New to fly fishing. Help me pick my first rod.

east coast

Active Member
please please please don't make me count !!!!

To help him with his question why not ask "Who is still using their first rod, or second?"
 

LilCutts

fish & whistle
WFF Premium
please please please don't make me count !!!!

To help him with his question why not ask "Who is still using their first rod, or second?"
Ha!! But I want to know who holds the title for most rods! I currently have 30+ at my house but only six are mine. Surely someone on the forum has 20 to 30 that they actually own...
 

Zak

WFF Premium
I have too many rods ("too many" is in the eye of the beholder-I have rods I never use so that's too many to me). But I still get the most use out of my first "real" fly rod, a Sage Light Line 486-2 (I had an Eagle Claw Trailmaster fly/spin rod before that). My advice: shell out for a nice rod with a good warranty. Sage has repaired my LL three times.
 

east coast

Active Member
I have too many rods ("too many" is in the eye of the beholder-I have rods I never use so that's too many to me). But I still get the most use out of my first "real" fly rod, a Sage Light Line 486-2 (I had an Eagle Claw Trailmaster fly/spin rod before that). My advice: shell out for a nice rod with a good warranty. Sage has repaired my LL three times.
I believe I'm under 30 (I hope). I use 490-3 LL mostly for trout. Sent it to Sage with a broken tip. They sent me a new one with a note saying mine was worn out, graphite showing through everywhere.
 
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jaredoconnor

WFF Premium
I wouldn't worry about your first rod, too much. I definitely wouldn't spend more than $200. There is a non-trivial chance that it won't be your ideal rod, once you get out of the beginner phase. Even if you focus solely on trout fishing in rivers, there are many techniques and they all have specialized gear that go along with them. Ie. Euro nymphing, trout Spey, meat throwing and so on.

Regardless, I will re-iterate what I said earlier; I believe a 3-4wt 10ft rod is the most versatile rod you will find, for trout fishing on rivers. If you put a euro line or mono rig on it, that will cover euro nymphing. If you put a 4wt line on it, that will cover most conventional fly fishing. If you put a 175gr Skagit line on it, you effectively get a light trout Spey setup. It is a good place to start, until you figure out exactly what you want to do.
 
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Old Man

A very Old Man
If I fished with a 10' rod, I'd be in the bushes on the opposite bank. I use a 7'9" 3wt in the summer time. Plus as old as I am I only fish in the summer time now.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Premium
If I fished with a 10' rod, I'd be in the bushes on the opposite bank. I use a 7'9" 3wt in the summer time. Plus as old as I am I only fish in the summer time now.

Have you ever tried it, though? Long rods have advantages on small creeks. Keep in mind that they were originally invented to fish within 15-20ft. In my opinion, the only time length is a problem is when you have a low canopy over head. In those circumstances, you don't need a short rod for casting, but you do need a short rod for playing and landing fish.

Below is the creek that I learned how to fish on. You can jump from one side to the other, most of the time. I wouldn't hesitate to use my 10ft 3wt here.

1620856614609.jpeg
 

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