Another leech pattern for lakes

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#31
You are correct, my patterns do edge more on the side of bait fish not leeches and in away that's what I was going for.

As for steel, I suppose, but these will stay in my lake boxes and out of my steel boxes.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#32
Irafly, I'd be tempted to use that white and red one for searun cutts in my local estuary and tidal creeks. They wouldn't care whether it represented a leech or a baitfish. They'd just eat it.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#33
Blue, I love that leech of yours. Looks a lot like that real one in the other pic.
Looks like you might have palmered the marabou over some body material, but I can't really see for sure.
My ears perked up when you mentioned that it was an easy tie.
 

Blue

Active Member
#34
Thanks Jim, but just two Marabou tips wrapped softhackle style on the front of the hook by the eye. The hook is bare. I have added dubbing/chenille to the hook (Polar Chenille is awesome) to create a thicker body more baitfish look

(without chenille and bottom with Polar Chenille)
 
#35
Here is another simple leech which uses otherwise discarded materials- pheasant philo flumes left over from tying six packs.

Hook: 3x long nymph
Bead: red glass
tail: marabou
body: olive pheasant Philo plumes reinforced with wire.

This fly is somewhat delicate even with the wire, but it looks great in the water and fish like it.
 
#36
Here is another simple leech which uses otherwise discarded materials- pheasant philo flumes left over from tying six packs.

Hook: 3x long nymph
Bead: red glass
tail: marabou
body: olive pheasant Philo plumes reinforced with wire.

This fly is somewhat delicate even with the wire, but it looks great in the water and fish like it.
Very nice. I tie something similar but load the philoplumes into a dubbing loop creating a "chenille" of sorts that also reinforces the fly.

View attachment 48601 View attachment 48632
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#38
Ha ha. Me too. I've dubbed some bodies on dries, like comparaduns, but I need to get over my laziness-based reluctance to use this technique and get better at it.

I really need to learn to use a dubbbing loop
Troutpocket, that dubbed leech looks deadly!
I need to get some red beads, too like on thesankers' leech. In fact, I need to get a whole collection of glass beads!

Now I have a huge backlog of patterns that I want to tie. The head spins!
 

Drifter

Active Member
#40
Same way I do it. I always used my hackle pliers for the dubbing loop and hated the time it takes to do it. then I bought the dubbing tool or "hook" and found it much easier, the thing I would add is that I bought the longer version and should of bought a shorter version which would make the tool much easier to work with. Mine is as long as my gluing needle. I really don't like using to many tools just takes more time to switch back and forth, but there's no argument that a dubbing loop does the best job when dubbing! His tool was cool but the plain dubbing hook is all I use.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#41
Thanks for the link to the vid, Blue. I just have a basic Griffin clamp-on vise. Holds hooks fine, but doesn't rotate. So far, my dubbing loops have been short, mainly tying #14 and #12 dries. I still have to use both hands to wrap, doing the hand-off each wrap.

Bobbin hanging down from near the hook eye has always been a problem for me, getting in the way. Its easy to see how I can make a separate bobbin holder easily enough (on a weighted stand) so as to keep my bobbin out of the way while I'm wrapping the loop. I won't have that little extension bar (on the rotary vise in the vid) in the way to hinder my hand-offs.

One of these days I should get a rotary vise!
 
#42
Thanks for the link to the vid, Blue. I just have a basic Griffin clamp-on vise. Holds hooks fine, but doesn't rotate. So far, my dubbing loops have been short, mainly tying #14 and #12 dries. I still have to use both hands to wrap, doing the hand-off each wrap.

Bobbin hanging down from near the hook eye has always been a problem for me, getting in the way. Its easy to see how I can make a separate bobbin holder easily enough (on a weighted stand) so as to keep my bobbin out of the way while I'm wrapping the loop. I won't have that little extension bar (on the rotary vise in the vid) in the way to hinder my hand-offs.

One of these days I should get a rotary vise!
Honestly, making dubbing loops is the reason I use the rotary function of my vise. Other than that, almost everything I do could be accomplished just as easily on any vise. . . .but I do a lot of dubbing loops!!
 

Blue

Active Member
#43
Honestly, making dubbing loops is the reason I use the rotary function of my vise. Other than that, almost everything I do could be accomplished just as easily on any vise. . . .but I do a lot of dubbing loops!!

Absolutely. Me too. That is why I suggest rotary to newbies. Because you can do both. I like the dubbing loop tool that looks like a wire W...;-)
 
#44
Thanks for the link to the vid, Blue. I just have a basic Griffin clamp-on vise. Holds hooks fine, but doesn't rotate. So far, my dubbing loops have been short, mainly tying #14 and #12 dries. I still have to use both hands to wrap, doing the hand-off each wrap.

Bobbin hanging down from near the hook eye has always been a problem for me, getting in the way. Its easy to see how I can make a separate bobbin holder easily enough (on a weighted stand) so as to keep my bobbin out of the way while I'm wrapping the loop. I won't have that little extension bar (on the rotary vise in the vid) in the way to hinder my hand-offs.

One of these days I should get a rotary vise!

I have a nasty time with dubbing. Most wends up on the floor and my dog tracks in the house much to the sergrein of the wife. I've looked at a few you-tubes but all seems magic to me. Best I can do is rap a few turns around the dumbbell eyes of my signature series Redheaded Winged Splat.
 
#45
Thanks for the link Blue. I watched it several times and decided it didn't look too hard so I went to the fly shop and picked up a dubbing loop tool, along with some more dubbings. I couldn't find any wax there or at Walmart, so I haven't used any yet. Got home and played around with it a bit. The loop itself is pretty simple and I can tell I will be using this technique more and more. I was playing around trying to achieve something along the lines of a Hale Bopp but couldn't get my body to look..... "straggly" enough? My body keeps looking way too tight, not all hairy like those nice leech patterns look. I've tried picking the dubbing out some, but didn't have any velcro sitting around the house to do it like the video. Not sure if I'm using the wrong kind of dubbing, or just need to tweak my technique a bit.



This vid is how I do the dubbing loop
http://youtu.be/Zh6TwdQlNhw

The way he ties the starting loop (wrapping around it before he starts) off is very important.
 

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