New to fly fishing. Looking for wader suggestions

Old Man

A very Old Man
I used the Waist high waders. Where I fish the water is only about 18" deep. I can swim but don't ever get in water any deeper than that. I can or used to wade that way. Now I don't wade anymore. Where I now fish skinny water I can fish from the bank and still catch fish.

But I just an old man and shouldn't be taken seriously. I've had lots of chest high because when younger I would wade to the top of my chest highs. Now that I'm an old man and want to get older, I quit wading all together. If I did get back into wading I would use my Chest waders or buy some waist highs..

I have had two pair of waist high waders and they both leaked in the same place. In the crotch, it's quite the wake up when your crossing some skinny water and your boys get wet.
 

SignorVince

Active Member
I've a set of patagucci Rio Gallegos waders that convert pretty nicely to waist highs, I like 'em. Dryft makes a waist high that looks pretty handy for boat/raft fishing, and I've heard good stuff about their materials.
+1 on the Rios, I love mine.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
A wading staff is also a good thing to have. You can get collapsible hiking poles, on Amazon, for about $40. They aren't essential, if you are careful. However, they allow you to move much faster. They also allow you to get to places that other people can't.
^^This^^ However until you are experienced at wading, I would disregard the "move much faster" and "get to places that other people can't" parts.

And I highly recommend a wading staff. I won't wade a stream without having one on my belt to deploy almost instantly. I use a hybrid folding - telescoping adjustable hiking pole that came with belt holster. I bought a pair several years ago and have yet to need the spare.
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Also watch this series; there's 5 parts in all.

 
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Kilchis

WFF Supporter
If you decide on Cabelas waders don't buy until you try them on. The ankle in the pair I had was so tight that I would spend literally five minutes per foot working them off. If I just pulled and tugged the neoprene seams in the booties would have failed.
 

BriGuy

Active Member
I have a pair of those and they are quite good for the price. Durable, too. I got lucky and actually found a pair in a tall size so the crotch is where it is supposed to be. They are often on sale.

My only complaint is that they aren't quite as tailored as a higher end pair.
When I wear them out, I'll probably upgrade to a pair with a zipper for easier peepee.
 
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Zak

WFF Supporter
WFF Supporter
I have a pair of those and they are quite good for the price. Durable, too. I got lucky and actually found a pair in a tall size so the crotch is where it is supposed to be. They are often on sale.

My only complaint is that they aren't quite as tailored as a higher end pair.
When I wear them out, I'll probably upgrade to a pair with a zipper for easier peepee.
I went through two pairs of these Cabelas over six or seven years and got my money's worth and then some from them. When my last pair started leaking at the end of last year, I upgraded to Patagonias. The pataguccis are really nice, but I'm not sure they are $500 better than the Cabela's, and they are much heavier. Patagonia's lifetime warranty is nice, though, and I like the company.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
I highly recommend getting felt boots, not rubber. WA freestone rivers are the most slippery rivers I have ever fished. Rubber boots are flat out dangerous, even if you put a tonne of studs in them.
On the subject of boots, if you are going to fish close to the car, felt and studded felt are good options. But felt soles wear out much more quickly if you hike very much with them. They are also very slippery on muddy streambanks.

I just bought my third pair of Korkers boots in 12 years. They have interchangeable soles and come standard with 1 pair of felt soles for wading and 1 pair of unstudded rubber soles that work quite well for hiking, but are terrible for wading. However the same rubber soles with studs are very comparable to felt and cost under $50. They also have aluminum bar cleat soles that I've found had better traction than felt but heavier than the standard studded rubber so there are a few options.
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
Why not get all of the above? Personally, I use my Orvis Pros (they're bomb proof) only for winter steelheading and cold weather trout fishing, waist highs for float tubing (unless you're stuck in 1992, today's float tubes have you seated on top of the water) and fishing out of my Commander (far easier to pee out of), and from now through Late Sept and into Oct, I wet wade (always quick dry pants, saves the legs from branches, poison oak, etc).
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
A few months. Stop giving this man false hope!
Shockingly, my waist highs I bought at Sportsman's last year are still going strong. Granted, I've only had them on river fishing a half dozen times (still survived some bushwhacking) & they only get used musky & smallie fishing out of my Commander, but I still consider it a win considering the $100 price tag. Just lucky I guess...
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
Shockingly, my waist highs I bought at Sportsman's last year are still going strong. Granted, I've only had them on river fishing a half dozen times (still survived some bushwhacking) & they only get used musky & smallie fishing out of my Commander, but I still consider it a win considering the $100 price tag. Just lucky I guess...

Yeah, for sure. The most recent pair of waders I bought (Patagonia) have been very durable and used in salt 75-100 times. Patagonia pair prior, leaking at 3-4 months. Simms pair prior to that, leaking within a month. Granted, cheap Simms model bought as backup but still a couple hundred bucks. You just never know.

Longest lasting pair of waders I ever owned with no issues were the first pair I bought. A pair of Hodgeman neoprene waders on clearance from Bob Wards in Missoula in ‘98 I think. If I recall, I paid like 40 bucks which was a ton of money for me when I was in college. Decided to “spring” for them after a particularly cold October morning wet wading session on the Bitterroot. Those things never developed a leak and I had them for over a decade.
 

5weight

Active Member
If you fish year round, I think you’ll find chest waders versus pants to be more useful.
You might check out the Redington Sonic Pros.
They have models for stout folks.
When you try on waders, consider bringing the heaviest under layer and socks you’d plan to wear while fishing.
That way you can determine if you’ll have room to move around, if the booties are to tight etc.
I like a looser fitting wader myself then one that feels constrictive if I’m layered up for cold weather fishing.
You’ll need wading boots as well regardless of what option you decide to go with unless you buy bootfoot waders.
Good luck.
SF
Just bought a new pair of Sonic Pros from an Ebay seller for $245. with tax and shipping. Don't wait long. I just met a Redington employee at a local lake. He told me the warehouse was nearly empty.
 
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