Moth Balls

Mike.Cline

Bozeman, Montana
Camphor -
I got introduced to Camphor blocks in the early 1980s in the Philippines. Excellent product for insect control. Acquired a lifetime supply of the stuff in the PI and am still using it with all my feather and fur containers. Twelve years in the deep South humidity and never once did I have insect problems with my fly tying materials.
 

Jack Devlin

Active Member
Zip Loc bags in Plastic "Shoeboxes". All new materials coming into the house go in the freezer for a few days and a quick zap in the microwave.
 
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tkww

Member
Has anyone actually experienced problems with bugs in their bug stuff in WA?
Absolutely have, unfortunately.
Any suggestions for bug-free material storage?

Thanks!

Zak
An alternative to moth balls is cedar. You can get it in oil form; cut up a bunch of small wood chips, soak them, and place them as needed.

For what it's worth, I've only had problems in feathers. Never had issues with hair or fur. Not sure why. Probably because the feathers are the most expensive. :rolleyes:
 

kmudgn

Active Member
If you think that you must use a moth repellant, use Camphor. Most (all?) commercial moth ball products are made up of Naphthalene which is not only carcinogenic, but also generally toxic, It can cause a variety of symptoms and is especially bad for your liver & kidneys. Camphor is generally less toxic, except in very large doses and does actually have use in some medicines.
 
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Micktom

Member
Had a wood duck cape a friend of mine gave me and it was in a plastic grocery bag, I left it downstairs in the hvac room thinking I had placed it into the freezer, well the wifey searched out the foul odor and found the bag with the cape and a bunch of maggots working on it. So that’s not what you should do.
 

satnut

Member
I am moving to a new house and will have a space to set up my fly tying desk in my home office. I am going to a bunch of non-airtight plastic bins filled with ziplock bags to store materials on shelves. I am curious what people use to prevent moths/beetles from chowing down on feathers and fur. I've been lucky so far, but I'm sure that I have been courting disaster. I used to have naptha moth balls, but there are different kinds of moth balls now. Also, I'll be working in this office 8-10 hours a day and don't want to breathe too many fumes.

Any suggestions for bug-free material storage?

Thanks!

Zak
cedar moth balls i use. You will find that Dollarama.
 
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Krusty

Outta Here
I place aromatic cedar shavings (purchased at pet stores)in Crown Royal bags in each drawer where I store materials potentially attractive to pests. Everything is in zip locks.

It's extremely important to frequently change out the old Crown Royal bags themselves with new ones...at least monthly. ;)

Many years ago, long before zip locks were even invented, I had severe problems with dermestid beetle larvae, which become the tiny little multicolored beetles common in most household environments. They`ll eat feathers or furs...which is why some zoologists and museums use certain dermestid species to deflesh animals.
 
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