Beach Cannon?

Timson

Active Member
I have a 8100 rpl+ / rio grande set up dumps damn near the backing but my arthritis is only good for a ,very, few casts. Question is the pain worth the stress on your joints? Just typing...
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
If you can't cast far enough, wade deeper.

If you can't wade deep enough, buy a boat.

If you can't catch salmon off the boat, buy downriggers.

If you still can't catch salmon then go to Fred Meyer, think it's around $13/lb on sale.
You forgot a step: Dunning-Krueger. Pick one group to blame above all others: WDFW/Indigenous/Commercial/land development/global climate change/etc.
 

Richard E

Active Member
My post was only semi-serious but I appreciate everyone's responses. I'm rocking a 6wt Sage One with a RIO OBS or a 8WT Sage Method with the same line. Always with a stripping basket if on the beach etc... Pretty sure those should both be cannons, so I'm assuming it's the "Indian, not the Arrow" in this case. I think cutting down my running line seems like my best bet! Or, some turf field practice. Etiher way, I don't think I'm materially missing out on many fish with the distance I get, but still my ego!!!

The other thing I notice is that I can really huck an unweighted fly. My flat-wings get out there the furthest. The heavy dumbell eye clousers prob go 10-15% shorter. I can't seem to get them going fast enough back to get the timing right on the forward haul, when I'm at max distance.

I'm not looking for advice (though happy to read it) as i'm sure practice, practice, practice is the answer if I really wanted to get there.
In my opinion, if a person really wants to eek out all the distance they can out of a line, the standard OB and not the OB Short is the better choice. Long(er) casts require the caster to carry more line during false casting, and the longer OB head allows more line carry than the OBS before hinging. The convenience of the OB Short is it's a great line to have when fishing from a beach that has a relatively steep incline (so the fly doesn't bonk the beach on the backcast), when the backcast area is short/limited, or when the caster wants to get the cast done more quickly (fewer backcasts) than with a longer head line. As noted earlier, with a longer head, the standard OB, with its longer head, allows the caster to aerialize more line, which could and should result in longer casts. I believe Rio recognizes this to the extent the OB short is 100' long and the standard OB (at least the 'old' ones that I use) are 120' long.

Your experience with unweighted vs weighted fly is pretty common. Any fly, weighted or unweighted, can 'dump' at the end of a cast; sometimes its because a caster drops their rod tip on the delivery cast, but typically the reason is because there isn't enough energy in the cast, at the end, to transfer to the fly for turnover. With weighted flies this can be two reasons; one, the aforementioned, and two, the leader isn't strong enough/stiff enough to turn over the weighted fly and collapses. For example, if you try to cast a 2/0 clouser on a 9' 3x leader, that 3x won't be stiff enough to turn over the clouser and will collapse. Use even a straight 5' piece of, say, 15 pound mono, and the opportunity for turnover increases (assuming a good cast it made).

Summarizing, in general, longer casts require aerializing more line, which requires longer heads and flies dumping at the end of a cast is caused by lack of energy transfer at the end of the cast.

Hope this helps.
 
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Richard E

Active Member
My dad was one of "those" people it didn't matter what he was casting, 90+ feet was nothing for him. His easiest casting rod was a 10' for 7wt IMX that was 25+ years old...that rod caught 1000's of steelhead and 100's of baby tarpon and bonefish with long casts.
Too funny. The description of your dad and his experience with that IMX is similar to that of a good friend, a great fly tyer and caster. When he and I first met and fished together, that 10' 7 weight IMX was his go-to rod. He picked that model because when he test cast rods, he easily got 10-15' more out of that rod. He used it for years until it broke, and he was heartbroken Loomis couldn't build him another. He bought the same length and line weight in the GLX, and though he likes the rod a lot, it didn't seem to have the same magic for him that the IMX had.
 

Richard E

Active Member
This made think of a time I was in Moses Lake casting poppers around docks from a boat when a kitten came down to watch. I made some false casts over by the kitty and it jumped up and caught the popper in its front paw.
True definition of 'cat' fishing!
 

Porter

Well-Known Member
What line(s) are you pairing with that stick?

Been using these two set ups the most.

Rio Coastal Quickshooter WF8I

Airflo Rage 330gr with Rio 0.32" 20LB. Shooting Line

That rod is more like an eight weight, and to find out it cast the 8's great.
 

Richard E

Active Member
Been using these two set ups the most.

Rio Coastal Quickshooter WF8I

Airflo Rage 330gr with Rio 0.32" 20LB. Shooting Line

That rod is more like an eight weight, and to find out it cast the 8's great.

Agree the rod is more like an 8 weight; I've often referred to my 691 TCR as a 7+. Mine tosses 250+ grain lines like they were designed for it. I love fishing for rockfish with mine.

You like that Quickshooter?
 

wanderingrichard

Active Member
What lb test and leader will turn over a puppy? I struggle to cast them more than 20’ (it’s more of a chuck-and-duck situation) and the presentation is terrible.

You’re right, though, it does draw a crowd.
Now that you mention it, Chuckers tag line comes to mind. I wonder how much that parrot weighs......???
 

longputt

Active Member
Too funny. The description of your dad and his experience with that IMX is similar to that of a good friend, a great fly tyer and caster. When he and I first met and fished together, that 10' 7 weight IMX was his go-to rod. He picked that model because when he test cast rods, he easily got 10-15' more out of that rod. He used it for years until it broke, and he was heartbroken Loomis couldn't build him another. He bought the same length and line weight in the GLX, and though he likes the rod a lot, it didn't seem to have the same magic for him that the IMX had.
You make an interesting point...he was the only IMX owner I know that didn't break his rod we still have it. I tried the GLX along side of his IMX and it just wasn't the same. I think the IMX was one of those rods that pushed the limit of the materials and fabrication at that time. My brother broke his first IMX blank wrapping the guides on the tip!
 

moon1284

Active Member
Too funny. The description of your dad and his experience with that IMX is similar to that of a good friend, a great fly tyer and caster. When he and I first met and fished together, that 10' 7 weight IMX was his go-to rod. He picked that model because when he test cast rods, he easily got 10-15' more out of that rod. He used it for years until it broke, and he was heartbroken Loomis couldn't build him another. He bought the same length and line weight in the GLX, and though he likes the rod a lot, it didn't seem to have the same magic for him that the IMX had.

I have a 9' 7 imx and 9' 7 glx. Both great rods but I prefer the glx. I have a 10' 7 scott arc and had a 10' 7 sp. After the arc I didn't want another 10' 7. I never cast an 10' 7 imx or glx but I'd imagine they'd be rocket launchers.

To answer the op, I use the arc 1007 with sinking line. For floating line, A tcr 9 6, or glx 9 7, or xp 9 8 depending on the size of the fly. I'd like to get a tcr 9 8. I would imagine that rod is insane. With the tcr 9 6, 2 false casts and let her rip and I'm in the backing with a dt6f.
 
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Porter

Well-Known Member
Well I like it for launching. Not my favorite for feel. I think for the most part, at least my experience, when talking about lines that launch some extra feet that they lose some feel/feedback to the rod holder. Running lines are horrible, but also help getting you out there a bit further.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
I really like casting overhead from the beach with a two handed rod. My current one is a CND Oceana beach rod, 9 weight. It's lined with a Wulff saltwater intermediate line, airflo salmon taper leader. So easy to cast. No need to muscle it. Fishing from the beach? Get a rod designed for it...
 

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