Damsel heaven

triploidjunkie

Active Member
Some times it all comes together. After a whirlwind of a weekend that seemed like it lasted longer than the work week, I had a Sunday to go to my happy place. One of my best fishing buddies I haven't fished with for almost two years was in town, wanting to fish Rufus and Omak. But the website to get the permits was down, as usual, and the offices were all closed. He was ready to turn around and go home in frustration and anger, but I sent him to my happy place. When I finally met up with him on Sunday, I stumbled into one of my best dry fly days ever. At the first lake I landed over two dozen brookies in less than two hours on a little blue dry damsel. They would literally launch clear of the water after them, missing completely half the time.
The next lake the hatch took a little while to warm up, but when it did... I landed 8 big browns, 2 big tiger trout, and one rainbow. I never switched flies. I would only swap it out for the same one when it got too chewed up. I went through four. It was really fun to fish with another human again, too.
I've always heard and read about that kind of success on damsel dries, watched videos, but have only had it happen to me once when the big boys come out to play.
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jwg

Active Member
None that aren't chewed beyond recognition. I'll post a pic as soon as I tie another, which after this weekend will be soon.
Were you sight fishing, casting to reeds, over near surface weed beds?

I’ll be interested in your pattern, even more interested in presentation.

J
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
That's awesome. I can why you callout the happy place. I'd be happy there too. Well done and thanks for sharing.
 

triploidjunkie

Active Member
Were you sight fishing, casting to reeds, over near surface weed beds?

I’ll be interested in your pattern, even more interested in presentation.

J
Most the browns were tight against shore or reeds, where you had to have pinpoint casts. An inch or two made a difference. It was almost like carp fishing. You had to ignore all the chaos of rising fish all around you, and target specific feeders tight to structure. You could gauge which direction they were going, and get a fly in front of them. The open water fish were unpredictable. They could turn and go any direction after the last rise.
The brookies were so keyed up and going crazy, it didn't really matter where you fished, edges or open water. Your dry didn't float for long before something exploded on it!
 

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