Sand shrimp and coonstripe shrimp overlooked food source for Puget Sound fisheries

#17
I can't find anything online about Roger's Sand Shrimp and cannot afford the awesome book the pattern is mentioned in, would anyone be willing to help out with the makeup of this pattern?

Bill
 

chrome/22

For him there whould always be the riddle of steel
#19
Peninsula Outfitters
19740 7th Ave NE
Poulsbo, WA 98370

They had the BEST shrimp fly I've ever seen. Picked one up, yet to fish it. Super realistic, but as you'd imagine..... spendy


c/22
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#20
Look at bonefish flies. There are several that are shrimp mimics and in the clear tropical waters, they have to be pretty good matches.
Steve
 

flyfisherman_sean

Fly fishing enthusiast.
#22
I've been wanting to fish more shrimp patterns in the Sound. Does anyone know where I can purchase "magic shrimp" patterns like in the picture? This guy is in Scandanavia and does not sell his flies, but I want to buy something similar. View attachment 129998
I've been tying up some realistic ones similar to that but in a different color. They look awesome and have been doing pretty good.
 

skyrise

Active Member
#23
Roger, i dont know about coonstripe but sand shrimp have been a staple in any drift fishing steelheaders bait box for many years now. back in the day we used dig them up in and around the mud flats in north sound beaches. if they are the same ones you are talking about, they are about 3-4" long pale on the belly but orange on top. and still very popular. summer runs love em.
 

seattlee

Active Member
#24
Peninsula Outfitters
19740 7th Ave NE
Poulsbo, WA 98370

They had the BEST shrimp fly I've ever seen. Picked one up, yet to fish it. Super realistic, but as you'd imagine..... spendy


c/22
Thanks! I will give Peninsula Outfitters a call...I don't get out to Poulsbo much, but maybe I should make a trip.

The super-realistic shrimp patterns seem to have a dedicated following in Europe for sea trout, but not so much in the US.
 
#27
All src anglers owe it to themselves to add a few of these to their box. One of my most consistent producers since I started tying them a year or so ago


Thanks! I will give Peninsula Outfitters a call...I don't get out to Poulsbo much, but maybe I should make a trip.

The super-realistic shrimp patterns seem to have a dedicated following in Europe for sea trout, but not so much in the US.
 
#28
Mark Mercer's excellent Squimp pattern is one worth considering. Perfect colors to imitate a shrimp.
http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/threads/the-squimp.73393/

Perhaps he'll chime in a post a picture of his most recent version if he has done any tweaks to it since the thread link I posted was created back in 2012.
SF
Thanks Brian, if anyone's interested in the pattern here's a photo of the original and the SBS of the newer version which is pretty much all I tie on anymore, but they both work equally well.

http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/threads/the-new-rabbit-cutthroat-squimp-sbs.85663/

I really believe realistic patterns are more for the tier then the fish, I think the best patterns are simpler with key elements that will trigger a strike, imo cutts or rezzies don't need a exact intimation just has to look like something alive and eatable and familiar.

The only exception I've found might be when they're feeding on amphipods in winter but even then I've been able to catch em throwing a squimp next to the pod, just seems to work for me.

Mark

DSCN1589.JPG
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#29
upload_2016-12-15_8-13-11.png
\
I use this guy dead drifted, sometimes under an indicator, over mudflats and gullies when the shrimp float out on the tide. When you see terns not diving, but hovering and then lowering to nip off the water surface, check to see if these guys are floating by. Just as they are getting hammered from the air, they are getting hammered below by perch and cutts. The fly is about 1.25-1.5 inches long, and anything super light tan to light orange would work. Behind that heavy collar is some rabbit fur, just like Mark's Squimp, instead of a carapice topping it, I tie with the strands pointing hookside down, so when it is wet the strands look a little like eggs or legs, the rabbit is a few shades lighter than the tail because the legs and eggs look a few shades lighter when they float by. The tail is old stuffed animal and a little stiffer, the eyes are plastic barbell, these guys don't sink, they are floating between two inches and 1 foot below surface.
 
Last edited:
#30
View attachment 130120 \
I use this guy dead drifted, sometimes under an indicator, over mudflats and gullies when the shrimp float out on the tide. When you see terns not diving, but hovering and then lowering to nip off the water surface, check to see if these guys are floating by. Just as they are getting hammered from the air, they are getting hammered below by perch and cutts. The fly is about 1.25-1.5 inches long, and anything super light tan to light orange would work. Behind that heavy collar is some rabbit fur, just like Mark's Squimp, instead of a carapice topping it, I tie with the strands pointing hookside down, so when it is wet the strands look a little like eggs or legs, the rabbit is a few shades lighter than the tail because the legs and eggs look a few shades lighter when they float by. The tail is old stuffed animal and a little stiffer, the eyes are plastic barbell, these guys don't sink, they are floating between two inches and 1 foot below surface.
Great pattern Wadin' !!!! I'd think it would work pretty much anywhere in the salt or estuaries.
I also tie the squimp in a off white (squid) and a peach (or coral) color which is similar to yours. Nice fly !

Mark
 

Latest posts