September Pink Reports

#91
I very much disagree on that. This year, the big males fight HARD. I've put over 50 steelhead to hand this year, so I have something to compare to. I've had several pinks cartwheel, tailwalk, run to the backing, and be completely on FIRE and impossible to turn. Not every fish mind you, but more than enough to make it extremely fun.

I know it's not cool amongst the elite to say pinks are good for anything (food, fighting, etc), but I know for a fact they are good for something.
 
#92
I very much disagree on that. This year, the big males fight HARD. I've put over 50 steelhead to hand this year, so I have something to compare to. I've had several pinks cartwheel, tailwalk, run to the backing, and be completely on FIRE and impossible to turn. Not every fish mind you, but more than enough to make it extremely fun.

I know it's not cool amongst the elite to say pinks are good for anything (food, fighting, etc), but I know for a fact they are good for something.

I have to agree with Evan. Although I am not really targeting them, the few incidental pinks that I have caught this season have fought harder than in previous years. However, I am only speaking in regards to my own experience, which is limited in regards to the 2011 pink run.
 
#93
I would say they can be hard fighting. Got taken for a ride by one a few weeks ago. He pulled me in my kayak around pretty good. He was really god to me and pulled me right to the beach to be bleed and put on ice. Not even silvers pull me around that very often. to be fair it was a 8 LBS male so as big as an average coho.
Also had a 4 pound pink I would have sworn was a 15 pound Chinook until I got it in. Course it most likley was running for its life from a seal at the time because when I landed it, it had a set of teeth marks on it. Never did see any seals around at the time but?
As for eating I kind of like to eat Pinks either fresh cooked on the grill same day its caught or reheated and put into a seafood pasta.
 
#94
Pinks are great for many reasons:

Take people who have never fished and be able to have them land a salmon on gear or fly, especially kids
New fishermen (I like the ones who go and buy really expensive gear and than never use it again) . We all benefit from these guys/gals because we get to buy some of that gear for great discount
Brings extra $$ to the state, especially now when most of our cities are bankrupt
Definitely $$ for all the tackle/sporting good stores
Food for some
New friendship
All the discussions it brings to on every NW fishing forum; good and bad, it's better than TV.
 
#95
To each his own. Whether you like or dislike the Pink run is a personal matter and IMHO no one should knock anyone for enjoying the catching and eating if that's what they want to do. I for one have enjoyed the run over the past 8 or 10 years because it's close to home. It's smooth water and the fish do battle hard for the most part. I've had good jumpers and those that have wrapped me up in my motor. I've worn out my arm and shoulder on long days and I've had several skunk days where I lost fish without bringing others to hand. I'll continue the Pink fishing as long as I'm able. Now it's time to get down to Coho and SRC fishing for a while. I like that too and I'll see some of you out there, I'm sure.
 

PT

Physhicist
#96
I hope nobody here takes me too seriously. My motto.... If it'll take a fly and pull a bit it's good in my book. I don't care what it is. I've been known to train my dog with a 5 wt and pheasant wing. Strictly c n r there;)

I like the diversity in our area. Carp, bass, trout, salmon, etc. It keeps us all doing something different which spreads out the pressure. Can't beat that!
 

Flyfishing Dad

displaced Alaskan
#97
I only wish the four full days of vacation invested in attempting to catch the blasted pinks in the puyallup with my son would have been productive. Not one fish landed. Tried all the tricks and advice, but nothing. Had hoped to see my son land his first salmon before he heads off to college or university somewhere else. Didn't happen. With my work schedule I don't know if we'll get another shot at it this autumn. We are not pleased with the pinks. Truly envy you guys who talk about full limits and lots of fish landed.
 
#98
I'm not sure if you were juts using fly rods, but at some point I wold started using a Dick Nite with the fly rod or spinning. Sorry about the skunking.

I only wish the four full days of vacation invested in attempting to catch the blasted pinks in the puyallup with my son would have been productive. Not one fish landed. Tried all the tricks and advice, but nothing. Had hoped to see my son land his first salmon before he heads off to college or university somewhere else. Didn't happen. With my work schedule I don't know if we'll get another shot at it this autumn. We are not pleased with the pinks. Truly envy you guys who talk about full limits and lots of fish landed.
 
#99
Ditto to Patrick. I was up at the Stilly last weekend and burned my arm out with tendenitis try to get one of the hoard of pinks to bite. My only take was on a Wallmart jig and the hook broke. In 2009 at least 5 trips to Brown Point yeilded 1 inadvertently snagged fish. What am I doing wrong? I'm not the best fly fisherman but I'm not that bad.
 

Ian Broadie

Flyfishing is so "Metal"
"Dick Nite"? Sorry, doesn't register for me. I'm assuming it's a particular pattern?
A Dick Nite is a super light weight spoon.... it's meant to be used on spinning gear but if you swing it or slowly strip it on a fly rod it's super deadly.. Technically not fly fishing but it is still a fun way to fish and it can tell you a lot about the water you are fishing by how the spoon is fluttering in the current.
 
Hey Everyone,
I would like to introduce myself and start making some posts to this site. This seems like a relatively polite crowd! I've been having good luck fishing for pinks near the point at Golden Gardens.
As for the folks who have had trouble getting the pinks to bite, here are some tips that have worked for me:
1. slow down the retrieve.
2. pause longer between strips
3. use smaller flies (has anyone heard of the "handlebar"?
4. in rivers, i always keep moving until I find biters.
I've had plenty of fishless hours during the pink runs over the years, and some of the methods above have saved the day for me.
http://jameswfishingblog.blogspot.com/
 

JayB

Active Member
A test net (single net, but the bridge) was in when I launched in the Duwi this morning - but was gone by the time I left at 8:30. Still a fair number of fish there - cerise flashabou comet with fairly heavy ice, fished off of a floater on a long leader seemed to get the job done.
 
I only wish the four full days of vacation invested in attempting to catch the blasted pinks in the puyallup with my son would have been productive. Not one fish landed. Tried all the tricks and advice, but nothing. Had hoped to see my son land his first salmon before he heads off to college or university somewhere else. Didn't happen. With my work schedule I don't know if we'll get another shot at it this autumn. We are not pleased with the pinks. Truly envy you guys who talk about full limits and lots of fish landed.
From my experience, in the rivers, this year's pinks seem to prefer small (size 8) sparse flies with lots of flashabou and a very slow retrieve with intermittent twitches and a long leader/tippet. This run's pinks seem to be stronger fighters than the last run; almost comparable to chums.