NFR Had to put my 17 year old Lab-Doxin-Chow mix to sleep yesterday

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
Katie. My constant companion, lover of mtn bike, drift boat, and small stream adventures is gone.
She was a good dog.
My wife and son picked her out at a Bainbridge Island shelter.
She had been ferrel and from Yakima, I found out later we were 6 th family to adopt her,

The first two years were difficult. She was hell on wheels. The first few weeks of owning her my dad and I took her down the Yakima River. I let her out of the boat for a potty break and she immediacy dashed off, probably chasing some poor hapless animal. She was gone a half hour. Great, how do you explain to your then 5 year old son that you had lost his dog? She then re appeared. I did not know whether to scold or praise her. That was the beginning of many shinanigans she pulled on us.

At the time we also had a huge Belgium Sheppard Lab mix. The two of them used to spend hours chasing each other around the back yard to the point they wore out the grass behind my sons swing set.

She was a killer. Embarrassing on a mtn bike rides. Many small animals came to an untimely end due to her sneaky, deadly, and lazer accurate attacks. It is what she did to survive her first year of life, so deeply engrained in her.

But most of all she was a faithful companion. She and I bonded after two years. It happened on one of our trips to S Fork Snoqualmie. We were on a bridge snd I yelled and motioned to her “let’s go”. Unfortunately I made same hand gesture fit “up and over” that I used in my big dog to have him jump over things like downed trees or picknick tables. She was smart, and had seen me play this game with bigger dog, she she sprung up on the jersey barrier, my heart sank because she woulg have fslken approx 30 feet down on large, unforgiving rocks. I was able to grab her to prevent her certain death. That was the moment her and I bonded and my attitude changed about her. She became my favorite girl dog ftim that time, and was till yesterday.

She loved to join me fly fishing small streams. we fished the south fork Snoqualmie a lot in middle of summer. She loved car rides anywhere, and a lot of times she slept. But every time we transitioned from hwy 18 to I-90 East she would wake up and start howling in anticipation of another off leash adventure. I would pet her to try to calm her down, but she showed her enthusiasm by barking, shaking, pressing her little nose up against the glass to get a view of her precious river as we roared past at 70 mph.

Most advenAfternoon to after dark, so she missed her evening meal, so we stopped at McDonald’s for her to get a cheap cheeseburger, man she loved that.

old age is hell. She fought old age with a lions heart. Her mind went. She could see and hear maybe 20 percent. She lost a lot of weight and her joints were sore. But she still loved to go on walks. I took her for her final walk around the block yesterday morning before taking her in to vet to be put down. She so appreciated getting out of the house. She could still smell things and I was extra patient with her stopping to sniff each squirrel, rabbit, rat or racoon scent trail. I think deep in her heart she was thinking she could once again chase and harass those animals like her younger years.
So this has been a tough year. Covid isolation, then lost my cousin, then lost my job, my best fly fishing buddy divorced his wife and moved 14 hours away, lost my dad and now my favorite pooch.

But things are turning. I still have a great Lab Boxer Blue Healer 11 year old dog who is very smart/loving. Both dogs were a wonderful support and loved walks during covid. My wife and son are vaccinated and healthy. I am going to camp, meet MG Tom to chase rainbows in new to me skinny water this week. Ihave green light to job search again. Life is good. Sumner is here. Dry fly fishing skinny western WA water with my new favorite dog is right around the corner
 
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Rob Allen

Active Member
Katie. My constant companion, lover of mtn bike, drift boat, and small stream adventures is gone.
She was a good dog.
My wife and son picked her out at a Bainbridge Island shelter.
She had been ferrel and from Yakima, I found out later we were 6 th family to adopt her,

The first two years were difficult. She was hell on wheels. The first few weeks of owning her my dad and I took her down the Yakima River. I let her out of the boat for a potty break and she immediacy dashed off, probably chasing some poor hapless animal. She was gone a half hour. Great, how do you explain to your then 5 year old son that you had lost his dog? She then re appeared. I did not know whether to scold or praise her. That was the beginning of many shinanigans she pulled on us.

At the time we also had a huge Belgium Sheppard Lab mix. The two of them used to spend hours chasing each other around the back yard to the point they wore out the grass behind my sons swing set.

She was a killer. Embarrassing on a mtn bike rides. Many small animals came to an untimely end due to her sneaky, deadly, and lazer accurate attacks. It is what she did to survive her first year of life, so deeply engrained in her.

But most of all she was a faithful companion. She and I bonded after two years. It happened on one of our trips to S Fork Snoqualmie. We were on a bridge snd I yelled and motioned to her “let’s go”. Unfortunately I made same hand gesture fit “up and over” that I used in my big dog to have him jump over things like downed trees or picknick tables. She was smart, and had seen me play this game with bigger dog, she she sprung up on the jersey barrier, my heart sank because she woulg have fslken approx 30 feet down on large, unforgiving rocks. I was able to grab her to prevent her certain death. That was the moment her and I bonded and my attitude changed about her. She became my favorite girl dog ftim that time, and was till yesterday.

She loved to join me fly fishing small streams. we fished the south fork Snoqualmie a lot in middle of summer. She loved car rides anywhere, and a lot of times she slept. But every time we transitioned from hwy 18 to I-90 East she would wake up and start howling in anticipation of another off leash adventure. I would pet her to try to calm her down, but she showed her enthusiasm by barking, shaking, pressing her little nose up against the glass to get a view of her precious river as we roared past at 70 mph.

Most advenAfternoon to after dark, so she missed her evening meal, so we stopped at McDonald’s for her to get a cheap cheeseburger, man she loved that.

old age is hell. She fought old age with a lions heart. Her mind went. She could see and hear maybe 20 percent. She lost a lot of weight and her joints were sore. But she still loved to go on walks. I took her for her final walk around the block yesterday morning before taking her in to vet to be put down. She so appreciated getting out of the house. She could still smell things and I was extra patient with her stopping to sniff each squirrel, rabbit, rat or racoon scent trail. I think deep in her heart she was thinking she could once again chase and harass those animals like her younger years.
So this has been a tough year. Covid isolation, then lost my cousin, then lost my job, my best fly fishing buddy divorced his wife and moved 14 hours away, lost my dad and now my favorite pooch.

But things are turning. I still have a great Lab Boxer Blue Healer 11 year old dog who is very smart/loving. Both dogs were a wonderful support and loved walks during covid. My wife and son are vaccinated and healthy. I am going to camp, meet MG Tom to chase rainbows in new to me skinny water this week. Ihave green light to job search again. Life is good. Sumner is here. Dry fly fishing skinny western WA water with my new favorite dog is right around the corner
Very sorry
 

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
If anyone is reading this and needs to put a dog down, here are a couple of things that might help.

1. pay ahead of time. This prevents you from having to stick around in the emotional time afterwards. I learned this the hard way as a teenager. I was able to call my vet and pay over the phone when I made my appointment

2. Due to covid shortages, my vet was not able to use his normal ethinsia drug. The substitute drug some times causes the dead body to jump or shake. That is distressing, so he encouraged me to be with my dog if I wanted when he put the sedative in her catheter. So was able to hold her as she peacefully fell asleep. The vet took her to another room to add the drug to her her catheter to put her down. They bright her to me in a cardboard box. They thoughtfully taped her collar to the top. And they layed her on an absorbsnt pad to keep from soiling the car on the ride home.

3. Dig grave ahead of time. My wife kept bugging me last spring to dig a grave but my heart could not take it. I finally caved in and dug the grave. My wife helped dig the last bit. Just as I was asking my wife if she thought it was big enough, Katie walked over to see what was. Going on and most likely wanted to score a few earth worms. Well, since she was almost blind she walked/fell right in proving I had made it long wide and deep enough. Ha ha.
having the grave pre dug and having put the loose dirt on tarp, then covering the dirt with another tarp made the burial process much less stressful

I used Sumner Veteranty hospital and was very impressed with them. My wife had taken Katie to them 3 years ago when her leg was broken in an altercation with our other dog.
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
I am very sorry to hear of your loss of Katie, and your tough year. What a wonderful picture you framed of a companion you were able to spend so many years with! I hope you'll always vividly remember the time you shared together. I also hope that you find the job of your dreams, and that this year of COVID and bitter disappointments will quickly fade into the fog of age.

Rescues are such dichotomy. Early on we struggle with their behavior, and spend endless hours trying to train the feral out of them. For sooo long there will be many @&^$* then suddenly a bright spot; maybe a breakthrough-highpoint, then more @&^$* . We learn how to work with their unrefinement and see results we're hoping for. At some point we both mellow and learn to live together in a state of equilibrium. But all this time they are so grateful we've given them a safe home, they’re no longer having pangs of hunger for days. We spend time with them, show them affection, and they love us so much for it; we see their gratefulness and devotion to us in their eyes. The years go by, and they slow down. We go on slower, shorter, walks and they follow us around the home because they just want to be near us. We can tell they're in pain but they never let out a whimper. I wish I was that tough.

I wish dogs aged in human years.
I can only imagine the training phase lasting 20+ years.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
Sorry for your loss. I know having to have a dog put down is very sad. I took my granddaughters Bishon to be put to sleep and then cremated. Plus in my many years here on earth, I buried a few dogs, snakes, lizards, and cats.
 

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
I am very sorry to hear of your loss of Katie, and your tough year. What a wonderful picture you framed of a companion you were able to spend so many years with! I hope you'll always vividly remember the time you shared together. I also hope that you find the job of your dreams, and that this year of COVID and bitter disappointments will quickly fade into the fog of age.

Rescues are such dichotomy. Early on we struggle with their behavior, and spend endless hours trying to train the feral out of them. For sooo long there will be many @&^$* then suddenly a bright spot; maybe a breakthrough-highpoint, then more @&^$* . We learn how to work with their unrefinement and see results we're hoping for. At some point we both mellow and learn to live together in a state of equilibrium. But all this time they are so grateful we've given them a safe home, they’re no longer having pangs of hunger for days. We spend time with them, show them affection, and they love us so much for it; we see their gratefulness and devotion to us in their eyes. The years go by, and they slow down. We go on slower, shorter, walks and they follow us around the home because they just want to be near us. We can tell they're in pain but they never let out a whimper. I wish I was that tough.


I can only imagine the training phase lasting 20+ years.
Wow, you are very insightful. Katie followed me everywhere after getting up between 9 and noon. She was in so much pain I had to steady her for the first 4 or 5 steps of the morning. Then she was back to bed like clockwork between 7 and 8:30 pm, worn out for the day. She never complained about getting old or the sire joints, she just musseled through it. I think her rough puppy hood made her tough, a survivor. She still found ways to break into the kitty food and kitty nuggets even in her weakened state. She also as of last week broke through barriers I had erected in the hall of the laundry room to keep her off the new carpet of the front room. I tried several variants, each one failed to the hard headed ness of an elderly dog with too much time on her hands and a steel trap mind that thought she could do anything. She could barely stand up, but she must have kicked her adrenaline into high gear to force her frail body to mow over card tables braced by heavy bags of wood pellets for pellet stove. I admired her determination and naughtiness right to the very day she passed.
 

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