New Vid: Solo - Reflections on fishing alone

Nick Clayton

WFF Supporter
Wow thanks Nick I appreciate the compliment! I definetly lost a bit of steam on this one, shot it in Feb ... released in June. I find editing is the hardest when I haven't any idea of what the story/theme of the video is going to be. I try and find some sort of theme or story to tell, but sometimes I get back and I'm like "wow what do I do with this stuff". Then I find myself browsing the site where I get my music hoping to get inspired by some track. I'll spend nights just re-arranging clips to see if a story emerges. When I have done some pre-planning, then the editing goes so much quicker which isn't surprising :D.


Yeah I can relate. 5 years ago I brought gopros on every single charter trip I tool, and took an absurd amount of footage. Almost 2 TB worth. I had planned to make a couple vids....a tuna fishing vid, and a "day in the life of a deckhand" vid. After I got home after the season I opened up the external hard drive I stored all the footage on and began going thru what I had, just trying to separate the stuff I would use for the vids from the useless footage. Just that sorting process took me hours and it really took the steam out of my motivation.

Once it was sorted there was still soooooooo much work to do to even get to the point of editing, so I eventually just became overwhelmed and gave up. That footage still sits on that hard drive lol.

Editing is something I really wish I could get good at, but I just don't have the time to even begin down that path.
 

msteudel

Mark Steudel
Yeah I can relate. 5 years ago I brought gopros on every single charter trip I tool, and took an absurd amount of footage. Almost 2 TB worth. I had planned to make a couple vids....a tuna fishing vid, and a "day in the life of a deckhand" vid. After I got home after the season I opened up the external hard drive I stored all the footage on and began going thru what I had, just trying to separate the stuff I would use for the vids from the useless footage. Just that sorting process took me hours and it really took the steam out of my motivation.

Once it was sorted there was still soooooooo much work to do to even get to the point of editing, so I eventually just became overwhelmed and gave up. That footage still sits on that hard drive lol.

Editing is something I really wish I could get good at, but I just don't have the time to even begin down that path.

Wow yeah 2 tb of footage to go through is a lot! For me gopro footage is the hardest to go through. You just end up rolling for long periods of time trying to capture something interesting, so you end up scrubbing through 15 minutes of you casting.

Making films with just a gopro is tough. First I think taking it off of it's ultra wide setting is a must. It's hard to make something interesting with a single super wide angle view. People make some awesome videos with gopros (or lots of them) but I feel like they usually are sponoserd by gopro and are professional extreme sports people and have a bunch of different gopros they get to use.

As far as figuring out how to cull that footage down. One suggestion is to find a really interesting clip and then build a story around that. Don't get constrained that by the timeline you shot it on. As long as the clips don't break the illusion of the story I'll mix footage all the time. It also helps once you have your clip to then try and sketch out the story arc. Once you kinda know your climax you can build how to get the user there.

The film before this one, First Time Out, that's how I ended up building that story. I had this funny continuous shot of me up on this log trying to get untangled and land the fish. Once I had that I tried to figure out how to make a story around it, going through the rest of the footage I noticed we had some other funny mistakes and that story just sorta grew from there.

Sorry this is turning into an essay, but another method I use is to find the music first. That really helps dictate the kind of edit I go with. Fast and Frenetic or slow paced and soothing. So when I have video-editing-block, I'll browse tracks looking for something I like then put some clips to it and see if I like what comes out sometimes that helps.

But really the most efficient way I've found is to have a plan BEFORE you head out. On shoots where I actually have done some preplanning, the edit is a breeze and I can knock a basic edit out in a couple of evenings. The Gift of Time video, where I shot it with my friend who survived prostate cancer, I had a whole shot list, and we had a rough script and outline of what we wanted to do. We endded up shooting it in an afternoon and I was able to put the rough draft together in a couple of evenings.

Anyway I'll stop rambling, but those are some things I do when trying to build my videos. Sometimes they are just a "music video" with no real story other than people going to fish, fishing, and catching fish, other times I'm able to come up with some sort story beyond that.
 

sleestak240

Active Member
I was lucky enough to inherit a second one from a friend of a friend, his is even older than mine, and it's still in great working condition. I do usually try and armor all it at the beginning or end of the season (watch out if you have wood floors not to get it on the floor and slip and fall). Also another note, I've been using the included foot pump for years (praying it doesn't break on me) but I recently used the kpumps that whitewater rafters use, OMG, get one of those, they are so much faster and feel bullet proof.
Get one of the cheapie 12V or battery powered air mattress pumps and rig the Halkey-Roberts adapter to the end of the hose. They don't have enough pressure to inflate the valve while it's locked, but unlock it and inflate it via the electric pump and then pull the adapter and quickly lock the valve (you'll lose a tiny bit of air, but once you're good at it it's minimal). You'll get the boat filled 90% in about one minute and then you can top it off manually. Been doing it this way for years. The foot pump is basically worthless except if you're a glutton for punishment or hauling it in someplace.
 

Krusty

Outta Here
Very well done, and quite enjoyable!

Watching most gopro videos reminds me of the 1960's excruciating torture of being subjected to three hours of somebody's European vacation slideshow.
 
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cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Supporter
Wow yeah 2 tb of footage to go through is a lot! For me gopro footage is the hardest to go through. You just end up rolling for long periods of time trying to capture something interesting, so you end up scrubbing through 15 minutes of you casting.

Making films with just a gopro is tough. First I think taking it off of it's ultra wide setting is a must. It's hard to make something interesting with a single super wide angle view. People make some awesome videos with gopros (or lots of them) but I feel like they usually are sponoserd by gopro and are professional extreme sports people and have a bunch of different gopros they get to use.

As far as figuring out how to cull that footage down. One suggestion is to find a really interesting clip and then build a story around that. Don't get constrained that by the timeline you shot it on. As long as the clips don't break the illusion of the story I'll mix footage all the time. It also helps once you have your clip to then try and sketch out the story arc. Once you kinda know your climax you can build how to get the user there.

The film before this one, First Time Out, that's how I ended up building that story. I had this funny continuous shot of me up on this log trying to get untangled and land the fish. Once I had that I tried to figure out how to make a story around it, going through the rest of the footage I noticed we had some other funny mistakes and that story just sorta grew from there.

Sorry this is turning into an essay, but another method I use is to find the music first. That really helps dictate the kind of edit I go with. Fast and Frenetic or slow paced and soothing. So when I have video-editing-block, I'll browse tracks looking for something I like then put some clips to it and see if I like what comes out sometimes that helps.

But really the most efficient way I've found is to have a plan BEFORE you head out. On shoots where I actually have done some preplanning, the edit is a breeze and I can knock a basic edit out in a couple of evenings. The Gift of Time video, where I shot it with my friend who survived prostate cancer, I had a whole shot list, and we had a rough script and outline of what we wanted to do. We endded up shooting it in an afternoon and I was able to put the rough draft together in a couple of evenings.

Anyway I'll stop rambling, but those are some things I do when trying to build my videos. Sometimes they are just a "music video" with no real story other than people going to fish, fishing, and catching fish, other times I'm able to come up with some sort story beyond that.
Hi Nick,
Mark's point about pre-planning the story that you wish to tell is a great one. The 2TB that you already have in the can is B-roll, the visual elements that spice up your overall video. The A roll is you talking directly to camera and telling a story. Pick an easy, straightforward story to start. Your goal is to make a 5 - 15 minute video; the time will fly by faster than you ever thought, especially as you add in some B roll material and just cool video/still images. I think that folks would love to see fishing and the ocean from your perspective.
Steve
P.S. I need to heed my own words and start completing my own online projects...
 

msteudel

Mark Steudel
Get one of the cheapie 12V or battery powered air mattress pumps and rig the Halkey-Roberts adapter to the end of the hose. They don't have enough pressure to inflate the valve while it's locked, but unlock it and inflate it via the electric pump and then pull the adapter and quickly lock the valve (you'll lose a tiny bit of air, but once you're good at it it's minimal). You'll get the boat filled 90% in about one minute and then you can top it off manually. Been doing it this way for years. The foot pump is basically worthless except if you're a glutton for punishment or hauling it in someplace.
We have a portable paddleboard pump that would do the whole thing, but sometimes I just like cutting out extraneous stuff. (I feel like I already bring way too much stuff) The pump is something I bring anyway, but 1 min sounds nice vs the 10 minutes it takes me to fill up the boat by foot.
 

sroffe

Active Member
Nice video Mark. I always enjoy your work.
I totally agree about how hard it is to sort through footage to get a short video. To much is overwhelming and to little is frustrating.

My video clips are about 1 minute, and get posted to Instagram. Not sure they’re worthy enough for WFF.
 

msteudel

Mark Steudel
Nice video Mark. I always enjoy your work.
I totally agree about how hard it is to sort through footage to get a short video. To much is overwhelming and to little is frustrating.

My video clips are about 1 minute, and get posted to Instagram. Not sure they’re worthy enough for WFF.
I’d love to see them! Mind sharing your IG?
 

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