When will the Skagit Steelhead become extinct?

How long before Skagit Steelhead are extinct?

  • 20 years

    Votes: 24 64.9%
  • 40 years

    Votes: 6 16.2%
  • 60 years

    Votes: 1 2.7%
  • 80 years

    Votes: 6 16.2%

  • Total voters
    37

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#3
There's always a few that make it up the rivers. The Skagit is a big river. It's hard to put a time on anything. I thought I would be dead by the age of 50. Hell, I'm still here.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#4
They may already be gone, and the rare steelhead in the skagit is merely lost or exploring at to why none of his pals are headed up that way.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#5
I didn't vote for any of the choices. I don't think they will go completely extinct. I do believe we may have seen the last of steelhead fishing for a number of years on the Skagit if not forever.

Looking at my sled and the half dozen or more spey rods I got wondering if I can get enough money out of it all to buy a decent salt water boat. Then again it is likely only a matter of time before they close the sound down. Maybe I will get me one of those big ass bass boats and join the tour.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#6
While WW prefers us to draw an emotional response, extinction comes in flavors. Extinct for direct exploitation (commercial, tribal, recreational harvest) - right now and with little chance that the local situation will change in the next several hundred years. Extinct for catch and release (indirect exploitation, C&R mortality) - if not now, in the near term. Genetically extinct - 10,000+ years from now during the next expansion of glaciers out of BC (the next coming of the Vashon glaciation - assuming that global warming hasn't disrupted that process). As long as there are rainbow trout in the Skagit, the Skagit steelhead persist. As long as fish stray from river to river, Skagit steelhead persist.

Steve
 
#7
I hope never. 3 years ago a buddy of mine was fishing with me in my drift boat and he hooked 20# + steelhead. It straightened the hook before it broke off. I saw it several times and it had the girth of a king. They're in there, just not like the glory days of old. It just makes it that much more special when you do get into them.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#8
I agree with Cabezon. They're not going to go extinct as a stock. They are functionally extinct as a fishery for us however. It's likely to be that way for all Puget Sound stocks for the foreseeable and indefinite future. The sport fishery is over. R.I.P.

Sg
 
#9
I'm tempted to answer something like "About six months before I put a gun in my mouth."

That's facetious and inaccurate; I'll be dead of natural causes before then. Perhaps a more relevant question would be something like "How long before all Puget Sound rivers are closed to all steelhead fishing, indefinitely?" (Which brings up a related question: When that happens, will a single WDFW official, Commission member, Governor or legislator lose his/her job?)
 

Plecoptera

Active Member
#11
No vote for me either. There is no way they will be extinct in the next 80 years. The current trend indicates we probably wont be fishing for them in 80 years though...
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#12
While WW prefers us to draw an emotional response, extinction comes in flavors. Extinct for direct exploitation (commercial, tribal, recreational harvest) - right now and with little chance that the local situation will change in the next several hundred years. Extinct for catch and release (indirect exploitation, C&R mortality) - if not now, in the near term. Genetically extinct - 10,000+ years from now during the next expansion of glaciers out of BC (the next coming of the Vashon glaciation - assuming that global warming hasn't disrupted that process). As long as there are rainbow trout in the Skagit, the Skagit steelhead persist. As long as fish stray from river to river, Skagit steelhead persist.

Steve
Nice comment Steve. Extinction in flavors - that gets the brain to working.
Skagit Steelhead have become window dressing for the environment...pretty to look at, but don't touch. Does a thing like that have any value?
 
#13
Just perhaps the sharp decline of Puget Sound steelhead is the result in part to some natural cycle going on in the ocean. We see this all the time with salmon numbers.
Maybe if we do all we can to restore the estuaries and improve river habitat in general when the ocean cycle changes a rebound will occur.
Many poulations of animals are cyclic. Perhaps this is what we are experiencing with steelhead.

Dave
 

Smalma

Active Member
#14
I also did not vote for any of the choices.

While steelhead in the Puget Sound region are in serious trouble IMHO our beloved Skagit steelhead were not and are not facing extinction! While they will never be as abundant as they were historically (never even close) there is more than enough quality habitat (major key headwater pieces are within wilderness areas or the NCNP) to assure that are grandkids could see a wild Skagit/Sauk steelhead if they so desired. In fact the bain's steelhead population is more secure today than at the time of the ESA listing thanks to extensive Wild Salmonid Managment Areas (WSMAs) in the basin. The Skagit between the mouth of the Cascade and the dams, the Cascade above the Rockport-Cascade RD bridge, and all of the Sauk were established as WSMAs several years ago.

Like they rivers they live steelhead populations are dynamic. As much as we like for some things to remain the same (whether a favorite run or good smolt survival) anyone who has been around our anadromous salmonid populations for more than a couple of decades realizes the one constant is change. A huge driver in the current abundance of Skagit steelhead is the marine survival of their smolts. It is now clear that survival is currently very low and it is also clear that such survival is cyclic and we will see improvement in that suvival. The question is when will that cyclic begin an upswing? and how much will it improve? Past records (mostly from the salmon world) indicate those survival (and the weather patterns that drive much of that survival) are typically 2 or 3 decades long. If this current cycle is typical we could be crawling out it soon (in fact there are some hopeful signs that things are beginning to improve). Further it will take only a modest increases in that survival to see much more robust runs of Skagit wild steelhead.

However that does not mean that we will be fishing for them in any meaningful way anytime soon. In fact I recently came to the realization that unless there is some sort of dramatic and very unexpected change in the thinking of the managers (NMFS, State, and Tribes) and the wild steelhead advocates what few years I have left to wade my favorite waters will not include fishing for Skagit steelhead.

Tight lines
Curt
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#15
Don't have an truly educated guess, but a speculative guess would say they will outlast me my 4 year old son and his children's children.

Ira