Sinking line selection

#16
Whether I use a sink-tip or a full sink usually depends on the water depth or how I want to present my fly. Both have their purpose. The sink-tip is great in shallow lakes (ie. Lone) in that you can have a lot of line out (cover more water) and not snag the bottom as much. I use mine as somewhat of a shooting head also. Treat the floating part as your running line, it will throw my Pass Lake streamers nicely. If you want to contol depth close in or just get it down and fish it deep, then the full sink wins out. It is also a quick "poor man's chironomid set up" as Stonefish noted. That's why I carry both.
 
#17
Clear Intermediate
Type III
Rio Deep 7

My clear Intermediate and Deep 7 see the bulk of the time on my reel. The only time I use the Deep 7 is fishing leeches and chronomids/bloodworms, but that's at least 50% of my fishing. My Intermediate is the one line I would not want to be without. My Type III line at times acquires a lot of dust, but I still want it in my vest.
Good question Ive.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#19
Much of this dovetails with what I have been doing. The Cortland Clear Camo Intermediate has been my go-to lake line for years followed closely by a Type VI full sink. Between those I have a variety of III's IV's and various sink tips but their use has never become as clearly defined as the intermediate and the VI. I need to modernize some of my lines and have heard some good suggestions here. I also have a better idea of what to tell the noobs.

But I have a question about the vari-tip lines and their loop-to-loop connection. Since most are in the neighborhood of 12', doesn't retrieving that connection when landing a fish pose some problems? I often have difficulty just bringing the fly line to leader connection through the tip top smoothly even though I make precise nail knot connections and smooth them over with glue.

One thing I am relatively certain of though is that I catch more fish using floro than regular mono tippet material. I have waited several years to say that unequivocally but by now there is little doubt.

Thanks for all your input.

Ive
 

Go Fish

Language, its a virus
#20
I have been fishing the Clear Camo for
over 10 years. It has been my go-to
lake line. I'll even use it in deeper lakes
(like Dry Falls or Cady) with a long line weighted
dropper. It's not a true intermediate line
because it will continue to sink if you are
not moving very fast which allows your fly
to be at the correct depth for a longer
period of time.

Dave
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#21
Ive,
I personally don't use my multi-tip line in lakes. I only use it in rivers.
Getting the loop to loop connection through the rod tip really isn't that bad. Getting it back out is more of a hassle in my opinion.
For sink tip work, I use the good old 10' integrated tip with a floating running line that have been around for years.

Dave,
You are right about the Cortland Camo intermediate. It will continue to sink at a pretty good rate. I've got a very old SA intermediate that I've used for years. The first time I fished it I would have sworn it was a floater that had been mis-labeled. It floats for a short while before sinking incredibly slow.
SF
 

Richard E

Active Member
#22
Ive,
I personally don't use my multi-tip line in lakes. I only use it in rivers.
Getting the loop to loop connection through the rod tip really isn't that bad. Getting it back out is more of a hassle in my opinion.
For sink tip work, I use the good old 10' integrated tip with a floating running line that have been around for years.

Dave,
You are right about the Cortland Camo intermediate. It will continue to sink at a pretty good rate. I've got a very old SA intermediate that I've used for years. The first time I fished it I would have sworn it was a floater that had been mis-labeled. It floats for a short while before sinking incredibly slow.
SF
I know the Cortland Camo intermediate lines are popular, but I'm not as much a fan of them. They can get a lot of memory, and if you like to cast lines (which I do), its gets frustrating untangling them. I prefer the standard full sinking lines, and a line like a Uniform Sink Type II casts better (to me) than the clear intermediate.

So, in order of preference (for me):

(1) Floater
(2) tie: Type II uniform sink or type III sink tip
(3) Type III full sink (not uniform sink; in some fishing instances I like the fact the line bellies)
 

Go Fish

Language, its a virus
#23
Yes its true that the Cortland Camo can
be a kinky bitch which is ok.... but not in a fly
line. I'm just a bit more carefull of how I put it into my
stripping basket which minimizes the tangles.

Dave
 
#24
I don't have any trouble with the loops going through the guided. You definitely know they are there, but they don't create much resistance. As for the nail knots, I use Hard as Nails fingernail polish and form a glob of it in a footbal like shape over the knot. It seems to help.
 
#25
My intermediate is the old-school Cortland "ice blue" line. It casts better and sinks slower than the camo. Killer for hand-twist retrieves that need to be in the top 1-3'.

The Rio Aqualux has taken the place of both my type II and III full sink lines. It casts well for a clear line and gets it done in the 6-12' depth range.

My other sinker is a type VI. Great for all the reasons others have mentioned.
 
#26
I use:
Floating line, sink tip, medium sinking, and fast sinking line. Depending on what the fish are doing and how deep the lake is. But if you have those four lines you should do well.

Keith
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#27
. . .But I have a question about the vari-tip lines and their loop-to-loop connection. Since most are in the neighborhood of 12', doesn't retrieving that connection when landing a fish pose some problems? I often have difficulty just bringing the fly line to leader connection through the tip top smoothly even though I make precise nail knot connections and smooth them over with glue.
I just got back from 3 days fishing Henry's Lake in Idaho where three other guys and I had a great time fishing for big, dumb Yellowstone cutts. Although large at 4 x 5 miles, Henry's Lake is shallow with a max depth of just over 20 feet. Since wind is a constant challenge there, most fishing is confined to within a hundred yards or so of shore unless you don't mind being several hours late for dinner after being blown across the lake.

Fishing that close to shore also means dealing with large fields of underwater vegetation. Since all the fish we caught were taken on subsurface patterns, keeping the pattern out of the 'salad' was difficult with a full sinking line, even the slow-sinking clear intermediate that my partners all used.

I brought along a Rio Versa-Tip that saw it's first action on Thursday. The Type III tip and a 7 foot 2x leader was the perfect choice in keeping the fly about 3-4 feet down but yet out of all but the thickest weed beds. Stripping the line in can be a challenge in getting the connector loops through the tip top. The trick is to keep the rod tip submerged and pointed in the same direction as the line. Once it gets through the tip, then it rarely gets hung up on the snake guides.

Most of the fish we took were between 18 and 22" long an 2-3 pounds but one big guy I landed measured 28" and perhaps 7 pounds. Easily the largest trout I'd ever caught, it took some doing to get just his front half into the puny net I was using. But playing him really stretched out the line which made the loop to loop connector even more compact and easier to get through the tip top.

K
 
#28
Kent -
I'll have to remember that trick next time I'm out with my versatip. All I have to do is catch a 28", 7 lb fish and the problem will disappear!

I guess with fishing like that you didn't visit the stream I mentioned to you...

Dick
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#29
I'll have to remember that trick next time I'm out with my versatip. All I have to do is catch a 28", 7 lb fish and the problem will disappear!
That's right - simple, eh?

I was at the mercy of my three hosts so sadly we didn't explore as much as I'd have liked. I could have spent a couple days on the Madison alone.

Sigh.

K