Saltwater fish processing

thatguyryry

Active Member
I might be getting ahead of myself here, but what's people's go-to tuna canning recipe. And while we're at it, what about canning salmon?

I also don't think it's a bad idea to talk about other techniques: smoking, etc.

I just live me some good ole sea to table food!
 
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thatguyryry

Active Member
I'll go first. I like me a classic fresh caught salmon. Salt your salmon about an hour to half an hour before cooking. Bring about 3-4 tablespoons of butter and a tablespoon of high heat oil (like grapeseed) on the pan on high. Crush some garlic and a couple twigs of fresh herbs (tetragon, oregano, sage and rosemary are good ) and put in butter oil mixture. Salmon and pepper salmon again and Cook salmon skin side up for about 5 minutes until nice brown crisp is formed. Flip skin side down, turn down heat to medium and spoon butter mixture over the top for another 8 minutes or so. Salmon should be slightly pink still but flakey. Let rest a couple minutes and it should be done to perfection.

Note: timing is dependent on the size of fillets. I've been working with some pretty big kings lately and these times are just enough to get salmon medium rare.

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TDB

Flounder Pounder
I suggest getting some in-laws that like to can. By far my favorite method.

For smoked tuna I like this one:
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
For salmon, if I do not grill or cook similar to you @thatguyryry, I have been making this. I enjoy it and my wife is a big fan.

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Ingredients
Salmon of your choice
Pasta
Olive oil
Butter
White whine
Cherry tomatoes
Fresh basil
Garlic
Paprika
Red pepper flakes
Grated parmigiana cheese
Salt
Pepper

Cook the salmon in skillet with olive oil (season with salt and pepper) until 2/3rds done then remove. Turn heat to med/low, and add more olive olive, butter, pepper flakes and garlick (fresh). Cook for a minute or so and add cherry tomatoes and half the basil. Cook for another minute or so. Add white wine and turn heat to low to cook down to a consistency that will coat pasta well. Add pasta.Add paprika (taste and salt/pepper to taste). Add grated parmigiana and remaining basil and salmon and toss. Cool on low heat for a minute or two. Top with grated parmigiana and red pepper flakes.

If I recall, the original recipe this was based off called for sun dried tomatoes instead of cherry tomatoes and spinach instead of basil. It also did not call for white wine, grated parmigiana or butter. I tinkered a bit and have been happy with the outcome.
 

Kfish

WFF Supporter
Canning is foreign to me, wouldn't know where to begin. My sisters family can can some really good spicy shad after pressure cooking to rid of the bones.

For salmon that follows me home I usually prep it with salt and pepper, garlic powder, olive oil, little teriyaki sauce or soy sauce, maybe a little mayo too.
Air fry them batch by batch.

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thatguyryry

Active Member
For tuna I put absolutely nothing in the jars except for a clove or two or garlic. No water, no oil, its just not needed.

Mostly I like to add other flavors after I open the jar rather than make the jars in various flavors
Do you just follow the standard canning instructions?
 

fishy

Active Member
I might be getting ahead of myself here, but what's people's go-to tuna canning recipe. And while we're at it, what about canning salmon?

I also don't think it's a bad idea to talk about other techniques: smoking, etc.

I just live me some good ole sea to table food!
I personally find it a shame to take an incredible sushi and grill grade fish and can it...JMHO. If you do choose to want the highest quality loins, do not let the crew loin and bag the fish, I find that frequently allows for blood and bile to come into contact with the loins....that is not optimal and results in needing to trim down the loins after. I prefer to have the crew head, gut and ice my fish. They don't like to do this but will if you hold em to it. I then buy shaved ice in WP, pack the fish in it, and process at home, where the loins can be removed cleanly, patted dry, and immediately vacuum packed and frozen. Rinsing is verboten as the water easily penetrates the soft flesh. Loins processed this way, if defrosted in the packs in cold water, will provide sushi grade fish for many months. The carcasses also make great crab bait!!
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
Has anyone tried making tuna jerky? That would make a great snack while fishing....for tuna.

I might sacrifice a frozen loin and give it a go.
 

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