New Camera NFR (Canon G9)

#16
With Chris' observation will hold off for awhile, still looking for the perfect prosumer camera.

The ones I use now do a great job, I'm trying to get away from the dslr group with a p&s, guess it won't happen any time soon, although they can do it.:rolleyes:

Thanks everyone:)
 
#19
After doing a few months of research on it (I'm a little OCD like that), I decided to buy the G9, and picked it up today from Circuit City for $399 (after coupon)...

It is $439 on their website. Don't pay the full store price.

Anyways, from what I have gathered, it is a very good camera.

It is very heavy, and the only disadvantage in my mind is how small it is. Its basically a two hand camera, but with some small modifications (usually a pistol grip) you can make it a one hand.

I also like it because I SCUBA dive, and it has an inexpensive underwater housing from Ikelite.
 

creekx

spent spinner
#20
New Camera NFR

It's also worth remembering that like guns, it's people, not cameras, that take pictures. Even having the best camera in the world is no guarantee that someone with a tin eye will take nothing but excellent pictures. The opposite is also true.

K
Wasn't it Ansel Adams that said (paraphrasing) "The most important part of the camera is the 12" behind it.":ray1:

We photographers used to debate such things as Fujichrome Velvia vs. Kodachrome 64, etc. Now a bunch of techno-geeks have managed to convince a gullible public that photography is no longer a subjective art - it's now a technical pursuit measured strictly and objectively by counting pixels.:beathead:

I'll continue to be content taking photographs with my 6.1 MP DSLR, while others snap pictures with their 12 MP pocket cameras.
 

Josh

dead in the water
#21
New Camera NFR

t's now a technical pursuit measured strictly and objectively by counting pixels.
Pointless tech nerdiness is not reserved for the digital age. Photographers have been debating lens test-chart results and MTF graphs for decades now. Not to mention film grain acutance and resolving power.
 
#22
My wife is the photography buff, not I but it still means I get to play with a Nikkon D80. Sad part is I just leave the thing on automatic and point and shoot when it could do so much more.
 

creekx

spent spinner
#23
New Camera NFR

Pointless tech nerdiness is not reserved for the digital age. Photographers have been debating lens test-chart results and MTF graphs for decades now. Not to mention film grain acutance and resolving power.
True, there always have been and always will be "measurebaters". It's just more pervasive and annoying now.
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#24
New Camera NFR

Pointless tech nerdiness is not reserved for the digital age. Photographers have been debating lens test-chart results and MTF graphs for decades now. Not to mention film grain acutance and resolving power.
Excellent observation.

It's worth considering that as an artform, photography - even digital photography - is still among the least immediate of the media, requiring a considerable number of intermediate steps between the initial vision and the final print on the gallery wall.

Sadly, most of those intermediate steps are and have always been mainly technical in nature, which is appealing to those who rely more on their left brain's tendency towards empirical analysis. Put another way: artists create while technicians debate.

K
 
#25
You might want to consider the Pentax Optio W60. It is good to 13 foot depth. This is enough for shallow reef dives. If more is needed you might consider the Olympus 1030 which is good to 33 feet and would do for most dives. Obviously either would do for the occasional dump in a creek or lake. Not as high quality as the Canon, but the other features are a real plus. Just my 0.02
 

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