3-day sockeye season for Lake Washington to open Saturday

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#16
Troutfanatic,

I didn't click on the metro link, but here's a brief explanation of the source of the Lake Washington sockeye salmon run. John Kemmeric of the US Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries planted Baker River sockeye eggs in Issaquah Creek and the Cedar River between 1936 and 1940. He was kind of the Johnny Appleseed of salmon in those years. He stocked Baker sockeye just about everywhere a lake had an outlet to Puget Sound or the ocean. I'd go pull his report, but it's in a box under 3 boxes of other stuff.

Sincerely,

Salmo g.
 
E

ErieSteelhead

Guest
#17
Salmo_g said:
Troutfanatic,

I didn't click on the metro link, but here's a brief explanation of the source of the Lake Washington sockeye salmon run. John Kemmeric of the US Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries planted Baker River sockeye eggs in Issaquah Creek and the Cedar River between 1936 and 1940. He was kind of the Johnny Appleseed of salmon in those years. He stocked Baker sockeye just about everywhere a lake had an outlet to Puget Sound or the ocean. I'd go pull his report, but it's in a box under 3 boxes of other stuff.

Sincerely,

Salmo g.
The article had a different set of dates. Could this be a different cedar plant?
Sockeye salmon are another species whose numbers increased during the lake's period of eutrophication, although the increase was probably not directly related to the level of phosphorus in the lake. Sockeye salmon are unique among salmon in that the smolts have a yearlong phase in freshwater lakes before to their migration to the sea. Sockeye had been planted in the Cedar River in 1953 but were in relatively low numbers until the mid 1960s. In 1970 the fish were numerous enough for the state to permit commercial fishing in the lake. The increase in sockeye may be due to inadvertent benefits reaped to the spawning beds, when flood control measures and a halt to channel dredging (because of equipment failure) just happened to reduce the silt accumulation on the gravel spawning beds. The smolts from Lake Washington are the largest of their species, but numbers have been down in recent years. Research into the cause of the decline is under way by several agencies. It includes research on food supply, predation, and physical damage from the Government Locks during out-migration.
 
#18
As Salmo_g said, all of the Cedar River fish are a result of outplants from another basin, Baker Lake. There were numourous plants from a lot of different sources at one time or the other but is seem like the Baker Lake plants were the only succussful ones to become established and genetic tests have largely confirmed this. Remember that the Cedar did not originally flow into Lake Washington, it discharged via the Black River to the Duwamish and so would not have likely had a native run of Sockeye.

At this time it is generally accepted that there are three genetically distinct "runs" in the lake at present: Cedar River, Bear Creek and beach spawners but they are all 'managed' by WDFW as one "stock." There is some evidence that there were some kokanee in the system before the Cedar and Black Rivers were were replumbed following construction of the locks. However, it is unclear if the Bear Creek and beach spawners are remnants of the indigenous population or if they have developed as distinct stocks as a result of straying from the Cedar over time. Some of the more recent studies appear support that they all originated from the Baker Lake stock.

For those who are not already completely bored by this discussion, there is an even more boring summary of this in the Final Supplimental EIS for the Cedar River Sockeye hatchery. A summary of the three different sockeye stocks in the Lake Washington system is included in the section on potenial impacts from straying as a result of the hatchery. Section 3.2.2 beginning on page 3-4.

http://www.seattle.gov/util/stellent/groups/public/@spu/@ssw/documents/webcontent/cos_004299.pdf
 

CovingtonFly

B.O.H.I.C.A. bend over here it comes again
#19
For what ever it is worth I am not going to get real thankful because a handful of commercial fishermen, native or citizen, gave us some fish.[/QUOTE]


I'm thankful that a handful of commercial fishermen gave us some fish. I think that's pretty cool that there's gonna be a three day opener for sockeye and I know there are a huge number of people that are excited about the opener. I hope the tribe does get some good PR from all this. Now, if you'll excuse me I've got to try and find someone with a boat..hint, hint
 

Cliff

Active Member
#20
I applaud the Suquamish for doing this, and I am thankful, too. I bought some sockeye from the fishermen at the Shilshole dock on Thursday. Tasty!
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#21
CovingtonFly said:
For what ever it is worth I am not going to get real thankful because a handful of commercial fishermen, native or citizen, gave us some fish.

I'm thankful that a handful of commercial fishermen gave us some fish. I think that's pretty cool that there's gonna be a three day opener for sockeye and I know there are a huge number of people that are excited about the opener. I hope the tribe does get some good PR from all this. Now, if you'll excuse me I've got to try and find someone with a boat..hint, hint[/QUOTE]

Write them a letter telling them how much you appreciate the bone. Perhaps in the future the commercials will throw you a few more. Maybe you can roll over and play dead for them.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#25
Not sure why you think I am being hostile. I simply stated that I am not going to get real thankful because some commercial fishermen felt sorry for us poor sport fishermen and gave away a few fish. Considering the hundreds of thousands of fish caught by the commercial fishing industry each year a few thousand reds given up by them isn't going to get me all gushy.

Have you hugged a gill netter today?

I don't gamble.
 

hawkeye

trout in a brook, you're about to get hooked...
#26
Benn said:
At this time it is generally accepted that there are three genetically distinct "runs" in the lake at present: Cedar River, Bear Creek and beach spawners but they are all 'managed' by WDFW as one "stock."
Wow, what a fantastic strategy with sound biological basis. These are the things that make me go: hmmmm??

Nearly the first equation you learn in population ecology:

Population size (N) (at time t+1) = N (at time t) + birth - death.

The first two components are unlikely to be similar for the three runs, though they treat the management of their death the same. That's the problem with alot of wildlife management, they are always managing for the present or past [N(t), N(t-x)], not the future [N(t+1)].

But heck, why would we want to do that? Genius.
 

CovingtonFly

B.O.H.I.C.A. bend over here it comes again
#27
KerryS said:
Write them a letter telling them how much you appreciate the bone. Perhaps in the future the commercials will throw you a few more. Maybe you can roll over and play dead for them.

What you simply stated was that I roll over and play dead.
We can agree to disagree.
It's kinda funny a couple a flyfishermen arguing over a three day fishery that is for all intensive purposes the antithesis of flyfishing, ie. huge lake, huge crowd, meat fishery with gear down deep.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#28
CovingtonFly said:
What you simply stated was that I roll over and play dead.
We can agree to disagree.
It's kinda funny a couple a flyfishermen arguing over a three day fishery that is for all intensive purposes the antithesis of flyfishing, ie. huge lake, huge crowd, meat fishery with gear down deep.
I can see where you might have taken that statement as hostile.

From where I sit the only reason the commercials gave away a few thousand fish is the fact it is a highly visible fisheries and they were looking for some positive press. From the outsider looking in point of view it probably appears as if the commercials are being quite benevolent to the unwashed masses of sport fishermen.