PNW Offshore 2021

SilverFly

Active Member
(Guy), I’m not up on this weather/water temp thing, so what do you think about this?

Meanwhile, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) neutral conditions are favoured for the remainder of the northern hemisphere summer, the NWS's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) said in its monthly forecast.

There is about a 60% chance of ENSO neutral conditions for the July-September season, and a 70% chance of La Niña from November through January 2022, the CPC said.

The ENSO weather pattern is marked by average long-term ocean temperatures, tropical rainfall and atmospheric winds.

Hi Al,

I'm really not sure what it means - other than this appears to be well outside "normal" (whatever that is). But yeah, the heat anomaly in the N Pacific does not appear to be ENSO related.

I'd be more inclined to say this is a PDO thing but according to NOAA, the PDO has been - and continues to be in "cool" phase:


This is super confusing given the entire North Pacific is affected by extreme warm SST anomaly?! Some professional deciphering of this would be great - cuz what I'm seeing ain't "cool".
 

SilverFly

Active Member
Interesting report out of Newport on Saturday:

Still processing all that happened. Long story short, testing of the unidentified fishing object continues. I offer the following without explanation or apologies.

We fished Saturday off Heceta bank on the south end pretty close to the 125 line. The trip began and ended in Newport. 4 on board and 63 mile burn to the target area on 205 magnetic. 600 pounds of ice and 160 gallons of fuel.

We got on site about 8 and actually stopped a little short due to some larger tuna spotted crashing and jumping. They were not albacore. We fished there and doubled on tuna almost right away. our partner boat dropped in also. That was the start of all day scratch and pick at 4 pound tuna with a few 10 to 15. After alot of fun and 27 fish we were working the SW edge of the bank where there is a steep drop and a strong NW SE current we hooked a striped marlin about 6 feet and 100#. The body was pretty deep and we saw him many times as he liked to greyhound. 1/2 the 40 mono on the 4/0 was gone in maybe 60 seconds. I will ask the guys on deck to tell how it all went as I was busy trying to avoid having the boat towed by the marlin which passed the boat and ran away at high speed. After 10 minutes we got some line back and felt like it might actually get to the boat. The fish did another series of greyhound jumps but barely cleared the water unlike the huge jumps he gave at the outset of the battle. You can see what happened next here.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
Did they indicate which tuna they did encounter if they weren't albacore?
Steve
No mention but realistically there's only one choice if they weren't (edit) albacore. However, I am a bit curious about the 4lb tuna mentioned. I would assume they would've notice if they were albacore but maybe they were jack mackerel or fresh BFT arrivals from the E. Pacific. And if they were albies, kinda interesting that much much smaller ones are showing. One more reason I've have my 8pc, 8wt in my boat bag.
 
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cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Premium
No mention but realistically there's only one choice if they weren't bluefin. However, I am a bit curious about the 4lb tuna mentioned. I would assume they would've notice if they were albacore but maybe they were jack mackerel or fresh BFT arrivals from the E. Pacific. And if they were albies, kinda interesting that much much smaller ones are showing. One more reason I've have my 8pc, 8wt in my boat bag.
What they don't say is as interesting as what they said: "We got on site about 8 and actually stopped a little short due to some larger tuna spotted crashing and jumping. They were not albacore." If they were not albacore and they were larger, there are not that many possibilities... Is there a reason why they would be so circumspect?
Steve
 

Bob Smith

WFF Premium
We've encountered small skipjack tuna off Northern California/Southern Oregon coast a couple of different seasons over the years. These fish were in clean, 63 plus degree water and were quite small, 2 or 3 pounds. Here's a buddy of mine with one he caught off Eureka back in 2004.

Skipjack Onokai.jpg
 

SilverFly

Active Member
What they don't say is as interesting as what they said: "We got on site about 8 and actually stopped a little short due to some larger tuna spotted crashing and jumping. They were not albacore." If they were not albacore and they were larger, there are not that many possibilities... Is there a reason why they would be so circumspect?
Steve

Hard to say. I read it as making the point they were confident in a non-albacore ID - and therefore automatically presumed to be bluefin. In theory, bigeye would a remote (at best) possibility, but doubtful BET would be showing at the surface like that in broad daylight. Suspect they completely forgot about the tuna once they hooked the striper.

We've encountered small skipjack tuna off Northern California/Southern Oregon coast a couple of different seasons over the years. These fish were in clean, 63 plus degree water and were quite small, 2 or 3 pounds. Here's a buddy of mine with one he caught off Eureka back in 2004.

View attachment 292192

Amazing to see another fish I know from Baja that far north. The ones we got into in 2019 were around 15# and put up a good fight -even on a 13wt. They were mixed in with some YFT that our pangero said we're easily 100#. My back should probably thank those skippies for intercepting our flies before the big yellowfin had a chance.

Added skipjack to the PNW exotic list!
 

Bob Smith

WFF Premium
I'm not aware of any BET documented north of Cape Mendocino. The most recent I can recall came during the 82-83 El Nino off Monterey Bay. Here's a cool pic I dug up while doing research for an article - it claims to be the first bigeye taken in California waters. BigeyeoffCapeMendocino.jpg
 

Nick Clayton

WFF Premium
Nick, some thoughts.
When on troll are you running both motors?
Denise's fly at Tunna speeds I can't envision much movement from that fly or any fly really, what speeds are you running 4-5 knots 6?
My Dad's charter boat would have one down rigger out perform the other one day then reverse the next. But in 25 yrs the port down rigger out performed by 30% or so.
Just more mysteries in fishing, and what makes it so much fun!

I would think trolling like on our 1st day last year is completely different from a day 4 weeks prior or after due to how many fish were around that day. I mean we would go on troll for 10 seconds or less and have all 4 rods hooked up. And this happened on almost every time!

There had to been a school of 10k -100k fish in that area, with how many fish we visually seen.
It was just stupid fishing that day, and I fear I won't see that again.

So easy a cave man could do it!



Man it's funny how often one rod is hot. Earlier this season I had the same group for two days salmon fishing. Fishing was great. I was running a spoon on one rigger and a hoochie on the other. On day one the starboard rigger with the spoon was hot as hell. Everyone was making comments how the spoon was crushing and the hoochie sucked. The next day I purposely swapped gear to the opposite side. That day the starboard rod was hot again with the hoochie and the spoon was quiet. Crazy how that works.

Ya that day last year was not the best indicator of anything haha. Honestly yesterday was very similar, but didn't have the same....crew. The fish were eating everything on the troll. The guys kept switching flies for some reason and it made no difference. I personally caught over double digits just casting from the bow while they were fighting troll fish, and on 4 different patterns. Again it didn't matter.

The day before, we only got some fish trolling and could not get them to eat while stopped, even though we could see them and even watched some reject flies
 

SilverFly

Active Member
PNW the new Baja
Maybe they'll become common to the point it will be worth checking every kelp paddy and log.
Doubt it we'll every see like the day we saw that school of at least 50 mahi chasing a locust swarm of flying fish. And in that purple water!
 

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