Fishers

Tacoma Red

Active Member

I came across one, within just ten yards, while deep in the northern cascades 5 years ago. So incredibly beautiful and it was gone in a flash. I thought at first a type of mink because I was not familiar with this species. On the way back home, I stopped at the ranger station at Wa Pass (Rte. 20) to try to identify it better. After a nice interrogation to be sure I saw what I saw, I was told by the wildlife biologist that there are very few in the state of WA, and that a logging operation would grind to a stop if they encountered one because the pelt was worth much more than a month's wages. Very elusive and I hope they make an unhampered return.
 

atomic dog

Jive Turkey
I was hiking north of Ringold about a month ago and saw a critter scampering away from the trail and down to the river's edge out of sight. It looked and moved like a mink, long, and slinky. It was quite a bit bigger than any mink I've ever seen, though.

Reading the description on the WDFW website, it sure sounds like what I saw. I can't imagine they would be found out there in the desert, though. No idea what it could have been.
 

Gyrfalcon21

Honoring Vets
I was hiking north of Ringold about a month ago and saw a critter scampering away from the trail and down to the river's edge out of sight. It looked and moved like a mink, long, and slinky. It was quite a bit bigger than any mink I've ever seen, though.

Reading the description on the WDFW website, it sure sounds like what I saw. I can't imagine they would be found out there in the desert, though. No idea what it could have been.

Pine Martens inhabit drier regions, generally, than does a Fisher. Just another possibility in the mix.


As we saw last year with the Wolverine on the coast we can throw the rule book out on when and where these crazy weasel-types can show up. Coloration within species varies to match the terrain. Males are bigger in the weasel bunch, females smaller, making ID by size tougher.

Always great to see our weasels!
 
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CreekScrambler

Active Member
They’re such cool critters. Real deal killing machines and they punch far above their weight. It’s great to have more reports of sightings and hopefully we get more chances to spot them out in the wild.
 

NukeLDO

WFF Supporter
We had them when I lived in Maine. Those things scream like a woman being murdered. First time I heard it, jumped out of bed and ran outside with the flashlight to see who was being killed in my driveway....nothing there. Happened repeatedly until I learned what I was hearing. They like to catch squirrels, cats, and chipmunks brave enough to venture out after dark. Only saw one in 12 years up there though.
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
So, is there a difference between a fisher and what we used to call a pole-cat in Vermont?
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
We had them when I lived in Maine. Those things scream like a woman being murdered. First time I heard it, jumped out of bed and ran outside with the flashlight to see who was being killed in my driveway....nothing there. Happened repeatedly until I learned what I was hearing. They like to catch squirrels, cats, and chipmunks brave enough to venture out after dark. Only saw one in 12 years up there though.
I've heard that scream! Blood curdling!
 

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