manners

MacRowdy

Idaho Resident Craftsman/Artisan
#16
Yeah No kidding! 10 yards was plenty. On our way off the river I came up and slipped in about 7 yards upstream of Whitey 70 ft below some other guy who was there before me and Whitey had a conniption fit! Told me to stop crowding the guy above me and I told him "scoot down so I don't have to crowd." Hahaha So technically I was coming upstream so all of those fellas should have made way!!!!!!!!!! hahahaha I think that is a lame rule. Whitey kept on voicing his contempt so I left the river. Then when I ripped down the dirt road at a lightning fast 10 mph. "Slow down! Slow Down!" Came the plea. "This is a rally car not your grandma’s short bus!"

So when I got home Whitey called me to tell me to read this thread on Fishing Manners. So I am taking serious consideration of everything written here. I must repent, mend my ways; become a new fisherman. Sorry fellas I have no manners. I will try to do better. Whitey is very considerate of anyone he doesn't know.


MacRowdy :THUMBSUP
 
#17
A slightly different take

I've got a few comments based on the list at the top of this thread

2. A slow moving or stationary angler has the right to remain where he/she is. If you are moving, leave the water and quietly walk around the angler in position in the water. You get 20 feet upstream and downstream, maybe 30 feet max

4. A person working upstream has the right of way over someone fishing downstream. I don't understand this at all. It seems counter to the "cast-and-step-down" approach that enables everyone to share a particular piece of water. I've never come across this situation, but when/ if I do I don't be giving anyone automatic access just because they're wading up.

6. Do not enter the water directly in front of someone already in the water. In fact, don't enter the water AT ALL in front of someone as long as it's the same run -- that includes the tailout 50 yards downstream, too. Walk up to the angler, say (don't ask) that you are intending on fishing the water and that you propose to step in above and cast-and-step. Is that OK with him or does he prefer that you start somewhere else? (Within reason) Oh, and if one of us hooks up how do you want to handle that? Stay where you are or move to the top and cast-and-step?

10. Wade only when necessary. The aquatic food chain is fragile. I'm not certain how fragile the food chain is -- rocks tumble in streams all the time -- but don't wade through redds!
"Poor loops, but at least the fly is landing farther out than the main line these days"
 
#18
A slightly different take

rule #4 applies to trout fishing streams where it is always better to sneak up on fish from behind. it does not apply to steelhead fishing where you usually work downstream through a run.
 
#19
A slightly different take

Then rule #4 should be on the list of rules for how to actually catch trout effectively, but that doesn't mean an angler working downstream for trout has poor etiquette. It just means he's a poor fisherman. Even in trout streams, an angler fishing streamers will usually work downstream. Does that mean streamer anglers should always yield to dry fly anglers? I don't think so. Rule #4 has gotta go.

db

"If I don't catch them today, I'll catch them another day." Art Flick
 
#20
A slightly different take

you sound a little angry. these are just some guidelines that somebody wrote down. it's usually pretty obvious what the right thing to do is. my biggest pet peave is when i walk an hour to fish a hole and a drift boat goes right through even though they could go around. or even worse fishes the same spot.
 
#21
A slightly different take

I'm not even a little angry. That's the problem with communicating this way -- when you can't hear someone's tone of voice, it's easy to take something the wrong way. I'd put one of those smiley faces or thumbs up guys after any sentence that may be taken wrong, but for some reason it always appears at the very end, even if I want it like somewhere in the middle. Like this . . .

db

"If I don't catch them today, I'll catch them another day." Art Flick :BIGSMILE :THUMBSUP
 
#22
A slightly different take

"but that doesn't mean an angler working downstream for trout has poor etiquette. It just means he's a poor fisherman."

I won't take this quote personally. I know that everyone has their own method of fishing rivers and streams and if I am fishing downstream and catching fish with this method, I wouldn't consider myself a poor fisherman. The fact of the matter is, when the river is moving really fast during runoff season, it is really the only way for me to make long drifts. It is also easier to move downstream than upstream. This is a much more common method than you may think. All of the best fishermen on the west coast use this technique because it is much easier than fighting the speed and strength of the current fishing upstream. IMHO, it is also much better to deliver a fly from above a fish than cast over it and risk spooking it.

I am sorry to say, your quote is incorrect. No offense.
 
#23
A slightly different take

. . . if I am fishing downstream and catching fish with this method, I wouldn't consider myself a poor fisherman.
You're right, of course. If you're catching plenty of good fish, then there's nothing wrong with your technique. My point, in case I mistated it, was simply that whether you work upstream or downstream is not a question of etiquette, but rather one of technique, and that neither angler has a "right of way" over the other.

db

"If I don't catch them today, I'll catch them another day." Art Flick
 

ChrisW

AKA Beadhead
#24
A slightly different take

Ethics, ettiquette, manners these are all different things actually.

Ethics = not fishing for salmon on their redds even if legal to do so.
Ettiquette= Fishing down and behind other (earlier) anglers on steelhead flywater.
Manners= politely asking a staionary angler if you can fish below.

Here's a hypothetical ettiquette question: Suppose I arrive on the N Fork at a popular access point where there is a long run both upstream and down. I see a couple anglers 100 yards upstream, presumably working down. Should I:
A)Walk up the gravel bar and get in line behind?
B)Start right there and move down?
C)Walk a bit further down to increase the distance?
D)Immediately start chumming the water and plunking immediately below the other two?
E)What difference does it make I'll never catch a steelhead anyway?

Bh
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#25
A slightly different take

What do I know---I'm just an old man

This string could go on and on with all the questions being questioned. Like when you come to a river to fish do you go up stream or down stream. I usually go both ways. It depends on the conditions and how the waters look But I think most people go down stream.

Jim
 

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