Wet wadin' footwear recommendations?

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Premium
I stick with my regular wading boots (Orvis Pro Boas studded) with a couple of additions. Thick merino socks plus neoprene booties plus an extra insole to eat up extra space inside the boot. I also have a pair of Korkers that I'll use from time to time but they're not nearly as good as the Orvis boots over the course of a day.
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
As somebody who wet wades from June to September for steelhead I can swear by regular boots with wading specific neoprene wading sock. Not socks that just go up but the kind that fold over to make gravel guards.

They are basically the same thickness as wader booties so your normal boots should fit fine.

If wading a bit deep you can fold them up so they go to your knees. Basically you are good unless you go more than crotch deep.

Protip: Snowboarding socks are extra comfy. They are made for wearing that kind of boot and have padding in all the right places, especially the calf area.
 

Zak

WFF Premium
As somebody who wet wades from June to September for steelhead I can swear by regular boots with wading specific neoprene wading sock. Not socks that just go up but the kind that fold over to make gravel guards.

They are basically the same thickness as wader booties so your normal boots should fit fine.

If wading a bit deep you can fold them up so they go to your knees. Basically you are good unless you go more than crotch deep.

Protip: Snowboarding socks are extra comfy. They are made for wearing that kind of boot and have padding in all the right places, especially the calf area.
That's what I do, too.
 

landlocked

Active Member
CHOTA CHOTA CHOTA… STL plus. I’ve posted here in the past that they are unsurpassed for ease of getting on and off foot and good ankle support. Getting harder to find. Not light but the benefits outweigh a few ounces heavier!!! Do yourself a favor and get a pair. This is over 12-years of wearing them (2-pair, 80-plus days a year).
 

cdnred

Active Member
The boots hurt my feet, I only covered about half as much shoreline as I wanted. Yesterday I hit a lake with @Engee, I traded the Danner's for an old pair of broken down Brooks The Beast (a running shoe). I should have thrown The Beast away a few years ago but sometimes I'm a cheap old man. Anyway, my feet were tired and sore after about two miles of wet wading. Time for a better wadin' shoe.
Are your feet getting sore due to lack of ankle support or your feet getting sore needing a more comfortable insole..? Whether the water is cold or warm, your feet will react the same under either condition. I'm thinking due to the sore feet, you'd be best to look at getting a pair of boots to give you some ankle support rather then flimsy pair of runners..
 

CreekScrambler

Active Member
A good set of wool socks under wet-wading neoprene socks helps a ton when it comes to filling out the boot and protecting your feet.

The only issue I run into when wet wading is fatiguing my hip flexors due to extra hiking/clambering around in waterlogged boots all day. Lighter boots that actually drain are great if the sole and ankle support is stout enough. I had some OLD (ca. 2002) Simms Freestones that were perfect wet waders until they croaked last summer.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
This has been an interesting read for me on opinions of this shoe, this boot and even this sandal. I have worn old running shoes, LL Bean wading boots, the Danner studded felts, Redington felts, two different Teva sandals (no more, almost lost a toenail with the exposed toe) and several pair of cheap "water shoes". Sucking mud and cheap water shoes? Nope. Velcro closure Teva's and sucking mud? Nope. Studded wading boots when you're trying to sneak across a basalt ledge on a feeding carp? Nope. Buckle closure Teva's picking up rocks all day (and that toenail thing). Nope.

Lots of opinions and options, thanks everyone! Some very good insights.
 

BearBio

Active Member
As a retired Fish and Wildlife Biologist, I realize that many people can't afford new footwear but I am opposed to felt soles due to the possibility of transplanting "rock snot".

So said, I have a set of Korkers with the dial in tightening. Fit nice and provide additional support when walking trails, as well as streams. If felt is really needed, I have felt over soles and dry them thoroughly!
 
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