Cast and Swing...no mending?

#32
I am no pro but I can give some advice on what I have learned. I think alot has to do with the depth of the water, the area you are trying to swing, the bug you are swinging and how your cast lays. I think a swing can definetly be manipulated by a mend. Summer wet flies or even spring casting down stream a little and a gentle upwards drop of your rod just swing it out. Sink tips with weighted flies in the winter I chose the method in dec's book. A quick pull to straighten your line to sink tip to bug and follow it down droppin your rod slowly throught the swing. If fishing shallow water your bug may not need to sink as far so a nice cast more down river than straight across no need to mend but to getter down mendin will get you there. Never ever ever mend during swing one irregularity may lose you the only fish you come accross.
 
#35
Bob,
I agree with casting more downstream and less 90 degrees across. When I practice in the backyard, my sinktip often lands in a "L" shape. When I'm on the river, I perform a line lift or pull back as soon as the line lands to straighten the sinktip out before it sinks. Then if needed I mend. I'm curious if you do this as well.
John
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#36
Prior to the onset of the current crop of super fast sinking lines, I used a 15' SA High Speed Hi-D sink tip for over 90% of my winter fishing on a single hand rod. My "normal" cast was across and upcurrent to maximize the amount of time for my tip and fly to sink to depth. Not mending would have made for totally useless presentations most of the time. Generally I'd do a reach mend with the line in the air. give a quick pull after the line hit the water to line up the fly, leader, and sink tip, and then make an initial on-the-water mend of the belly of the line wherever it needed to go, usually upstream. Subsequent mends were made as needed and in the direction needed or not made at all if not needed. I hope I wasn't doing it wrong because I caught a shitload of steelhead.

Sg
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#38
So it doesn't matter whether I do it right or wrong now I take it. However, had I done it some of the ways described in this thread, I think I would have accounted for far fewer steelhead, but I can't and wouldn't want to prove it.

Sg
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#39
I could go into a long monologue about what the different mends do in the different currents at different water flows on different rivers for different runs of fish at different times of the year...but I won't.
I do whatever it takes to get my fly to where I think the fish are. And lately I'm thinking my fly needs to be down around Oregon...
 
#40
I hope I wasn't doing it wrong because I caught a shitload of steelhead.
Sg
As scooby doo would say... "HUH??"
Sounds like you are successful to me...

That's how I normally (try to at least) would perform my mends, yet i've only manage to catch one this way, so either I'm not doing it correctly or you have been fishing in the right spot at the right time all these years.
 

James Mello

Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"
#41
Most guys are casting too close to 90 degrees across current, which forces you to mend, casting unnecessarily long, which forces you to mend, or casting from a lousy position in conflicting or unfavorable currents, which forces you to mend. Fishing strategically and working the near seam has almost eliminated excessive mending from my fishing, and increased my catch rate too. I'm placing the fly better than I did before. I like to fish in an upstream breeze. I'll take a lie from a carefully considered spot so the line can sweep sweetly through. There's lots of tricks. Would it make you feel better if I said it this way...I don't mend anywhere near as much as I used to. But I still need to now and then, I have to mend line on every outing, but certainly not on every or even most casts. Some water may demand that, it does depend on the water. I hardly have to mend on the Cowlitz, hardly ever. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
Here's one from NewYear's day. A nice curve cast placed the fly at 60 degrees to current, swung the seam without a touch of mending, and got hammered on the way out of the seam.
View attachment 28117
regards, Bob
Reading this just brings out the religion in all of us. Personally I think that too many people actually don't cast with enough angle (or more accurately don't think of the required casting angle for their swing) I will agree that lots of folks who do cast often cast outside of the likely place a steelhead would live, but that's a separate issue entirely.

Also ,iit's kind of funny you mention the 90 degree thing in relation to the Cowlitz. I find there are several runs where 90 degrees is the preferred casting angle to not mend at all, and in some of the water that's deeper and slower where an upstream with no mend is the best way of presentation for me.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#42
Geez guys. After reading all of this shit it made me think. I did Spey fish for a while but I didn't like it so I gave it up. But when ever I fished streamers I did the across cast and let the current swing the fly. I never mended either with a single hander or the Spey rod. But I do when I nymph. I try to keep the flies in the zone and out of the back eddies.

Jim
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#43
Reading this just brings out the religion in all of us. Personally I think that too many people actually don't cast with enough angle (or more accurately don't think of the required casting angle for their swing) I will agree that lots of folks who do cast often cast outside of the likely place a steelhead would live, but that's a separate issue entirely.

Also ,iit's kind of funny you mention the 90 degree thing in relation to the Cowlitz. I find there are several runs where 90 degrees is the preferred casting angle to not mend at all, and in some of the water that's deeper and slower where an upstream with no mend is the best way of presentation for me.
Speaking of the Cowlitz, I have a friend who is also new to spey fishing and we're thinking about floating the Cowlitz as a "cuttin our teeth" trip. I've floated BC to Massey's Bar tons of times when we use to terminal tackle fish....but it's been awhile. Would you recommend this section or another for better spey water?
Thanks
 

Don Davis

Formerly FlyCatcherman, formerly Don_The_Fly
#44
To mend or not to mend, that is the question.
what I learned is that the water moves faster at the surface than underneath. What you are trying to do is keep the line from accelerating past your fly or dragging it up. Also what are the surface currents doing? If your line is going from soft current to faster current, you'll probably need to mend at least once. If you quarter cast down stream and the line is behind your fly, then rarely is a mends necessary. Once the line is at the end of the swing the fly will drift up more slowly, retrieve your line and cast again. Casting at 90 degrees (straight out or upstream) the line will accelerate past your fly and start to yank it off the bottom. It is easier to see the effects by putting a strike indicator on just to see where your line is in relationship to where you saw your fly land. Knowing that the fly on the bottom is going to move more slowly than the line on the surface, you would mend to keep the line above the fly and let the fly drift. once you have the sense of where your fly is, remove the indicator and keep watch on the line. Where you cast and what the current is doing really is going to dictate whether you need to mend or not. I'm just sayin.....
 

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