Harbinger of the Summer To Come - Montana

jasmillo

WFF Supporter

You’ve had HI to yourself for a year and a half.

Our beaches, rivers, lakes and trails have looked like that since last summer. Welcome back to the party...


Hey, Solitude!
He actually does sorta know how to use a fly rod...but that would leave my other 6 sibs to teach:confused:
They'll probably only fish a couple times, so not really worth it - old dogs, new tricks.

I arrived in MT in 97 with only a spinning rod in hand. Fished that way for a number of months before picking up fly fishing. Nobody ever bothered me, especially not actual Montanan’s. A few tourists may have thrown me the stink eye but who cares about them ;). He’ll be fine as long as it’s legal gear where your fishing.
 

Greenyhater

New Member
To the original post why it’s bad to assume - 1 how do you know they didn’t ask the landowner for permission? ....because they’re from Denver, well shit that’s half of Bozeman. 2 do you carry a badge to enforce your knowledge because there is laws in MT that make it illegal to badger harass sportsmen. 3 a third party who does not own the land cannot legally press charges against a trespassers, only the land owner can and the fine in MT is a whopping $125, they spent more in fuel to get to Yellowstone river.

I respect private property rights but often times if your not the law or landowner it’s best to mind your own godamn business.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
To the original post why it’s bad to assume - 1 how do you know they didn’t ask the landowner for permission? ....because they’re from Denver, well shit that’s half of Bozeman. 2 do you carry a badge to enforce your knowledge because there is laws in MT that make it illegal to badger harass sportsmen. 3 a third party who does not own the land cannot legally press charges against a trespassers, only the land owner can and the fine in MT is a whopping $125, they spent more in fuel to get to Yellowstone river.

I respect private property rights but often times if your not the law or landowner it’s best to mind your own godamn business.
Law Enforcement Officers and landowners can't be everywhere. Everyone is party to preserving stream access in Montana, not just land owners and LEOs.
It makes sense to say something. Do you turn your head when you observe suspicious behavior? Would you say something if you saw someone hauling off your neighbor's property from their garage, or just "mind your own business" because it might be someone who has permission?
A little civil exchange isn't violating anyone's rights, badgering, harassing, or intruding into their business.
Also, your comment regarding the size of the fine is irrelevant.
 

Solitude

Active Member
My understanding is Montana is still the best place going for the folks that live there 6-8 months out of the year.
I hear Arizona is pretty nice as well.
SF
AZ is really nice. Warm days with beautiful scenery and carp and bass fishing, as well as golf and atv riding...... none of those wolves, grizzlies etc... definitely better to go to than Montana
 

Mike.Cline

Bozeman, Montana
I respect private property rights but often times if your not the law or landowner it’s best to mind your own godamn business.
Pretty naive to think that anglers don’t have a RESPONSIBILITY to call attention to illegal behavior when they see it. Our MT Stream Access Law is precious and isn’t to be taken for granted. A great many private property owners have been generous in allowing access across their land to our streams, many have not. Some of those generous property owners have revoked access because anglers and others have trashed fences, left trash and otherwise degraded their property. Others have lobbied for more restrictive access based on bad recreationalist behavior. A great example happened along the Yellowstone about eight years ago. There was a trailhead into the Black Canyon of the Yellowstone in Gardiner. You had to pass through about 1/2 mile of private land to reach the YNP boundary and the Yellowstone River Trail. It was a great place to access the Black Canyon section of the river and fish in some very remote water. Well enough anglers and others left enough trash at the trail head and along the private land as well as leaving the trail and causing bank erosion that the landowner got fed up and closed the trail head. YNP was powerless to reverse this and we lost great access because of bad behavior. If you want to access this part of the canyon today it is a long, arduous trip from near vertical trails in the park.

I don’t consider it “harassing or threatening” to call attention to transgressions when you see them on the stream. I call it a civic responsibility. And you can always have the local Sheriff’s # on speed dial.
 
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Swimmy

Well-Known Member
I have no problem with educating folks in a polite way if they might be doing something illegal. I see it sometimes where folks might be fishing after 2pm on a stream under hoot owl. Most times they just have no clue and appreciate the heads up.

But especially with my poach boat I've had my fair share of entitled outfitters, landowners, and guides give me the "Boy, where are you from" line. I hate that shit and why does it matter?

There is one stream in particular where the ranch hand will actually sit and watch you from his 4 wheeler with a shot gun. Then they always meet you at the take-out to act like they are just making small talk.

Since I'm a law abiding citizen and know my rights now just tell 'em to fuck off.

FB8A3D23_BD23_42E1_A202_968345C2A5D0_zpsgegjwxix.jpg
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Thanks for educating those people. I hope it sticks with them. It should go without saying, but it is the responsibility of all resident and nonresident visitors and outdoor users to educate themselves on the rules and laws of any land/waters they visit. Every State has plenty of available information available on the topic, even if someone only puts forth a minimum amount of effort to find it. It is in the printed regulations, presumably something a responsible license holder would familiarize themselves with (assuming they even had a license).

Too bad the states won't take the time to learn about federal navigation law.. in short all states legally should have stream access laws on par with Montana's.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
I've been living here in Montana for going on 15 years now. I can state for sure that this state is one hell of a lot cleaner that Washington state on the skinny water. While I try to fish only in the National Forests. Because not many people will travel that far to fish. Plus I only fish during the week. Being retired, I can go any time I want to..

I try to find places close to the dirt roads in the hills. Getting to slow on foot to go brush busting to find access. So far I have lucked out on spots. Got a lot in my memory banks on where to go.
 

JACKspASS

Active Member
I've been living here in Montana for going on 15 years now. I can state for sure that this state is one hell of a lot cleaner that Washington state on the skinny water. While I try to fish only in the National Forests. Because not many people will travel that far to fish. Plus I only fish during the week. Being retired, I can go any time I want to..

I try to find places close to the dirt roads in the hills. Getting to slow on foot to go brush busting to find access. So far I have lucked out on spots. Got a lot in my memory banks on where to go.
You've been gone from Wa about as long as I have. Two less maggots sore mouthing all the fish in the skinny waters of the Sky. Good ol days...
 
The OP mentioned “orange plaques and post tops“ denoting posting of the land. I have hiked, fished, climbed, and conducted field work in MT for 50 years and didn’t know about the orange posts being a legal means of posting private property for the first 30 years or so. That seems to be a Montana’s idiosyncracy that may be lost on a lot of out of state visitors.
 
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Old406Kid

Active Member
The OP mentioned “orange plaques and post tops“ donating posting of the land. I have hiked, fished, climbed, and conducted field work in MT for 50 years and didn’t know about the orange posts being a legal means of posting private property for the first 30 years or so. That seems to be a Montana’s idiosyncracy that may be lost on a lot of out of state visitors.
Good point.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
I've been living here in Montana for going on 15 years now. I can state for sure that this state is one hell of a lot cleaner that Washington state on the skinny water. While I try to fish only in the National Forests. Because not many people will travel that far to fish. Plus I only fish during the week. Being retired, I can go any time I want to..

I try to find places close to the dirt roads in the hills. Getting to slow on foot to go brush busting to find access. So far I have lucked out on spots. Got a lot in my memory banks on where to go.
Jim,
No doubt Montana is cleaner. It also has a lot less people.
Unfortunately, there is litter everywhere.
There is just less of it in Montana.
It sucks wherever it is.
SF
 

Hem

Active Member
The OP mentioned “orange plaques and post tops“ donating posting of the land. I have hiked, fished, climbed, and conducted field work in MT for 50 years and didn’t know about the orange posts being a legal means of posting private property for the first 30 years or so. That seems to be a Montana’s idiosyncracy that may be lost on a lot of out of state visitors.
I was under the impression that historically painted purple posts signified no trespassing/hunting.
 

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