Gear Orvis Pro Approach or Simms Lighwight Felt wet wading shoes

Questions about flyfishing gear, camping gear, whatever.

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I like my sandals for the lower elevation stuff, but the rubber soles do slide on the algee edges and they certainly are not suitable to the pocketwater and thick brush edges like where I was yesterday. I like the Korker boots I got last spring and have come to really like the felt soles, I wore them yesterday, although I bet they would feel better with a neopreme sock to take up space. Might just do that, but I want something less clunky.
Looking for a shoe. One issue is I'm a true 9.5, narrow heel, high arch, like a big (not too) toebox. FYI Keens don't fit me, addidas are ok, Sperrys fit great. Also I can't go try them without a few hour drive.
I mentioned in another thread I was curious about the Orvis Approach Shoe . I'm familar with michelin sticky rubber from racing so I was wondering how well these do on the algee covered rocks.
I was also looking at a felt sole, I like the grip. I'm a little concerened about wear as I notice I'm wearing the Korker felt pretty good. 0.5-2mi of river, usually with an equal walk on trail or roads, several times a week. I though the Simms Flyweight Felt might be something to try. I realise I will be refelting but the sure grip makes me feel safer.
I know they are both low tops, but if anyone knows which feels more supportive I'd like to know.
I've done Keds, shoes with carpet glued on, ect. I'd rather do boots than those, but I think I want a shoe. Thanks in advance
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
WFF Supporter
I'm either in my Chavo sandals or my felt bottom wading boots with a neoprene fold over sock. I has sticky rubber boots when Vermont briefly outlawed felt and went down hard several times wearing them on slimy rocks. For algae covered rocks, I think felt, felt with studs, or aluminum bars are the way to go.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I have come to the conclusion from forum member input (and my own stumbling around) (https://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/index.php?threads/165825/) that wading shoes/boots/sandals are a lot like fly rods - one pair ain't enough. I have three pairs of wading boots, two of them are studded (one felt, one LL Bean tacky rubber), the third pair are un-studded felt.

For me, this time of year, I'm stalking carp and I've come to the conclusion I'm scaring or at least warning carp something is near with the noise the studs make basalt and loose rock.

Good luck, Tom!
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Protect your feet and ankles by wearing boots and neoprene socks of the proper thickness. I wear felt soles or felt with studs. Usually the later. I do not want to ruin a trip wearing anything less...
After this week I agree, boots supply more support and ankle protection. Going to look at Neoprene socks like you mentioned. With the felt I just wish I could get up a small scree or pine needle covered bank without sliding back down into the water.
 

Rocking Chair Fan

No more hot spotting
There is additional advise in the other thread also about socks and neoprene. IMHO keeping rocks, gravel and sand out of the boot is of great importance. I have some neoprene cuffs that zip up that go over/outside the socks and over the top of boot to accomplish that. It works well...
 

PV_Premier

Active Member
Same problem for me. I hate hiking in and out in wading boots. Last season I was wearing sneakers for the hike and carrying my boots in the backpack in and out. Too heavy, especially on the way out. I am looking for either a lighter weight carry in/out solution for wet wading, or something I can wear on the hike in and out as well as in the water.

I considered both of those options as well as doing a DIY stud job on some old Keens. Not sure yet but time is of the essence as it's now tributary season in full force.
 

Mrdiecky

Salmonid DDS
Used the approach shoes. As some of you know i broke my leg and tore a lot of stuff in my left knee last year. The leg is finally getting back to normal, but my balance isnt what it used to be. Well these shoe provided excellent traction on the wet rock, slimy rocks and on dry land. Nice wide sole so you always feel stable. Definitely worth the money IMHO.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Used the approach shoes. As some of you know i broke my leg and tore a lot of stuff in my left knee last year. The leg is finally getting back to normal, but my balance isnt what it used to be. Well these shoe provided excellent traction on the wet rock, slimy rocks and on dry land. Nice wide sole so you always feel stable. Definitely worth the money IMHO.
Thx for the feedback.
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
Used the approach shoes. As some of you know i broke my leg and tore a lot of stuff in my left knee last year. The leg is finally getting back to normal, but my balance isnt what it used to be. Well these shoe provided excellent traction on the wet rock, slimy rocks and on dry land. Nice wide sole so you always feel stable. Definitely worth the money IMHO.
I was really amazed at how well the Michelin sole grips when I wore them for the first time.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I was really amazed at how well the Michelin sole grips when I wore them for the first time.
Good to know. I realize at this point I'm going to use up the Korker felt in 1/2 a season. But I do like the grip, that's why I keep putting them on. I feel safe. I think many days a shoe will work, so we'll see. The footware selection will be right up there with the number of rods, the right piece of equipment for the day. I notice the simms rubber sole will take studs, interesting that orvis feels the compond does well enough. I did like michelin bike tires for the grip factor.
 
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