Spey Nymphing Rig Set Up

John Hicks

Owner and operator of Sea Run Pursuits
#48
I love using the large phyllip rawley style indicators when i nymph. They are easily ajusted to whatever depth I want.
 
#49
I once watched two strippers go at it in a parking lot... and this thread bought back that memory. Do most of you guys who nymph high stick it or set up long drifts with stack mends etc? I prefer to stack mend and drift my junk 50' downstream or so, seems I can cover more water than a short high stick drift
 
#50
I guess beyond what has already been shared, why split shot over say using a heavier pattern and double rigging? Also, are glo bugs as effective as beads? And why one over the other? Never fished with anyone set up this way and I spend my time mainly swinging. When I have nymphed, it's been with a single hander with no success.
 
#51
I guess beyond what has already been shared, why split shot over say using a heavier pattern and double rigging? Also, are glo bugs as effective as beads? And why one over the other? Never fished with anyone set up this way and I spend my time mainly swinging. When I have nymphed, it's been with a single hander with no success.
I don't use split shot, it's not usually quite enough without snapping on 5 of them, and it causes you to snag easily. I prefer Hairline Dubbin tungsten putty.

The extra weight is necessary to get your stuff down in the zone. Often times, you have only a few feet of drift before you hit the "zone" where the fish lies. If you're not on their level, you're wasting your time. So adequate weight, and proper mending are necessary to get the right presentation. It's tough in a lot of scenarios, and I still struggle with it in certain places.

I never have used glo bugs, but seeing how slight variations in bead color can make all the difference, I'd say that they may not work the same.
 
#52
If you are using a heavy pattern skip the split shot, it really depends on how vertical you want your presentation. I like to run a weighted glo bug in place of a bead. I have noticed coho won't touch beads but they love the weighted glo bugs.
 
#53
If you are using a heavy pattern skip the split shot, it really depends on how vertical you want your presentation. I like to run a weighted glo bug in place of a bead. I have noticed coho won't touch beads but they love the weighted glo bugs.
Sometimes a weighted fly is enough. But there are certain currents that won't allow it to get down very well without some extra help; especially when you're working behind boulders and what not.

You can run a static drift, which is more like a bobber-jig gear presentation. This is more "vertical" of a presentation, with a lot of weight holding the fly/bead/dirty awesomeness straight down from the bobber.

The other way is a more dynamic drift, where your presentation is more "fluttering" in the current. Usually best in low/clear water. Requires less weight, and you're not usually fishing directly under your indicator.
 
#54
I almost always run a splitshot at my leader/tippet junction along with a weighted fly and bead if I'm feeling really dirty. Works pretty good for me. Probably back to swinging now that we have some more water to play in.
 
#55
the reason i run split is to keep the entire leader under the indicator riding as close as 90 degrees as possible.

from left to right. wieghted top fly, bead, and split

weighted fly and bead no split

weighted fly and globug

just a weighted fly

 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#57
I love the high emotional content of threads like this for the entertainment value. Fortunately in the midst of it all the original poster's questions appear to have been well answered.

Personally I'm a non-expert but not quite a newb at nymphing. My lifetime stream nymphing total now amounts to one whitefish, one rainbow trout, two sea run cutthroat, and a few steelhead. However I've observed enough of nymphing to have formed an opinion that it is, or can be, significantly different from using a bobber and jig with a spinning or casting rod. And it's one of those distinctions with a difference when it comes to catching fish sometimes.

Evan touches on it in his post #53 above. I don't know if the terms he uses, static and dynamic drift are the best choices, but I think they serve well enough for the purpose. The static drift is what you usually get with a jig and a bobber, especially since a lot of anglers use heavier jigs than necessary for the water conditions. The dynamic drift, with lighter leaders constructed specifically for the water conditions, and use of the minimum weight necessary to put the nymph in the zone, delivers more lifelike or natural presentations. I think it's this latter presentation that makes it possible for skilled nymphers to accumulate some astounding catch numbers, even out-fishing gear guys under some conditions.

Nymphs that simulate natural insect drift get eaten over those that don't. It ought to follow that nymphs, glo bugs, and beads that simulate natural drift instead of looking like they're attached to a string, will get eaten more often than those that don't.

Although I don't nymph much, I still intend to develop that skill, mainly to become a more complete angler, and because the trout aren't always rising to dries, and not all steelhead hold in water suited to the swing. But I'll continue to mostly swing flies, because it was the only legal fly fishing method when I began fishing the fly only water on the NF Stilly and Kalama (no weighted flies or weight on leader was allowed), so I've always done it and am good enough to be confident with it.

Sg
 
#58
I thank everyone for their insight and tactics that they employ to answer my question. After reviewing all these posts, I think the conclusion is to accommodate a set-up and rig that fits your personal style of fishing and use whatever helps you catch fish. I have learned several tips for a nymphing set up for a Spey set up if I ever decide to nymph with my spey rod again. I think for now I will stick with my switch rod 10'8 '' for dead drifting a nymph.

A side comment: collectively, with all the members in this forum and years of experience, hours on the water, and with experience using probably every rod, reel, and fly line made in the last 40+ years, we should use this info to learn how to make us better anglers. Disagreements and differences in philosophies and beliefs of what fly fishing constitutes will always happen. Let's try to keep it civil though. I personally learn a lot from these posts and try to adapt methodology into my repertoire of skills. So I thank those who responded constructively.

From the east,


Mike Brigano
 

bconrad

Active Member
#60
Any of you guys fish nymphs/globugs without an indicator? I've done gear float fishing and indicator fishing pretty minimally, but to me they feel similar. Take the flotation off and it's a whole different game in some aspects but the concept remains the same. I fish the same line for glo bugs and dry flies...Delta.