To wax or not to wax

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#34
I only tried wax once. Made me scream like a girl when I ripped that stuff off. Who in the hell would want to do that again?
Two admissions against self interest there Scott:
  1. You screamed like a girl - no one asked if anyone ever screamed like a girl
  2. You waxed yourself and admitted to it - no one asked if you waxed yourself, we were talking about flies
Now that you've properly redirected this thread into some sort of deviant direction, how'd that Brazillian Buns wax job work for you?
 
#35
Well, the last few posts have distracted me from the serious subject of fly tying waxes. We could continue with a discussion of Brazilian waxing , "Hollywood Wax", landing strips etc., but I think we should go back to fly tying wax.

As suggested earlier, I tried some glue stick stuff today (kids wax) ON MY THREAD and it seemed to work fine. Certainly an inexpensive alternative to specific fly tying wax. As for myself, I will continue to wax MY THREAD as I have done for years. I guess it is part of the ritual or process of tying. Lord knows I have enough wax now to last a few tiers lifetimes with enough left over to do a few floors and yes perhaps even a few Brazilians.
Jackd
 
#36
I usually only wax my thread when I'm using Pearsall's silk. I use a dark cobbler's wax to alter the color of the thread and adding the wax lets the thread grab the hook and materials better. I also use a wax similar to the wax used by Leisenring to both color the thread a bit and make it just a bit stuckier for dubbing.

As for Overton's, the closest I've found is BT's Tacky and Super Tacky waxes. Great for touch dubbing.

REE
Ditto

My dark cobbler's wax comes from a stick made for waxing bagpipes I am led to believe it's one and the same.

Sometimes I do use Dilly Wax on thread to help with dubbing deer hair.

:)
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#38
Back then I didn't know SWIX came in different colors. I had problems with dubbed bodies back then. I think I was playing with something hard like rabbit and needed a tacky wax to help spin it on. You know how tough rabbit is to noodle on thread.
 
#39
Ditto

My dark cobbler's wax comes from a stick made for waxing bagpipes I am led to believe it's one and the same.

Sometimes I do use Dilly Wax on thread to help with dubbing deer hair.

:)
The dark cobblers wax is used on the bagpipe joints. It is mostly pitch. I too use it to darken Pearsalls. Say, what is DILLY wax? That's a new one for me?
Thanks, Jackd
 
#42
I just looked up Dilly wax. It is a fly floatant. Never saw it before.
It is sold as a fly floatant and works well for that purpose however I use it especially for a Deer Hair dub for some large sedge patterns and it holds the dubbing surprisingly well against other forms - it also helpss the sedge to float that little bit longer.

Hope that helps.
 
#43
Thanks Loopy. I will get some Dilly Wax and give a try. I see it is made by FLY RITE. I didn't think that company was still around. Probably over 30 years in business.
I wonder if it has any silicone??? as most of the floatants do???
It is sold as a fly floatant and works well for that purpose however I use it especially for a Deer Hair dub for some large sedge patterns and it holds the dubbing surprisingly well against other forms - it also helpss the sedge to float that little bit longer.

Hope that helps.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#44
I started out using wax and dubbing loops, but I've subsequently found that for most of the smaller size flies (which I tend to tie 8-20), I really do not need either to get the build-up and profile desired. This is particularly true when using dubbing like Natures Spirit which, unlike natural guard hairs, are much easier to wind to thread. I also find wax tends to mat down the build up and look less natural.
 
#45
With the mention of "smell" by Jim Wallace when talking about the surfers wax, an entirely different subject/concern comes to mind. With all the things we use today in fly tying like epoxy, super glue, modern wax preparations (oil based), and certain man made materials, I wonder what the fish can smell? Fish do have a super acute sense of smell. I do think about it as I have begun to use super glue a lot in my fishing flies. It does make em last longer. I guess the smell disappears as it cures but I wonder??? I stopped using moth balls because of the smell which seemed to last a long time.
I too has wondered about the smell of things. Bee's wax has a very sweet smell. Wonder if that could be construed
as an attractant? Some of the glues and adhesives not so much, but a strong odor. I have no experience with the
UV cured adhesives. Perhaps someone with more savvy understanding of these things could jump in and enlighten us on the subject.