Idaho Culling 90% of Wolves

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
Hey
A bunch of facts and explanations about the nuances and the difficulty of species management won't help fire up this thread and get it locked.
But I appreciate your trying.
;)
 

WAS

Active Member
I spent the day on the river, had a great time catching nice cut thwoats. No wolves were killed in today's adventure.

Can we all go to bed now?
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
Hey
A bunch of facts and explanations about the nuances and the difficulty of species management won't help fire up this thread and get it locked.
But I appreciate your trying.
;)


Do the Canadian wolves get free healthcare? Why are they coming here if their system is so great?
 

roadglideguy

Active Member
I am amazed how we do not learn from our past lessons. I have done a lot of ecological research. I have worked with and on wolves in different capacities. I get that wolves can be hard on livestock in some areas, however if you take out an apex predator in any ecosystem, you are asking for trouble. Historically killing the Cougars (four legged ones) in the Grand Canyon in an effort to improve deer hunting was devastating ( also look up Isle Royale wolves / moose study, the Yellowstone Park Wolf Project... shark culls and the effects on reef and fish populations, etc.). When I am out Halibut fishing and I see someone catch and kill a dogfish I shake my head. They just killed a ton of Salmon in the process. One dogfish eats a lot of Mackerel... Mackerel prey on Salmon...you do the math (worse than seals). We intervene and we f*** with mother nature... we all know it is not nice to "F" with mother nature. As for snakes, one medium sized snake can eat just shy of 200 mice (approx. 9 pounds) in one year. (feel free to google it). That is a lot of mice, and a lot of crop/property damage in itself. When I go anywhere there are rattle snakes I walk around them. I wear appropriate boots/gators in those areas. If it is not possible to steer clear of them I have a long set of snake tongs and I gently move them so we both are safe. If I found one in my house I would get moved. Anyways that is my 2 cents worth.
 
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roadglideguy

Active Member
No fighting words here, just science and trying not to repeat tragic history (watch video on Yellowstone project)… the reason wolf numbers are not properly self regulating is because of human interference... wolf pops. regulate in relation to prey numbers. We have messed with land use and have created an artificial abundance of deer/prey...I like my steak...trust me... but culling a huge number is a disaster.
 

gt

Active Member
No fighting words here, just science and trying not to repeat tragic history (watch video on Yellowstone project)… the reason wolf numbers are not properly self regulating is because of human interference... wolf pops. regulate in relation to prey numbers. We have messed with land use and have created an artificial abundance of deer/prey...I like my steak...trust me... but culling a huge number is a disaster.
nice try at gaslighting, usually does not work on the site.
 

JACKspASS

Active Member
No fighting words here, just science and trying not to repeat tragic history (watch video on Yellowstone project)… the reason wolf numbers are not properly self regulating is because of human interference... wolf pops. regulate in relation to prey numbers. We have messed with land use and have created an artificial abundance of deer/prey...I like my steak...trust me... but culling a huge number is a disaster.

How in the world did big game populations survive in Idaho without wolves? Culling a large number will do didly squat, they will repopulate like they did from a low base # and it will give big game populations a break. Idaho never had massive populations of unhunted elk that needed thinning, so the Yellowstone reference is great for that circumstance, not so much to central and northern idaho.
 

roadglideguy

Active Member
How in the world did big game populations survive in Idaho without wolves? Culling a large number will do didly squat, they will repopulate like they did from a low base # and it will give big game populations a break. Idaho never had massive populations of unhunted elk that needed thinning, so the Yellowstone reference is great for that circumstance, not so much to central and northern idaho.
Big game populations need apex predators...pretty basic...every ecosystem needs one...you can dispute it...sorta like disputing global warming...oh wait...(just teasing)
 

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