Whidbey Island for a few days

hossross

New Member
Hey everyone,

Long story short, my aunt and uncle live on Whidbey Island and I'm flying out to visit them with my wife and little boy from June 20-28. We live in North Carolina, so I'm used to small mountain streams (where I grew up) and coastal fishing (where we live now). My boy, while he loves to "fish" isn't quite old enough to take on a guided trip yet, so I'm looking at escaping for a few hours here and there to fish some of the lakes close to them (Deer, Goss, Lone - they're in Langley).

One of their friends has generously offered for me to borrow a belly boat for the outings. I talked to him a bit about rod size and some patterns. I'm planning to pack my 6wt with a floating line and a sink tip line, and some leech patterns, chironomids, and maybe throw in some deceivers/clousers.

Can anyone give me any ideas of what colors are better out there in the northwest, or anything else I should bring with me? Thanks for any help!
 

dp

~El Pescador
hale bop looking patterns in olive and black on intermediate line for Lone - done quite well just trolling them around
 

hossross

New Member
Thanks for all the replies. I've ordered up some materials to tie some Olive Willys before I head out.

I see mentions for intermediate lines. Currently I've got the aforementioned floating and sink tip lines. I do have a full sink line on another real I could pack, but no intermediate. Is it enough of a game changer to try to get one ordered in and spooled up or can I make do with my full sink (type 6) and my sink tip?

Thanks!
 

hossross

New Member
If you're used to coastal fishing, I might recommend checking out some of the public beaches on Whidbey for some salt water fun. Pretty sure sea run cutties are open year round in all of the marine areas around Whidbey.
Still good with a 6wt on these? I can pack my saltwater 8wt gear if need be.
 

dp

~El Pescador
Lone averages 10-12 feet deep. I can get to the bottom with my intermediate with a slow kick.
I would think a full sink will get there and stay there in the weeds - too heavy?

Then again, what do I know.....:)
 

Nooksack Mac

Active Member
Lines: Much depends on the contours of the lake. In swampy-shallow lakes, or in any lake where the fish are paying attention to the surface and/or a few feet down, use your floater. In lakes deeper than about twenty feet, where nothing's happening on the surface, fish your deep six or seven. Much of the time, trout are 8-16 feet deep, where the water is safe, well oxygenated and biologically healthy, flog-em with your intermediate or slow sinking line.
 

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