. The data on life expectancy, health, marriage duration and every other metric suffers from the same problem.

The picture also gets more complicated when you disaggregate "college graduate" a bit further and look at earnings by university and major, and factor in the outsized effect of a relatively small subset of professional degrees that are associated with high-earnings. I don't think the data exists, but it would be interesting to see a comparison of modal incomes for various universities/degrees 1, 5, 10, and 20 years out. Ditto for the average out-of-pocket cost to acquire the degree, so that prospective students could have at least a vaguely accurate sense of the ROI and whether or not it makes financial sense to borrow money to finance the degree. Or whether it makes sense to pay X$ for a degree when you can get the same degree and earn just as much or more from a school that charges $X/n for the same degree.

I'm sure the data would be incredibly difficult to acquire and compile, but I also suspect that there are quite a few universities and/or degree programs that aren't exactly clamoring for that kind of data to be generated and widely distributed. Some things are worth learning for their own sake, it's not all about money, etc, etc, etc (the only people who talk like that that I take seriously are the few non-bitter/resentful adjuncts who aren't supported by a high earning spouse) but if the people making those claims believe their own rhetoric then they should be confident that whatever they're teaching will still draw students irrespective of the price-point or the ROI.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
The last time I was in a position to hire and try to train guys to build homes was in the 90s. Time after time the guys that succeeded and wanted to learn with the thought of long term employment in mind, were guys that were married, in their thirties, had children and ties to the community. Most of them were making a change from their previous employment in retail, restaurant. or floating from job to job looking for the right fit.

Many of them eventually moved on to other companies and doing my job for those outfits. They were always apologetic for leaving and I handled that conversation by telling them that I never held it against a guy for trying to better himself or his situation. We were and still are friends.
 

Driftless Dan

Driftless Dan
WFF Supporter
The picture also gets more complicated when you disaggregate "college graduate" a bit further and look at earnings by university and major, and factor in the outsized effect of a relatively small subset of professional degrees that are associated with high-earnings. I don't think the data exists, but it would be interesting to see a comparison of modal incomes for various universities/degrees 1, 5, 10, and 20 years out. Ditto for the average out-of-pocket cost to acquire the degree, so that prospective students could have at least a vaguely accurate sense of the ROI and whether or not it makes financial sense to borrow money to finance the degree. Or whether it makes sense to pay X$ for a degree when you can get the same degree and earn just as much or more from a school that charges $X/n for the same degree.
True, some college degrees are worth more than others.

My daughter wanted to go to art school. she was talented enough to get to the best school in the nation, Rhode Island School of Design, but I did find a web site that looked at earning at 5 and 10 years. 10 years out, average income from RISD was only $60K. She ended up going to a regular university that has a school of art, in case she wants to pursue other (more lucrative) avenues.

My son, who graduated recently with a degree in computer engineering, and with unimpressive grades, I might add, was offered a job by a multinational corporation, starting at $80K, before he even graduated.
 
Last edited:

surfnfish

Active Member
The $45 an hour handyman I've used before is now charging $95 an hour due to demand, says the techies moving into the Bend/Sunriver area are willing to pay it and he's happy to charge it.
An established remodel contractor I've known for years doubled his project rates and is currently booked to the end of 2022, all high tech customers who bought into the area in the last year.
It's not only social media that has severely disrupted our society, the insane money flowing from high tech corps to it's employees has absolutely t-boned any sense of fiscal normality.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
The $45 an hour handyman I've used before is now charging $95 an hour due to demand, says the techies moving into the Bend/Sunriver area are willing to pay it and he's happy to charge it.
An established remodel contractor I've known for years doubled his project rates and is currently booked to the end of 2022, all high tech customers who bought into the area in the last year.
It's not only social media that has severely disrupted our society, the insane money flowing from high tech corps to it's employees has absolutely t-boned any sense of fiscal normality.
At age 67 I have now spent 50 years perfecting my craft. Well, almost perfecting it. I'm still learning stuff almost daily but it is seldom that I'm out of my comfort zone. I have reduced my workload to smaller handyman style stuff that I can do by myself and schedule in between several fishing seasons.

As mentioned before, there aren't many youngsters coming up to fill the need for the things that I do. Everyone that I know doing what I do is either retired like me or getting close. So, what is a life time of experience worth to you? Being experienced in many areas means you often just need to hire me and not an additional plumber, drywaller, flooring guy, painter, etc. and their associated profit margins and scheduling conflicts.

Usually I like to just give out a price for the job and not an hourly rate. Hourly rates can scare people. If they insist on a rate I tell them $65 and hour which includes from when I leave my house, the time spent picking up materials, doing the work and making the dump run. That freaks 'em. Last week I finished a job of removing some existing laminate counter tops and prepping the cabinets for new granite and hooking up the new sink after the company installed their granite. I quoted $1700. It took two days, about 14 hours total = $121+ per hour. If I had told him my hourly rate he would have balked and went elsewhere. It's weird how people react and I quit trying to figure it out years ago.
 

wakingflies

Active Member
I quoted $1700. It took two days, about 14 hours total = $121+ per hour. If I had told him my hourly rate he would have balked and went elsewhere. It's weird how people react and I quit trying to figure it out years ago.
This is so true, I believe that the client/ customer relates the hourly to their personal job and hourly wage which they forget the company they work for will invoice four times that to their client/customers.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top