Orvis...

smc

Active Member
Isn't it interesting that those usually lecturing us are the ones profiting from the current model.

Complete hypocrisy.
If you are referring to @dustinchromers I believe he makes his living in the timber and has no skin in the manufacturing game.

I do. I am a small U.S. manufacturer. I have to import my raw goods, because they are not available in the U.S.

I could easily and much more affordably import from Asia. But I import from European sources because they are higher quality, and that is what my customer's want.

I would love to source my materials from the U.S., but I don't see that happening in the foreseeable future.

Just to add - I do have fine craftspeople that do the finish work here. I could have that done else where, but choose to do as much as I can in the U.S.

What do you do @Swimmy? Do you have any skin in the game?
 

MT_Flyfisher

Active Member
It never ceases to amaze me how much people buy products based on the name tag as much or more so than on the quality of the product itself.

Part of that, of course, is that when the item is tagged by Orvis, or Patagonia, Simms, etc. people also buy that product because of their knowledge of the customer service that company provides.

During the past few years I‘ve been selling on the internet many of the men’s dress ties that I have acquired over the years but will never wear again (thankfully!). Those having a name brand tag on them, like Ralph Lauren, Burberry, or Brooks Brothers, for example, sell quickly and at a premium price. Others, that have just name tag from the clothing store where they were purchased, or a less popular brand tag, possibly made be the same manufacturer, are difficult to sell at any price even when they are superior to the name brand ties in every way. Go figure!

p.s. I had a couple Abercrombie & Fitch ties with trout prints and flies on them that I sold, and I have a similar one from Orvis with rainbow trout on it that I think I’ll keep. However, no one seems to want a much better quality, beautiful silk Fendi tie, made in Italy. Maybe because it has a spin fishing gear design?
 

tirefire

Active Member
If you are referring to @dustinchromers I believe he makes his living in the timber and has no skin in the manufacturing game.

I do. I am a small U.S. manufacturer. I have to import my raw goods, because they are not available in the U.S.

I could easily and much more affordably import from Asia. But I import from European sources because they are higher quality, and that is what my customer's want.

I would love to source my materials from the U.S., but I don't see that happening in the foreseeable future.

Just to add - I do have fine craftspeople that do the finish work here. I could have that done else where, but choose to do as much as I can in the U.S.

What do you do @Swimmy? Do you have any skin in the game?
That’s admirable, and if I knew what you made and needed such an item would be delighted to give you my business.

I don’t think Swimmy was referring to Dustin, it seemed to me he was commenting on upper level politicians and the like.
 

tirefire

Active Member
It never ceases to amaze me how much people buy products based on the name tag as much or more so than on the quality of the product itself.

Part of that, of course, is that when the item is tagged by Orvis, or Patagonia, Simms, etc. people also buy that product because of their knowledge of the customer service that company provides.

During the past few years I‘ve been selling on the internet many of the men’s dress ties that I have acquired over the years but will never wear again (thankfully!). Those having a name brand tag on them, like Ralph Lauren, Burberry, or Brooks Brothers, for example, sell quickly and at a premium price. Others, that have just name tag from the clothing store where they were purchased, or a less popular brand tag, possibly made be the same manufacturer, are difficult to sell at any price even when they are superior to the name brand ties in every way. Go figure!

p.s. I had a couple Abercrombie & Fitch ties with trout prints and flies on them that I sold, and I have a similar one from Orvis with rainbow trout on it that I think I’ll keep. However, no one seems to want a much better quality, beautiful silk Fendi tie, made in Italy. Maybe because it has a spin fishing gear design?
When I worked in the woods I bought several Filson items, because I knew they’d last and that the customer service would be awesome if I had an issue. The quality remains long after the price has been forgotten with some of the expensive stuff
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
When I worked in the woods I bought several Filson items, because I knew they’d last and that the customer service would be awesome if I had an issue. The quality remains long after the price has been forgotten with some of the expensive stuff

And now Filson is a line in a portfolio of a larger conglomerate and very little of what they produce is made in the states. They still use the American worker as a punchline in their dishonest marketing campaigns though. This is the sad way manufacturing dies in this country.
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
If you are referring to @dustinchromers I believe he makes his living in the timber and has no skin in the manufacturing game.

I do. I am a small U.S. manufacturer. I have to import my raw goods, because they are not available in the U.S.

I could easily and much more affordably import from Asia. But I import from European sources because they are higher quality, and that is what my customer's want.

I would love to source my materials from the U.S., but I don't see that happening in the foreseeable future.

Just to add - I do have fine craftspeople that do the finish work here. I could have that done else where, but choose to do as much as I can in the U.S.

What do you do @Swimmy? Do you have any skin in the game?

I don't think Swimmy is referring to me or denigrating me in any way. However, I do have skin in the game. Yes I'm in timber, this much is true. I'm also from a small dead mill town. Death is the result of unwillingness and inability to change but also and largely in part to the fact we ship the best raw materials "logs" overseas. This cuts the American mill worker out in favor of foreign manufacturing. To further the difficulties in American timber markets we have to compete with a government owned resource and an essentially subsidized timber industry in Canada. Remember the soft woods deal? We got the raw end of it. I'm very much of the opinion that we should steward our forest lands and am not blind to impact. If we are making a negative environmental impact I'm of the opinion that the utilitarian benefits should be with the people that live there. Why log and destroy to let foreign manufacturing net the increased value. I'm all for sending China finished lumber and built goods. I'm not for selling out our resource so those at the very top increase the bottom line at the expense of family wage jobs. Skin in the game I have as I want to see my communites prosper. American manufacturing jobs are part of the backbone of the middle class. Without a strong middle class you have a perilous situation and a massive wealth gap that will continue to grow. We can't all be doctors and lawyers. I honor a Sawyer as I would any other honest profession. And I'll heartily agree that craft goods are an endangered species that should be preserved. The best way is to vote with your dollar and keep them alive.
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
If you are referring to @dustinchromers I believe he makes his living in the timber and has no skin in the manufacturing game.

I do. I am a small U.S. manufacturer. I have to import my raw goods, because they are not available in the U.S.

I could easily and much more affordably import from Asia. But I import from European sources because they are higher quality, and that is what my customer's want.

I would love to source my materials from the U.S., but I don't see that happening in the foreseeable future.

Just to add - I do have fine craftspeople that do the finish work here. I could have that done else where, but choose to do as much as I can in the U.S.

What do you do @Swimmy? Do you have any skin in the game?

Do you care to elaborate on what you produce? I'm always looking to vote with my dollars for American made products, especially if made by someone I have any remote connection to like on this board.
 

DimeBrite

5X Celebrity Jeopardy Champion
Orvis has improved their product line, mainly with the Helios 3 fly rods. I wish them well, but prefer Loomis and Scott fly rods.

Filson is a company that never earned my business. Maybe I would take note if they marketed an oilskin face mask. Too late now I guess.

I want in on the US timber business. Lumber is up 375% year to year. I can work a chain saw and can drive a manual transmission. I also know my tree species and can tell the difference between a Barred Owl and a Spotted Owl. My vision is to market boutique selectively harvested logs for an organic furnishings line up. Your food may be sustainable, but is your furniture? Eh?
 

tirefire

Active Member
And now Filson is a line in a portfolio of a larger conglomerate and very little of what they produce is made in the states. They still use the American worker as a punchline in their dishonest marketing campaigns though. This is the sad way manufacturing dies in this country.
While this is true, the stuff I bought back in the day is still serviceable stuff. I don't cruise timber anymore but it's still solid work wear and dependable stuff for upland hunting, yard work, etc.
 

tirefire

Active Member
I burn only organic, shade grown, fair trade firewood grown right here in the USA, harvested by Americans for Americans...
:)
a young guy i know actually was getting ridiculous per cord prices for firewood he'd list on craigslist as "organic low impact". the low impact was that he only took downed stuff, and a few standing dead.
 

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