Foam body October caddis?

Derek Young

Down By The Riverside
The YakCaddis was developed on the Yakima and works all across the Western US during this hatch, and as a attractor pattern too. Purchase them from Orvis, and they donate proceeds of sales to Native Fish Society to fund conservation work.

DO NOT BUY FROM BIG Y FLY SUPPLY, THEY ARE UNAUTHORIZED FAKES.


Derek
 

Creatch'r

Hesitant Member
I like a messy splayed out elk hair wing on my OC dries. I think it does a better job of creating both the profile and surface disturbance of a natural struggling and flopping around. I also much prefer the foam lip on the front rather then tied bullet style to help skate the fly as I never fish them dead drift. I’m always twitching, skittering, stripping or skating them with the rod help high and wiggling and I need all the help I can get to keep them riding high. It’s a lot more work then fishing dead drift but I find it much more productive especially on larger fish. My favorite hatch of the year no doubt and usually calls up the biggest fish of the season. This year has been a great showing IMO.
 
Some of those flies by Scott and James are gorgeous, but look complicated to tie. I often fish OC flies in pockets in fast bouldery water, where breaking off a fish is always a possibility and where they get chewed up fast, so I tie simpler patterns. I tie a foam version, but I've found myself moving away from synthetic materials as much as possible in recent years and now mostly tie one with natural dubbing, dyed grizzly hackle palmered tightly, and an elk hair downwing; it's durable and high floating. My one concession to synthetics is a bit of white poly yarn on top for visibility.
Dick
 

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Jesseg122

Active Member
I like a messy splayed out elk hair wing on my OC dries. I think it does a better job of creating both the profile and surface disturbance of a natural struggling and flopping around. I also much prefer the foam lip on the front rather then tied bullet style to help skate the fly as I never fish them dead drift. I’m always twitching, skittering, stripping or skating them with the rod help high and wiggling and I need all the help I can get to keep them riding high. It’s a lot more work then fishing dead drift but I find it much more productive especially on larger fish. My favorite hatch of the year no doubt and usually calls up the biggest fish of the season. This year has been a great showing IMO.
Can you show an example of the foam lip on your caddis? I'm very intrigued lol
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Premium
I tie a foam version, but I've found myself moving away from synthetic materials as much as possible in recent years

Is this because you think the naturals perform better or because foam is impure?

I resisted using foam, on the basis of purity, for a long time. One day, I had a revelation; my rod is made of graphite, my fly line is made of PVC, my leader is made of nylon and my hooks are chemically sharpened. I've been on a progressive decline into outright filth ever since.

I find that dubbing really sucks on larger flies, because it acts like a sponge and holds a tonne of water weight. Foam has some pretty significant advantages there.
 
Is this because you think the naturals perform better or because foam is impure?

Jared,
I simply prefer tying with feathers and fur; I don't enjoy tying with foam as much. I used to do it quite a lot, but I didn't feel like I got significantly better performance from tying with it. Also, not all dubbing is equally hydrophilic. Rabbit fur is the worst and I never use it on dry flies. My favorite for dry flies is beaver, which is naturally hydrophobic. For this October Caddis, I use a squirrel blend that is a mix of natural and synthetic. I use all synthetic dubbing on some big dry flies, so I'm no purist.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Premium
Jared,
I simply prefer tying with feathers and fur; I don't enjoy tying with foam as much. I used to do it quite a lot, but I didn't feel like I got significantly better performance from tying with it. Also, not all dubbing is equally hydrophilic. Rabbit fur is the worst and I never use it on dry flies. My favorite for dry flies is beaver, which is naturally hydrophobic. For this October Caddis, I use a squirrel blend that is a mix of natural and synthetic. I use all synthetic dubbing on some big dry flies, so I'm no purist.

I tried all the supposedly hydrophobic dubbings and they never really lived up to expectations. I never tried beaver though. That may warrant some experimentation.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
I don't know what to say about the listed variations. I simply tie and EHK with orange dubbing, mix in some orange dyed deer hair with the elk, add Gink and fish. It is an easy tie, floats well, and catches fish.
 

Creatch'r

Hesitant Member
I tie a fly like this onto my 3wt in May and take it off sometime in November. Last week I caught a 24-25” rainbow on it on a windy day when the last of the hoppers were out. It does great imitating anything from an ant to a small stonefly to an October.
Yeah I tie it in a couple different body colors for the same reason. Nice and simple fly that just works. I just happen to like it best for an OC. Tie it in a few shades of orange and twitch it around.
 
Some of those flies by Scott and James are gorgeous, but look complicated to tie. I often fish OC flies in pockets in fast bouldery water, where breaking off a fish is always a possibility and where they get chewed up fast, so I tie simpler patterns. I tie a foam version, but I've found myself moving away from synthetic materials as much as possible in recent years and now mostly tie one with natural dubbing, dyed grizzly hackle palmered tightly, and an elk hair downwing; it's durable and high floating. My one concession to synthetics is a bit of white poly yarn on top for visibility.
Dick

I hear ya Richard. They do take a long time to tie, but they are durable and I rarely lose one. I tied 4 of those last year, and I still have all of them, I've only fished 2 of them.

Regarding foam, I use it for floatability. I noticed the Elk Hair Caddis style flies are great, but if you have a dropper off of them they sink fast. Additionally, when you catch a fish the elk hair flies just never really float as good again. It's awesome to fish a naked dry fly, but where I fish this hatch, there are also tons of fall mayflies around, and I like to fish a sz. 14 or 16 tungsten nymph off the back of mine. Using the foam allows me to catch tons of fish on both flies, and I don't have to dry them off and re-apply floating every time.

Had a really good day a few days back, catching lots of these on both the dry and the nymph. Only used floatant one time.
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Shack

Active Member
I really like Clark stones for where I fish (middle and lower deschutes/metolius), on flat water they have a good silhouette and if you gink em up they float well on rough water too. I mix rust and orange color Clark’s yarn, use orange tinsel, and then stimulator hair and either black, Cree, or furnace hackle for the head depending on which hackle I find first in my big box of random dry fly hackle
 

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