FS Orvis 9'6" Impregnated Bamboo Fly Rod $300 plus shipping.

Dave Westburg

WFF Supporter
Orvis 9’ 6” Impregnated Bamboo fly rod. 3/2. Tips straight and all sections equal length. Weighs 7.6 oz. Serial number 8012. 3/2. Built in 1948 by Robert Albridge. Was missing a fighting butt and end cap when I bought it so I had Mike Monsos make a fighting butt and end cap.

This is a powerful rod suited to winter steelhead or musky or pike or salmon. I like it best with a Scientific Anglers 8 weight Steelhead Taper floating line. Also casts Rio 8 weight density compensated sink tip. I was advised on the Classic Fly Rod forum that this rod was a 9 weight but I like it with an 8.

$300 plus shipping. Cash or Paypal preferred. Happy to let you try casting it to see if you like it.

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cdnred

Active Member
I'm totally new with bamboo and because of COVID, I find myself with too much idle time so I'm trying to understand the wording. By the term "Impregnated Bamboo" does that it refers to a special process used when getting built..? Does "impregnating" have to do with the age of the rod (1948) with this method being done at time of manufacture so that it wouldn't dry out with time..? Has "impregnating" been replaced by newer, more effective methods of preservation for drying out in later years..? As far as prices go, I think $300 is awfully cheap in comparison to what bamboo rods are selling for these days so I'm thinking the term "impregnated plus the age 1948" has something to do with that..? From the pics it appears to be quite a beautiful rod and for a steal of only $300, I'm sure it'll give someone a lot of pleasure..
 

flybill

A collector never stops collecting!
WFF Supporter
I'm totally new with bamboo and because of COVID, I find myself with too much idle time so I'm trying to understand the wording. By the term "Impregnated Bamboo" does that it refers to a special process used when getting built..? Does "impregnating" have to do with the age of the rod (1948) with this method being done at time of manufacture so that it wouldn't dry out with time..? Has "impregnating" been replaced by newer, more effective methods of preservation for drying out in later years..? As far as prices go, I think $300 is awfully cheap in comparison to what bamboo rods are selling for these days so I'm thinking the term "impregnated plus the age 1948" has something to do with that..? From the pics it appears to be quite a beautiful rod and for a steal of only $300, I'm sure it'll give someone a lot of pleasure..
Bamboo rods vary in prices so much, depending on condition, length, taper and rarity. I like a 7' to 7'6" 2 piece 4wt or 5wt. This would be a good 1st rod if you want a longer one and Orvis rods new now are $2k to $3k.. I've been fortunate to try so many boo rods over the years at calves and our local Bamboo fling.

Impregnated is the way they finish the blank. Just so you know, bamboo is more durable than modern graphite rods so if you get it then fish it hard! This would probably be a great nymph rod and maybe a streamer rod depending on the action.

Cheers!
 

cdnred

Active Member
Bamboo rods vary in prices so much, depending on condition, length, taper and rarity.
I understand that there's more of a science in judging a true value of a bamboo rod. Based on Orvis rods selling today for $2k to $3k, $300 would be quite cheap. Has technology changed that much since 1948 to justify that much difference in price..? How long do bamboo rods last in comparison to graphite or glass..? Does age tend to make bamboo more brittle with time..? Just trying to get some idea of justifying prices and values..
 

flybill

A collector never stops collecting!
WFF Supporter
I understand that there's more of a science in judging a true value of a bamboo rod. Based on Orvis rods selling today for $2k to $3k, $300 would be quite cheap. Has technology changed that much since 1948 to justify that much difference in price..? How long do bamboo rods last in comparison to graphite or glass..? Does age tend to make bamboo more brittle with time..? Just trying to get some idea of justifying prices and values..
No a bamboo rod that is well cared for can last forever. Kind of like the collector car market. Condition is key along with rarity! Graphite and glass can last a long time.. we can move this offline or to the Bamboo and glass sub forum so we don't affect the sellers ad here...
 

Dave Westburg

WFF Supporter
By the term "Impregnated Bamboo" does that it refers to a special process used when getting built..? Does "impregnating" have to do with the age of the rod (1948) with this method being done at time of manufacture so that it wouldn't dry out with time..?
Great questions cdnred. Two ways to waterproof a bamboo rod: varnish or impregnation. Most Orvis and Sharpes bamboo rods were impregnated as well as some Leonards, Phillipsons and Wright and McGill's. Impregnation is dipping a completed bamboo rod in hot resin when it's finished. The resin seeps into the pores of the bamboo and waterproofs the rod. Some people say it also makes the bamboo stronger and less prone to take a set. Impregnation last the lifetime of the rod unlike varnish which can crack and chip. The drawbacks of impregnation are that the rod is slightly heavier and not as pretty as a gleaming varnished bamboo rod.

Has "impregnating been replaced by newer, more effective methods of preservation for drying out in later years...?
I think most modern rodmakers varnish because it's prettier and because impregnation is more complicated than simply dipping the rod in a varnish tank or rubbing tung oil on the rod when it's complete.

As far as prices go, I think $300 is awfully cheap
Long bamboo rods are cheaper than short bamboo rods because there's less demand for them. Used Orvis impregnated bamboo rods of 7-8 feet routinely sell for $500-800 used. At 9' and above most people fish graphite because it's lighter. This is a great rod but I don't need it because I recently bought a two handed Sharpes bamboo rod for my winter steelheading.
 
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cdnred

Active Member
Great questions cdnred. Two ways to waterproof a bamboo rod: varnish or impregnation. Most Orvis and Sharpes bamboo rods were impregnated as well as some Leonards, Phillipsons and Wright and McGill's. Impregnation is dipping a completed bamboo rod in hot resin when it's finished. The resin seeps into the pores of the bamboo and waterproofs the rod. Some people say it also makes the bamboo stronger and less prone to take a set. Impregnation last the lifetime of the rod unlike varnish which can crack and chip. The drawbacks of impregnation are that the rod is slightly heavier and not as pretty as a gleaming varnished bamboo rod.


I think most modern rodmakers varnish because it's prettier and because impregnation is more complicated than simply dipping the rod in a varnish tank or rubbing tung oil on the rod when it's complete.


Long bamboo rods cheaper than short bamboo rods because there's less demand for them. Used Orvis impregnated bamboo rods of 7-8 feet routinely sell for $500-800 used. At 9' and above most people fish graphite because it's lighter. This is a great rod but I don't need it because I recently bought a two handed Sharpes bamboo rod for my winter steelheading.
Thanks for getting back to me, lots of crazy questions I'm sure. I'm totally new to bamboo so I'm not all that familar with it. Beautiful rod, I think that the darker color actually gives the rod more character which would be favored and being from 1948, it has a lot of mojo to go with it. I wish you all the luck with your sale, beautiful rod..
 

Dave Westburg

WFF Supporter
I think that the darker color actually gives the rod more character
I'm partial to darker bamboo. Some makers flame the blanks to make them darker. Impregnation darkens bamboo. Granger used to fume bamboo blanks with ammonia after oven baking them to temper the cane. That's why Granger rods have a lovely dark caramel color. Look at this varnished Granger Champion.
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