Activity on Lake Sammamish at midnight?

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
That cutthroat eat smolt is simply a fact. I don't think anyone is proposing removing them, as they're both native and a valuable fishery which is also put at risk by the invasive spiney rays.
I love bass fishing, but aside from impacts on the somewhat questionable salmon hatchery, there's also the very threatened native and unique kokanee populations in Lake Samm to consider.

Perch and rock bass populations in Sammamish have exploded, also, and are potentially a bigger problem than the LM/SM.

They have taken a few larger cutts in their net fishing. I guess those would be considered bycatch.
I don’t think anyone is proposing to remove them as well, but they always manage to take blame for eating smolts or for the decline in salmon numbers in just about every article regarding this subject. It just seems ridiculous to me that they continue to point fingers at native cutts for doing what they naturally do.....
SF
 

Northern

It's all good.
WFF Supporter
They have taken a few larger cutts in their net fishing. I guess those would be considered bycatch.
I don’t think anyone is proposing to remove them as well, but they always manage to take blame for eating smolts or for the decline in salmon numbers in just about every article regarding this subject. It just seems ridiculous to me that they continue to point fingers at native cutts for doing what they naturally do.....
SF
Haha - maybe the biologists need to reframe that particular statement of fact, to head off spiney ray enthusiast arguments as well as those of us with a soft spot for cutties:
"Uncontrolled spiney ray predation reduces both smolt survival and available smolt forage base for native fish" :)
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
Thanks for the replies. I assume the electrofishing boat sends a shock into the lake and they count the number of fish that float up after they do this? For a big lake like Sammamish, would the purpose to just get a count of predatory fish (bass, etc), that are hanging around near shore?
Depends on who is doing the work and why. The purpose could be for conducting a fish survey and see what species are present and get an idea of their numbers. The survey could be narrowed down a bit to target warmwater species. The lake could have been surveyed many years ago and they may be checking to see if the population assemblage has changed.

Fyi...in a standardized survey, the lake is divided into sections and for each section, the boat sends a current into the water for 600 seconds as it moves along. Shocking normally occurs fairly close to shore. The anodes are attached to long poles at the bow of the boat.
 

Dawg

Active Member
Bruce, thanks for the explanation. Definitely learned something...the boat doing the shocking as quite a bit bigger than the one in the photo, but similar in style.
 

Gyrfalcon21

Active Member
A bit more of my experience with sampling and what we were doing. It was a job of coordinates and timed captures like Bruce added above. Numbers studies. When everyone was ready you'd drop the metal feelers, hit the power switch and the fish either shot out of the water or rolled belly up. A netter was a job to have. Whitefish were the one fish that had a higher mortality rate it seemed than others..

We also took some fish and either harvested whole or took their stomachs and put in Formalin to preserve for later. Later was Winter in lab and that entailed huffing that Formilin with a stereo microscope while counting creatures the fish ate. Great way to learn about the different nymphs of different mayflies or damsels. Pretty monotonous when you get thousands.

We had a smaller Bull Trout in a tank in the lab that was fed goldfish. Sure beat my former job of vacuuming the school library at midnight!

 
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Brian Caud

WFF Supporter
Passed a pickup towing a boat last night in Issaquah about 830pm. Looked very similar to the boat in the video a couple posts above. The truck had what looked to be the Muckleshoot tribe logo on the door.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
The last time I saw a large metallic object with lots of bright lights moving around at midnight I woke up in a corn field 500 miles away.

That’s got to be pretty much how the fish feel after getting electroshocked. It sucks to be a fish.
 

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
A bit more of my experience with sampling and what we were doing. It was a job of coordinates and timed captures like Bruce added above. Numbers studies. When everyone was ready you'd drop the metal feelers, hit the power switch and the fish either shot out of the water or rolled belly up. A netter was a job to have. Whitefish were the one fish that had a higher mortality rate it seemed than others..

We also took some fish and either harvested whole or took their stomachs and put in Formalin to preserve for later. Later was Winter in lab and that entailed huffing that Formilin with a stereo microscope while counting creatures the fish ate. Great way to learn about the different nymphs of different mayflies or damsels. Pretty monotonous when you get thousands.

We had a smaller Bull Trout in a tank in the lab that was fed goldfish. Sure beat my former job of vacuuming the school library at midnight!

Days with the pack on shocking were certainly a good time. Ran into a few of these (Pacific Giant Salamander I think). They react quite a bit differently to the shock than the fish do...felt bad every time we wrestled one up. Cool animals.
1623445492651.png
 

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