Somebody Had a Bad Weekend

Mike.Cline

Bozeman, Montana
I fished this section of the river on Friday morning and this wasn't there. The mishap most likely occurred over the weekend but could have happened Friday afternoon. Probably a novice tourist or local who was completely unfamiliar with this section of river--notorious for large and treacherous log jams. No experienced outfitter would attempt to navigate the right channel here as a collision with the log jam would be inevitable. I don't even attempt it with my kayak. The left side is indeed shallow and may require a little bit of dragging through a riffle, but it sure beats trashing a nice Hyde Drift boat. This one will be there for a while as this is main, central current and even when the water drops a bit, this boat is going to get sucked further into the log pile. I checked with the local fly shop on the way out of town and they were unware of this mishap.

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cdnred

Active Member
Just curious, was this boat badly damaged (hole in the side) or was it merely tightly wedged in place..? I'm assuming who ever owns this boat has written it off as a total loss. Either way, recovery if possible at all would be dangerous. Must have been a novice with very little river experience.
 

Mike.Cline

Bozeman, Montana
Just curious, was this boat badly damaged (hole in the side) or was it merely tightly wedged in place..? I'm assuming who ever owns this boat has written it off as a total loss. Either way, recovery if possible at all would be dangerous. Must have been a novice with very little river experience.
No visible evidence of damage but indeed you are correct. The depth just to the right of boat has got to be 6-10’ as the current pushes under the log pile. There’s no road close by so getting anything that might be able to pull it out is problematic. Time will tell with this one.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
My wife and I saw a family floating the upper Cedar last weekend, in the sort of float tubes that you use in a pool. The Cedar is currently low enough that a lot of rocks are exposed, but high enough that the water is still moving very fast in some sections. I'm certain those float tubes didn't survive long.

I'll stick to wading in shallow water. I have a hard enough time wading in knee deep water, with felt boots and a wading staff, without slipping and nearly cracking my kneecaps.
 

moon1284

Active Member
I fished this section of the river on Friday morning and this wasn't there. The mishap most likely occurred over the weekend but could have happened Friday afternoon. Probably a novice tourist or local who was completely unfamiliar with this section of river--notorious for large and treacherous log jams. No experienced outfitter would attempt to navigate the right channel here as a collision with the log jam would be inevitable. I don't even attempt it with my kayak. The left side is indeed shallow and may require a little bit of dragging through a riffle, but it sure beats trashing a nice Hyde Drift boat. This one will be there for a while as this is main, central current and even when the water drops a bit, this boat is going to get sucked further into the log pile. I checked with the local fly shop on the way out of town and they were unware of this mishap.

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Did they use the anchor rope to tie that oar to the tree?
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
Dang, that sucks.

This is why I get weird about people rowing my boat. I've been in too many sketchy situations and unless I know you are dialed, I have just learned to say no thanks. Shit freaks me out.

This was shared today. Guess they recovered the body of the mom. So sad.

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The drift boat I get. Shit happens fast in skinny water and hard boats. But a raft perfectly wrapped on a bridge column? I doubt I could pull that off if I tried. What bummer...
 

cleanwilly

Coldspotter
Something I've always wondered is could a drift anchor type of thing work to free stuck boats? If you could attach a line to the bow, with whatever length of line would get the drift anchor into current, and let the river do the work? No human risk aside from attaching the line. If the boats a write off anyway, what's the worst that could happen?
 

Flyfishnick

Member
I had a drift boat for a couple of years. Tried it out in a lake, easy enough, I can handle this. Put it in the Yakima in May and had the scariest quick 10 miles I ever seen. Used it a more times later in summers when water was slow and still not 100% comfortable, but at least I was controlling the drift better. At the end of a couple of years, I decided I needed to take a guide class for drift boating (even though I wasn't guiding) for the skills learning for water or stick to my small pontoon or wade. I wade now..............
 

MT_Flyfisher

Active Member
There’s a section of the Yellowstone River a couple miles above the Emigrant Bridge that looks somewhat similar to where that Hyde sank. The river splits into multiple channels there, which change from year to year, and you’re never sure which one is the best to take until you try it. And once you pick a channel, there are always a few tricky places to navigate, and there‘s no going back.

A number of years back, I found a pair of wading boots that had washed up on shore, 4 miles below the Emigrant Bridge. They were tied together, and had the boot size written on the back. I figured they were rentals.

After making a few telephone calls to several local fly shops I was able to locate the guide (from Bozeman) who‘d lost the boots, and got them back to him. The boots were rentals from his fly shop.

He told me he’d been going down the channel on east side of the river, in that place a couple miles up from the Emigrant Bridge, with 2 clients in his boat. The guy in the back was big and weighed well over 200 pounds. He said it was a windy day (isn’t it always?) and the big guy leaned over too far to one side in the boat. Before they could counter by moving to the opposite side, or tell the guy to sit upright, the wind blew them into the bushes that hang out over the shoreline, the wind pushed them into the bushes and the boat sank.

They were very lucky to be able to get out alive after sinking the boat there. They lost some gear, and were able to winch the boat out a few days later.

It doesn’t matter how experienced you are, or how familiar with the river you might be. Accidents can happen in a split second. And moving water can take a pair of wading boots 6 miles down the river. Fortunately, in that case, no one was wearing those boots.
 

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