Inflatable Boat vs Framed One Person Pontoon

BigSky

Member
I'm seeking input from those who have owned/used single person framed pontoons and single person inflatable boats. I own and have used a Scadden Outlaw X5 for years. I absolutely love it. However, I have two bad rotator cuffs from military injuries which just seem to be getting worse each year. When I find myself rowing back up current or cross current the effort required just gets worse every year. Last year when fishing the Big Horn river I saw a guy older than me fishing from a small one person boat. I don't recall what make or model it was; but, it was something like a Watermaster Grizzly or OSG Clearwater type single person boat and he seemed to scoot around much more effortlessly than I did. From your experience is one more maneuverable than the other? Maybe there are the same for all I know. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

Wayne Kohan

fish-ician
Having owned both framed and unframed inflatables, I think it is much easier to row with a frame. How hard it is to scoot back and forth across a river seems to be more related to your footprint in the water, that is, the heavier the load and the lower the boat sits in the water and how much rocker there is. If you have a boat with a lot of rocker, and aren’t carrying a bunch of weight, it is easier to maneuver, but it is more squirrelly trying to hold a straight line in still waters. I feel the pinned oarlocks give you less range of motion than the usual oar/oarlock setup.
 

cmann886

Active Member
Have you considered an electric motor and a small electric wheelchair battery? It would be important to keep things light but it might be worth the extra hassle and weight if rowing causes pain and is difficult.
 

BigSky

Member
I appreciate the input all. It seems, based on opinions so far, I am utilizing my best option currently. My Dr. says I may have to have surgery on one shoulder and I may do that this coming winter. cmann886, yes, I do have an electric trolling motor and use it when I can and must. Jake Dogfish, you are definitely correct with respect to a sailboat in the wind.
 

l8apx

New Member
Something like the Fish Cat Cougar (framed + 2 straight pontoons) moves through the water more efficiently than anything that's round/oval. Framed setups are heavier overall and more time/trouble to setup, take down, and transport.

Personally, I pretty much gave up on all of them since I bought a 17' jon boat. Obviously this doesn't work in all situations and locations, but it sure is a more pleasant experience on a lake.
 

c-dawg

WFF Supporter
I own a Creek Company 8' pontoon and an Outcast Stealth Pro. They both fish easily and are both equally quite maneuverable. However, the Outcast is slightly faster than the the framed Creek Company boat, which equates to a little easier rowing. I suspect that is because, as Wayne noted above, the framed pontoon has more draft. Also, I agree with him about the pinned oars; you can't feather the oars. Usually that's not a big deal though if you're not pulling plugs or something like that.
 

Slimbeaux

Member
Love my Scadden Zoo Cougar even if it does float a little rear heavy. I would think that a raft, that has more mass in the water would be a lot harder to paddle/row. I have also had injury's that have impeded my movement. But when I lived in Seatac, my chiropractor was great at giving me exercises to rebuild my bad joints. Might try a sports doctor too. I hear there is a great one in Ballard. Good luck my friend.
 

bakerite

Active Member
I have a NRS GigBob that uses drop stich technology like stand up paddle boards, also have an older pontoon, a Dave Scadden Madison. The Gigbob is easier with fins and can be used without the pontoons for a lower profile. Rowing seems pretty easy with it and it is good in rivers. I use an electric motor on it when on large reservoirs. I recently fished with a friend who has an Outcast Panther, which has a little lower profile for wind, compared to most other pontoons, but seemed similar to the GigBob in the wind. I recently backed over part of it inflated with the one rear tire of my Tundra and it has shown no ill effects! It's a great boat, but NRS raised the price $400 since last year.
 

jangles

Member
Just saw this . I have a Saturn 385 XL Kaboat , a Watermaster Kodiak , a Colorado XT a float tube and 17 ' jon boat . They all have their pros and cons . If I had to choose just one it would be the Watermaster .
 
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J.T. Piscator

New Member
jangles, I am currently trying to decide whether to buy a Watermaster Kodiak or the Catchercraft Freestone. Two questions please Why do you like the Watermaster and what don't you like about it? Thanks
 

jangles

Member
jangles, I am currently trying to decide whether to buy a Watermaster Kodiak or the Catchercraft Freestone. Two questions please Why do you like the Watermaster and what don't you like about it? Thanks
Check this thread out , all you want to know but were too scared to ask !lol BTW , there's nothing I dont like about it . It's probably the single best purchase I have made for fly fishing in 40 plus years of fishing .

 
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Roper

Idiot Savant
WFF Supporter
Lots of good feedback about boats, but what about the RC? Is it torn or is there scar tissue from the injury? Deep tissue massage can break up scar tissue...you might look into that before surgery.
 

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