Speying a Glo-Bug: Kosher?

Red Shed

"junkyard spey"
#3
My opinion only. Fishing should be about one's pleasure. If you find pleasure in fishing a glo bug I certainly wouldn't have a problem with it, as long as you weren't flossing them off the beds.
 

thewaker

Tight line takes ain't no fakes!!
#4
kimosabe,

What's really kosher in this world anymore? Everybodys so PC.Someone will always have a problem with it if you talk to enough folks. Speycasting is generally about the cast and the ability to reach out a little farther and control line speed on a swinging fly. I'm sure you know that. That said, do what floats your boat. If you want to huck a lead eyed glo bug around on a spey rod go for it. You shouldn't need permission. While it is not my technique of choice I have on occasion done it and it can be highly effective. Line management and hook setting are much easier on a single hand rod in my opinion.

Mark
 
#5
I'm not an "old school" spey guy, nor do I worry about how other guys fish, but in answer to your question, I would say most "old school" guys would frown on it. I say that based upon responses I have read on a web site that attracts "old school" spey rod guys. Out of curiosity, why do you ask?
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#6
Well, I say if they truly are "old school" spey guys, they'll be using greenheart spey rods (I have one), using heavy wood reels (or big brass reels), old spey line (floating of course) and only using true "spey flies". So if there are any of those guys out there, then they can tell you what they think. I for one say do what you want as long as it's legal to do. Most of us who use a speyrod aren't using it as it was intended. BUT......everything out there is being used differently. So don't worry. If you're having fun and it's not hurting anyone, do it (oh yeah, and the legal thing too lol).
 
#7
What is really interesting to me is not any of the answers that you will get to your question, because I think we already know what the spectrum of answers will be like, but what is interesting is the fact you felt it necessary to ask permission from your peer group in order to gain acceptance from them. But its not like this was the first time someone was worried about fitting in with their peers in the FF community. It seems as though flyfishing for many is more of a social club than getting a fish to bite. Otherwise people would be more interested in making themselves happy regardless of the opinions other people.

But that is just my take on it. :)
 
#8
I thought fly choice did not matter when swinging for steelhead :). As a New School fly fisherman, I swing egg patterns. It is deadly in the fall and winter months when the fish are used to seeing these little dots of protein drift downstream. Just ask my avatar.
 
#9
Steelie Mike said:
I thought fly choice did not matter when swinging for steelhead :). As a New School fly fisherman, I swing egg patterns. It is deadly in the fall and winter months when the fish are used to seeing these little dots of protein drift downstream. Just ask my avatar.
It doesn't matter to some, to others it's a big deal. I would describe those who take issue w/ certain types of flies or techniques as "old school." I suppose we could debate what constitutes "old school," but that would be about as productive as the never-ending debate on swinging vs. nymphing. Makes me no never mind what others put on the end of their line in the name of fly fishing.
 
#10
hi BigTuna, I asked becos I always believed that flyfishing and speying is about the cast...just the art of it and hooking a fish is just icing on the cake.

Not intended to disrespect or cause a rift between old school Speyers :)

Maybe my question just ought to be do you spey with a glo-bug?:)
 
#11
kimosabe said:
hi BigTuna, I asked becos I always believed that flyfishing and speying is about the cast...just the art of it and hooking a fish is just icing on the cake.

Not intended to disrespect or cause a rift between old school Speyers :)

Maybe my question just ought to be do you spey with a glo-bug?:)
Nope:D
 

chadk

Be the guide...
#12
Why does it matter? Who cares? Are you worried someone might be looking over your shoulder while you fish? Do you look over peoples shoulders to see how they fish? :confused:


I asked becos I always believed that flyfishing and speying is about the cast...just the art of it and hooking a fish is just icing on the cake.
If that's true, then perhaps you should put on your leotard and try this out. For the 'traditionalist' and 'artistic' fly fishers out there - this seem right up your ally. Bamboo sticks, silk lines, graceful and fluid movemnet, strict rules, etc:



The Stick - can be of any colour and is made of wood, bamboo, plastic or fibreglass with a maximum diameter of 1cm at it's widest, a cylindrical or conical shape and should have a length of 50 to 60cm (including the fastening ring). The bottom end of the stick may be covered by an adhesive, anti-slip tape or may have a rubber handle for a maximum length of 10 cm at the level of the grip. At the top of the stick, where the ribbon will be attached, may consist of:
1) a supple strap (of string or nylon) held in place by a nylon thread wound round the stick for a maximum 5cm.
2) A metal ring fixed directly onto the stick.
3) a metal ring (vertical, horizontal or oblique) fixed to the stick by two metal pins held in place by nylon or metallic thread round wound around the stick for the maximum 5cm.
4) a metal ring (fixed, mobile or pivoting) or a supple strap, fixed to a metal tip of no more than 3cm, or
5) a metal ring fixed by two metal pins held by a metal tip of 3c long which is lengthened by nylon or metallic thread wound around the stick adding up to a maximum length of 5cm.



The Ribbon - is made of satin or another similar material of any colour, it may be multi-coloured and have designs on it. The ribbon itself must be at least 35g, from 4 to 6cm in width and for senior category a minimum length of 6m (5m for juniors). The ribbon must be in one piece. The end that is attached to the stick, is doubled for a maximum length of 1m, This is stitched down both sides. At the top, a very thin reinforcement or rows of machine stitching for a maximum length of 5cm is authorized. This extremity may end in a strap, or have an eyelet (a small hole, edged with buttonhole stitch or a metal circle), to permit attaching the ribbon.



The Attachment of the Ribbon to the Stick - The ribbon is fixed to the stick by means of a supple attachment such as thread, nylon cord, or a series of articulated rings. The attachment has a maximum length of 7cm, not counting the strap or metal ring at the end of the stick where it will be fastened.

Compulsory elements for the ribbon include flicks, circles, snakes and spirals, and throws. It requires a high degree of co-ordination to form the spirals and circles as any knots which may accidentally form in the ribbon are penalised and any elements done while there is still a knot in the ribbon acquire additional deductions. During a ribbon routine you should look for large, smooth and flowing movements.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribbon_%28rhythmic_gymnastics%29"
:clown: :clown:
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#15
Kimosabe,

Kosher has become pretty much irrelevant to fly fishing anymore. When the pace of change and technical innovation was much slower, fly fishing was as much about tradition as anything. The applecart of tradition has likely been permanently upset by rapid changes in adapting technical changes and technique to the objective of nearly instant results.

I've come to believe that among many, anything passes for fly fishing these days. A few years ago I debated with some Great Lakes area folks that included strip casting (aka chuck & duck) with monofilament nylon line, lead shot slinky weights, and trout nymphs or globugs for flies within their definition of steelhead flyfishing. If someone now tells me they are fly fishing with salmon roe for bait, I'm not going to waste my breath in any further "what is fly fishing" debates.

To the extent that fly fishing is about tradition, I humorously accept fly fishing to be limited to the use of rods made of split cane (or greenheart as Jerry noted above), reels made in England, lines of silk, gut leaders, and flies dressed only with natural materials. The rest of us are just a bunch of disgusting bait goobers.

Regarding your question, I think what it comes down to is whether or not Speycasting a globug is an effective way to fish. Someone mentioned legal, but I hardly see that as the case either, anymore. In WA state, fly fishing regulations formerly prohibited the use of any weighted flies, or weight or shot on leaders, and required that the weight of the fly line to cast the fly. Somewhere over the years, that changed, possibly due to trout fishers desiring to use weighted nymphs or split shot on leaders to sink nymphs to fishing depths, I'm not sure. The upshot is that fly fishing technique has expanded to where a lot of it is barely recognizable when contrasted against its former version.

Is it Kosher? The answer is that it simply doesn't matter.

Sincerely,

Salmo g.
 

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