The ultimate fishing sidearm?

#31
iagree
I am posting here against my better judgement, but am curious what others are doing so differently than I am. I have spent good time in the outdoors, hiking, fishing, hunting, etc. My dog knows well enough to stay away from rattlers. If he comes across a snake he is going to be bitten much quicker than I can pull a gun, get to the snake, aim, shoot, and "defend my dog." And I have yet to have a snake chase down and attack my dog. For all the training that anyone with a bird dog should do, it is not hard to train them away from rattlers - PM me and I will tell you how.

With regards to the "shooting to kill" vs. "shooting in the foot" debate, how about the tried and true, just walk away from your fishing hole strategy. I understand there are dangers from bears, cougar, and the like, but this is more directed at the "personal protection" people. I cannot imagine a possible scenario in which I would "need" a gun to protect myself while fishing. We should all be smart enough to know when to walk away from a specific area. We can all read people well enough to know when potential trouble is around. In those situations, how about just walking away? I understand this is a pain in the ass, and the argument people will have about their "right to fish where they want to fish" but for christ sake...THEY ARE ONLY FISH!!!

Too many people spending too much time worrying how to protect themselves from "the methheads." You want to protect yourself? Get off your asses and go volunteer at a teen center. Or better yet, spend the money you would on a fricking gun and pay for a guide to take someone fishing that otherwise may not understand the wonders of the outdoors. I understand that would take actual effort and be a slower solution to the problem, but I think it is far more constructive than shooting to kill.

my 2 cents.


Pieter
I am more afraid of people carrying guns around my waters than tweaker or animals. This is too creepy.
 

Cliff

Active Member
#32
iagree This subject matter kind of surprised me. I'm not anti-guns but due to my ignorance, they make me unease. I plan on taking some gun classes next summer, but until I know more about them I don't want to be near them and you don't want me around you.
Having said that... I understand they're almost obligatory in Alaska. However I'm not sure if they're really needed in western Washington. If I was to list who I worry most about needing to use a gun on, they'd be in this order. Stoned out humans protecting their meth labs, cougars, black bear and road signs. (Just joking on the last one.;))
My relatives on my father's side of the family are all experienced with guns. One of the things they've pointed out is as ChadK pointed out above. You pull a gun you'd better be ready to use it. They also pointed out that in a high stress situation, you adrenalin is pumping and the first thing to go is your "small motor control". Even cops, and combat experienced individuals know better then to "aim at the foot". That only works on TV.
Personally, I'd like to hear if anybody on this forum has needed to use a gun while fishing, or experienced a situation where they wished they had one. If so please share it with us.

Well, I have a story. I've told this before and I know others on the board (and elsewhere) who remember it. In 1993 a buddy and I were on a fishing trip to Blue Lake in the Sinlahekin. After a very late dinner in Okanagon, we decided to stop and camp at a large meadow just off the Conc-to-Sinlahekin road, not far from Conc. There's a small lake just north of there along the road that used to hold brookies and we wanted to fish it in the morning. I'm sure many of you have seen it a thousand times. We were parked about 30 yards off the road and were setting up camp, when we heard a loud pounding of a rig coming along the track (from Conc) that was obviously driving way too fast. I was in the woods about 50ft away from my pickup gathering firewood. My buddy was in the opposite direction doing the same. My truck was parked facing the road and the tailgate was down with a lighted coleman lantern it. When I turned and saw the truck coming down the path I was a bit surprised because the guy was really moving. It was an ancient Chevy Fleetside with a spotlight on top of the cab, and the guy was swiveling the spot back and forth. As soon as he rounded the curve and saw our rig he slammed on his breaks and skidded sideways a long distance, then ground his gears trying to get it in reverse. I just had a bad feeling about this, so I dropped my load of wood and sprinted for my truck, where I had an old .22 revolver behind the seat, unloaded. By the time I had my door open and attempting to load it, my buddy stuck his head in the passenger window and said something like, "what's going on with that guy". No sooner had the words left his mouth when we heard the first gunshot. It was a huge muzzle flash and very loud. It scared me silly and I dropped my shells on the seat. I tried to scoop up a couple of shells from the seat try to load them again, and then the second shot rang out. It was so loud and close it lit up the whole area. I lost it at that point and dropped the revolver and ran. The dome light from the truck cab was illuminating me and I probably made a pretty good target. As I ran around the side of my truck three more loud gunshots rang out, just as loud as the first. My buddy and I sprinted out of camp and ran straight up a hill, but we lost track of each other. I was on a very steep hillside on the uphill side of a tree, keeping myself from rolling back down by pressing my feet against the tree trunk. All I had with me was a little Swiss Army knife, so I opened it up and held it in my hand. I had lost track of my friend, but as it turns out he stayed below in the bushes. Neither one of us saw or heard anything after those shots in our panic to run, but we didn't know if the guy was still there or if he had left. I could see a bit of light in the trees below thrown from my coleman lantern, and I kept watching for someone walking around below me. After probably 20 minutes I began to grow extremely sleepy. So sleepy I couldn't keep my eyes open. I didn't understand it at the time, but since then I've read that people who find themselves in extreme stress of this type sometimes come down from the adrenaline and feel that way. Strange. Anyway, after about an hour I heard my buddy calling to me in a very low voice. We could not see nor hear any activity down by the camp, so we came down off the hill and cut through the woods towards Concunully for several hundred yards or so, then made a very cautious approach in the dark back down the track to where our camp was. The white pickup was gone. We tossed all of our stuff in the back and hightailed it back to town and slept in the town park in Concunully. In the morning I made a police report over the phone from the store, and the next day we drove up to Blue to fish. On the way up we stopped at our camp from the previous night and looked for any signs from the weird night, and I found five empty .44 magnum shell casings on the road in front of our camp. For some reason the guy ejected his shells right there. We were both so tired from the previous evening we didn't get much fishing in at Blue.

I have no idea why this person did what he did. The Okanagon Deputy I spoke with thought he might have been a drunk and pissed off poacher, but we'll never know for sure. But I can tell you this - I will never, ever, find myself in a position where I am unable to defend myself like this (swiss army knife vs. .44 magnum). My whole life flashed through my mind as I lay hidden on that hillside with that rediculous little knife in my hands. Mostly, I thought about my wife and my kids and how much I would miss them. Was this a fluke? Probably. Will it ever happen again? Probably not. But since that event I almost always carry a handgun with me when I go afield. The gun I usually go with is a little S&W Centennial in .38 Special. It carrys concealed or in a pocket and no one ever sees it. I do a LOT of high lakes fishing and backpacking, and I rarely carry a handgun in the high country, but I do pack a handgun in areas where there are humans.

Cliff
 
#33
Cool concept. I can see how it could be used in a grouse drive by rather than a snake encounter :clown:. A rock or stick can serve the same purpose but it would be a cool toy to have. Reminds me of the Springfield Armory Scout 410/.22cal except in a pistol.

http://www.gunrunnerauctions.com/listings/details/index.cfm?itemnum=862516017



I have a few handguns from a compact .22 cal to a few full sized pistols of various calibers. Too be honest, I've never packed while fishing in WA although I would. When I lived in NM that was a different story…
 
#34
Cliff, thanks for the story of your past experience. I'd just about given up on this board for anything substantive, but your post was informative and well written. It makes a good point.

Sterling
 

PT

Physhicist
#35
iagree

I am more afraid of people carrying guns around my waters than tweaker or animals. This is too creepy.
What's creepy to me is that too many people can't differentiate between a responsible, law abiding citizen and those who act without good judgement.

Can someone else here explain this better than me? In areas where there is more gun ownership and folks carrying legally the crime level is substantially lower than in areas that are considered target rich environments (anti-gun, anti-cwp) areas. That is something I've heard over and over and just seems to make sense. I believe the statistics I've read about it but don't know how to put it into words.
 
#36
Cliff - Great story... well, in the sense of illustrating that you never know what's out there. I used to go out near Mt. Baker to pan for gold. I was out one time and had a couple guys take an unusual interest to my activities and if I had found anything. I'm not sure that they would have been dangerous, but I did get a bad vibe off them. Another time out there, by myself in the middle of nowhere I hiked up to a small creek. I started to pan but got the wierd creepy feeling that somebody was watching. I packed up and started heading back, in a previously empty field where very large prints in the snow heading in the direction I had just come from. I've had people flash guns, but have never been shot at. I'm going to be picking up a small 9 in the next few weeks and will probably keep it with me when I go out.

Scott
 

Cliff

Active Member
#38
Cliff - Great story... well, in the sense of illustrating that you never know what's out there. I used to go out near Mt. Baker to pan for gold. I was out one time and had a couple guys take an unusual interest to my activities and if I had found anything. I'm not sure that they would have been dangerous, but I did get a bad vibe off them. Another time out there, by myself in the middle of nowhere I hiked up to a small creek. I started to pan but got the wierd creepy feeling that somebody was watching. I packed up and started heading back, in a previously empty field where very large prints in the snow heading in the direction I had just come from. I've had people flash guns, but have never been shot at. I'm going to be picking up a small 9 in the next few weeks and will probably keep it with me when I go out.

Scott

Scott, I've heard a very similar story from a hiker who had some problems with miners near some high, remote diggings. Sometimes bad things happen, and I think the key is to be aware of them, but not paranoid. I have to admit that it was literally years before I felt totally comfortable while camping near humans. Every time I'd hear a car drive by or see distant headlights in the night I would become fully awake, and wait for them to pass by. My buddy who endured that night with me told me the same thing, kind of like vets talking about something they had experienced in war. Now, I don't think about it much, but the pistol is there with me in the truck, just like the shovel, axe, water jug, coleman stove, etc. It's just one of the tools.

Cliff
 
#39
What's creepy to me is that too many people can't differentiate between a responsible, law abiding citizen and those who act without good judgement.

Can someone else here explain this better than me? In areas where there is more gun ownership and folks carrying legally the crime level is substantially lower than in areas that are considered target rich environments (anti-gun, anti-cwp) areas. That is something I've heard over and over and just seems to make sense. I believe the statistics I've read about it but don't know how to put it into words.
I've heard that said by people that advocate or defend the idea about everybody carrying a gun. (Like after that campus shooting this summer.) I don't buy it. The United States has the highest gun ownership AND murder rate in the western world. I've lived in other countries in Europe and their murder rate combined don't approach ours.
Guns aren't the problem. I think it's the gun culture/mentality that we've grown up with. I've said before, and I'll stress it again. I'm NOTanti-gun. I own some guns, but it's irresponsible gun owners, and our culture that equates manhood with gun ownership/use that just provides fuel for the rabid anti-gunners.! :beathead:
 
#40
What's creepy to me is that too many people can't differentiate between a responsible, law abiding citizen and those who act without good judgement.

Can someone else here explain this better than me? In areas where there is more gun ownership and folks carrying legally the crime level is substantially lower than in areas that are considered target rich environments (anti-gun, anti-cwp) areas. That is something I've heard over and over and just seems to make sense. I believe the statistics I've read about it but don't know how to put it into words.
What??? More guns = less crime. Is that similar to more weapons = less war? Listen, TP the bottom line is without a gun nobody gets shot. Doesn't mean you can't get injured on the river but what are the odds? If they are high, then we should all carry guns all the time. There's always a chance at something happening anywhere you go. And what are the odds of you being able to effectively use your weapon at the right time, have the same perception of the situation, come out without an injury or killing someone, avoid jail time, not feel guilty about shooting someone, etc.

Obviously nobody is going to change your mind but my thought is that I'd rather risk an occasional freak than think I need a gun to solve a problem.


Check out http://www.bradycampaign.org/facts/research/?page=lott_mglc&menu=pro for some more info.

I do agree that guns aren't the problem and people are. But in the US we have a lot of problem people.

BTW...IF MORE GUNS = LESS CRIME, HOW DO YOU FIGURE YOUR RIVERSIDE ATTACKER KNOWS YOU HAVE A GUN??? AND HOW DO ALL CRIMINALS EDUCATE THEMSELVES THAT THIS IS A HIGH GUN OWNERSHIP AREA.
 
#42
my 9mm is too bulky most of the time so my next carry is the S&W ultra light 357. My friend has one and it is great! Tons of knock down power and light as hell. Shooting the 357 rounds are a bit harsh but its nice to be able to pratice with the .38 rounds with it.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#44
Warm weather, gorgeous women, blue water..... Yeah, I guess that wouldn't be that great.
iagreeAfter living in Hawaii for nearly 10 years, I visited Florida and it sucked immensely. There is no comparison. I couldn't get back to Honolulu fast enough...climate, beaches, people, surf, gorgeous women, integrity in presidential elections....Hawaii kicks butt over Florida in all regards...I'm embarassed to even mention the two states in the same sentence. I lived there nearly 13 years, and I'd go back except i can no longer handle the sun exposure. I never want to go to Florida again. Never.

If I think I need a sidearm, I'm just gonna saw off the barrel of my 12 gage magnum pump, take out the plug, and carry that badboy slung over my shoulder. I don't hunt any more, and that sounds like a good use for it.:rofl:
 
#45
BTW...IF MORE GUNS = LESS CRIME, HOW DO YOU FIGURE YOUR RIVERSIDE ATTACKER KNOWS YOU HAVE A GUN??? AND HOW DO ALL CRIMINALS EDUCATE THEMSELVES THAT THIS IS A HIGH GUN OWNERSHIP AREA.
The same way non criminals educate themselvs that an area is a high crime area. It's much eaiser to do if one does not have his head up his own butt. It is legal to carry a side arm if a background check is passed and Kent has every right to ask about the quality and usefullness of this firearm. These are questions responsible gun owners ask. A gun is a tool. Would you stomp on a carpenters thread if he was asking if a Stilleto or FatMax was a better framing hammer? Why not? A framing hammer is just as deadly as a gun? :confused: Start you own thread and stomp on it.
 

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