Do you wax your rod….

mtskibum16

Active Member
Your opinion is incorrect.
That's like, your opinion man. Please enlighten us as to why a rod manufacturer would intentionally design ferrules that won't stay together (when in fact most of them do stay together) while doing the thing the rod is designed to do (cast a line).

"Oh look, there's the shot I've been waiting for all day. Good thing I have the newest ultra super fast rod so I can make this cast....wait wait, hold on let me check and make sure my rod is still together. Good, good, oh damn loose. Ok all set, now where did that fish go?"

I'm not saying the occasional check is a bad thing, but I don't think you should have to check "many times a day." Since I have a bunch of rods that all stay together for a day of fishing, I know for a fact that the insurmountable physics you speak of is in fact possible to solve.
 
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CreekScrambler

Active Member
I just check them every so often throughout a day of fishing. Mostly when I’m changing flies or moving between spots. That way I don’t have the oh-shits from hooking a fish in a half-built rod.

I also try to minimize the number of times that I assemble and disassemble my rods. Fewer opportunities to introduce wear from grit.

In rotating machinery, there are matching tapered shaft ends and coupling hub bores that are mounted using tremendous hydraulic pressure to force the coupling a specified distance beyond initial contact. Maybe a max/min set of ring markings on the male ferrule could let us all know when there’s insufficient press or excessive wear.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
That's like, your opinion man. Please enlighten us as to why a rod manufacturer would intentionally design ferrules that won't stay together (when in fact most of them do stay together) while doing the thing the rod is designed to do (cast a line).

"Oh look, there's the shot I've been waiting for all day. Good thing I have the newest ultra super fast rod so I can make this cast....wait wait, hold on let me check and make sure my rod is still together. Good, good, oh damn loose. Ok all set, now where did that fish go?"

I'm not saying the occasional check is a bad thing, but I don't think you should have to check "many times a day." Since I have a bunch of rods that all stay together for a day of fishing, I know for a fact that the insurmountable physics you speak of is in fact possible to solve.

1. In a perfectly designed ferrule the only thing holding the rod together is friction
2. Friction can be lost in a number of ways without the anglers knowledge.
3. Perfectly designed ferrules can wear out.
4. If you don't check your ferrules and miss an opportunity that's your fault not the rods.
5. Then start your own rod company and solve the problem, until then don't complain.
 

long_rod_silvers

WFF Supporter
1. In a perfectly designed ferrule the only thing holding the rod together is friction
2. Friction can be lost in a number of ways without the anglers knowledge.
3. Perfectly designed ferrules can wear out.
4. If you don't check your ferrules and miss an opportunity that's your fault not the rods.
5. Then start your own rod company and solve the problem, until then don't complain.
Adding to number 4 based on personal experience: Or if you give your rod to a friend to use, let him know he needs to check the ferrules, or it might get returned in a different condition then you gave it to him....
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
1. In a perfectly designed ferrule the only thing holding the rod together is friction
2. Friction can be lost in a number of ways without the anglers knowledge.
3. Perfectly designed ferrules can wear out.
4. If you don't check your ferrules and miss an opportunity that's your fault not the rods.
5. Then start your own rod company and solve the problem, until then don't complain.
Compressive force is also a factor in keeping sections together. The receiving end of a section expands when the tapered end of the lower section is inserted, then contracts again and helps hold the sections together.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Compressive force is also a factor in keeping sections together. The receiving end of a section expands when the tapered end of the lower section is inserted, then contracts again and helps hold the sections together.
Carbon fiber does not compress That is why it breaks.
 

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