The Teardrop Camper?

IveofIone

WFF Supporter
Do these things make sense to anyone? On YouTube I see dozens of these being built, how to build or being camped out of and am baffled buy how popular they are. So tiny and so cramped with very little storage space they seem an unusual choice of a camping rig. In some climates they might be understandable because of the outdoor kitchen but in the northwest one of the main camping needs is shelter from the rain. I guess I'm showing my age but going outside for my morning coffee is no longer an option. If it is 42 degrees and raining I ain't standing outside to cook. For the record, I have cooked at 17,400' in below zero temps and thought I was having a great time but know better now
Anyone camping out of a teardrop and if so, how do you use it?

Curious Ive
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
Before my current set-up, I owned an R-Pod which is a big teardrop camper.

I think they are used as krusty and northern have stated; for smaller vehicles or simply hard sided tents. I think they are also used as beginner trailers. A “cheaper”, simpler way to determine if camper trailers are good for you. I suspect many are sold outright after a year or two or upgraded.
 

wanderingrichard

Active Member
Before my current set-up, I owned an R-Pod which is a big teardrop camper.

I think they are used as krusty and northern have stated; for smaller vehicles or simply hard sided tents. I think they are also used as beginner trailers. A “cheaper”, simpler way to determine if camper trailers are good for you. I suspect many are sold outright after a year or two or upgraded.
From what I've learned from my neighbors, one with a teardrop, one with an A frame pop up, its a minimalist camping thing. They don't need a big guzzler SUV or truck to tow it and can get in and out of spots larger rigs can't. The guy with the A frame pop up? his daughter just bought a fibreglass pod version made in Canada. Seems insulated really well.
 

Freestone

WFF Supporter
I have never understood teardrops except for the cute factor. The only one that I have seen that makes a little sense belongs to a friend who tows a pop-top tear drop with his Outback. With the top popped, he can stand up in it but still must cook outside.

Heck, my Honda Element has more room inside than most teardrops - and I can cook inside it! 3F417D15-BCB9-4C18-A281-B3E47B59CC9F.jpeg 203F3EBF-1ED5-4A54-97CD-A82D18DA4625.jpeg
 

Northern

It's all good.
WFF Supporter
I have never understood teardrops except for the cute factor. The only one that I have seen that makes a little sense belongs to a friend who tows a pop-top tear drop with his Outback. With the top popped, he can stand up in it but still must cook outside.

Heck, my Honda Element has more room inside than most teardrops - and I can cook inside it!
Same thought process that had me buy an AWD Sienna instead of a teardrop. I think both of us camp solo most of the time, tho. The SUV/van is a bit tight for two!
 

IveofIone

WFF Supporter
I have never understood teardrops except for the cute factor. The only one that I have seen that makes a little sense belongs to a friend who tows a pop-top tear drop with his Outback. With the top popped, he can stand up in it but still must cook outside.

Heck, my Honda Element has more room inside than most teardrops - and I can cook inside it! View attachment 280317 View attachment 280318
That's a fine looking chuck box you are cooking on Sue!
 

Swimmy

Well-Known Member
I need more space but hey, if a teardrop is your thing more power
L8VPdFIT_o.gif


I couldn't be more stoked on my current rig though. The 2285 is perfect.

001(10).HEIC
 

IveofIone

WFF Supporter
I can certainly understand the charm of building a teardrop, starting with a Northern Tool aluminum 5' x 8' trailer for about $750 and going from there. Just a fun project for sure but then when you are done you have to sleep in it. And if you are a little bit claustrophobic.....:eek:

There are thousands of people living in vehicles right now and for many of them it is all they have, it is necessity more than choice. And of course the van thing is at it's peak with van prices up and availability down. A van makes a helluva lot of sense because you can park it almost anywhere, don't have backing up issues and don't have to go outside to cook or go to bed.

Rather than a tow vehicle and a trailer the rig that makes the most sense to me as a camper/fly fisher is the smallest of the Promaster full sized vans-the 118'' wheelbase model. I'm surprised that I don't see more of these in lieu of living in an SUV or a minivan. They look small on the outside but in reality are much bigger inside than either a teardrop or a pickup with a canopy on an 8' bed. Inside they are 65'' tall compared to the 42-48'' of the teardrop or pickup. Interior length of the living area is 105'' compared to about 96' inches for the other two and width is 76'', over a foot wider inside with enough room to place a bed crosswise.

Fully rigged 10' fly rods can be hung from the ceiling and there is plenty of room to add solar, batteries, inverter, electric fridge, sink, etc. I have all of that and more in the 8' bed of my Casa, if I moved into one of those vans it would be like going from a 1 bedroom apartment to a 2 bedroom! If I was 73 rather than 83 I would be building one of those out. But it's a little late now.....
 

Krusty

Outta Here
I can certainly understand the charm of building a teardrop, starting with a Northern Tool aluminum 5' x 8' trailer for about $750 and going from there. Just a fun project for sure but then when you are done you have to sleep in it. And if you are a little bit claustrophobic.....:eek:

There are thousands of people living in vehicles right now and for many of them it is all they have, it is necessity more than choice. And of course the van thing is at it's peak with van prices up and availability down. A van makes a helluva lot of sense because you can park it almost anywhere, don't have backing up issues and don't have to go outside to cook or go to bed.

Rather than a tow vehicle and a trailer the rig that makes the most sense to me as a camper/fly fisher is the smallest of the Promaster full sized vans-the 118'' wheelbase model. I'm surprised that I don't see more of these in lieu of living in an SUV or a minivan. They look small on the outside but in reality are much bigger inside than either a teardrop or a pickup with a canopy on an 8' bed. Inside they are 65'' tall compared to the 42-48'' of the teardrop or pickup. Interior length of the living area is 105'' compared to about 96' inches for the other two and width is 76'', over a foot wider inside with enough room to place a bed crosswise.

Fully rigged 10' fly rods can be hung from the ceiling and there is plenty of room to add solar, batteries, inverter, electric fridge, sink, etc. I have all of that and more in the 8' bed of my Casa, if I moved into one of those vans it would be like going from a 1 bedroom apartment to a 2 bedroom! If I was 73 rather than 83 I would be building one of those out. But it's a little late now.....
I've seen the Casa. It would be more like moving from a one bedroom luxury condo to a two bedroom luxury condo.
 

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