what fly line for boat fishing? (tuna, albacore or bluefish )

yuhina

Tropical member
#1
Hey folks,

I was wondering what is your favorite line or taper for boat fishing (tuna, albacore)? I don't have too much experience in fishing from a boat. A recent outing have created some frustrations... I wonder if the saltwater (boat) line have more aggressive taper...or what kind of line/taper is more suitable for casting from a boat? I have a Loomis 9 wt Cross Current rod. Any suggestion would be appreciated! Thanks!
 

Richard E

Active Member
#4
a thirty foot section of T-14....or for your 9 wt, a 32 ft section of lc-13......
I'm going to agree and disagree with Jim, here . . . for your 9 wt, a 28 ft, no more than 30', piece of Cortland LC-13 would work great. I love that stuff. I prefer regular intermediate running line . . . it handles better for me.
 
#5
I've liked using a setup of Rio Slickshooter running line with Lc-13 for the sink tip. I'm also quite liking the Rio Leviathan fast sink lines.
 
#7
I use a Rio Leviathan. I have both fast sinking and intermediate but usually use the fast sinking line. The nine wt. seems a bit light to me as I have used a 12 wt. most often. The Tuna here run around 25 to 35 lbs and they are like hooking on to a freight train. They take numerous deep runs and take you deep into the backing several times. My reel is a Ross Momentum 8 with about 550 yards of backing plus the line.
 

yuhina

Tropical member
#8
COOL! Thanks a lot for all the great information! I think the fast sinking shooting head is a great idea... they should penetrate the wind better ... I agree the 9 weight rod probably is too light for the game, but since I haven't catch anything yet... so maybe wait until it broke and get a heavier one... : ) Thanks!
 
#9
Problem with the 9 wt is, it will take so long to land a tuna that if you're on a charter boat someone will volunteer to break your rod for you so everyone can get back to fishing.

I use a 12 wt with 30' of T-17.
 
#11
I've caught lots of skipjack on an 8wt. If the tuna you're after out there are anything like those, you'll be okay with a 9wt. But man... Can't say it wasn't tough as hell to do on an 8wt.
 

alpinetrout

Banned or Parked
#12
There's no one line to cover that spectrum. The conditions dictate the line more than the fish. I've caught various types of tuna on everything from poppers to deep-dredged flies and everything in between. An acre-sized boiling school of longtail tuna on micro-bait dictate the use of a floater or intermediate with small flies. Chumming for yellowfin requires sinking your fly down into the zone the fish are holding at. Bluefish are the same. In the same day, I've used floaters and fast-sinking shooting heads on bluefish as the conditions changed.

Evan - Black skipjack aren't tuna, they're bait. Joking aside, they're in the Euthynnus genus. Real tuna are Thunnus.
 
#13
I've caught lots of skipjack on an 8wt. If the tuna you're after out there are anything like those, you'll be okay with a 9wt. But man... Can't say it wasn't tough as hell to do on an 8wt.
Dude I caught a pile of skip Jack in Loreto and they had my 12 wt. bent nearly in half. They took only about two runs and 10 minutes but they can really tear up some gear.
 
#14
Dude I caught a pile of skip Jack in Loreto and they had my 12 wt. bent nearly in half. They took only about two runs and 10 minutes but they can really tear up some gear.
They're crazy for their size. They're one of those you get tired of after the first few (I think of them as the pink salmon of Baja). I've caught them on anything from an 8 to a 12, and they put the hurt on all those rods. Just have to figure out that the tail never, ever rests... So you just have to put the clamp down on them at some point.

I go for albacore tomorrow. That'll be a new experience in tuna entirely (yes Alpinetrout, REAL tuna)
 
#15
It seems you know my fishing ground very well?! Have you ever fished the east coast? or you just like to post this kind of teaser??
Out here we fish albacore that run 15 - 35 lbs. The first run is usually 150 yards, followed by a 45 minute pig pull. 10 weights are frowned on since it's not enough to get them to the boat.

I neglected to look at your location before I spoke, just assumed this was a local question, Washington board and all that. I just don't like being under gunned, it's like going to an axe fight with a Swiss army knife because you're confident with your technique.