Trout Streams

#16
Welcome aboard mate.
Get yourself a #2 or #3 wt rod and even the little fish can feel big.
Some of my favorite waters produce only little fish, a big one might be 10".
 
#17
Welcome aboard mate.
Get yourself a #2 or #3 wt rod and even the little fish can feel big.
Some of my favorite waters produce only little fish, a big one might be 10".
Truly a man after my own heart - This is still my favorite kind of fly fishing. Hiking in the headwaters with a 2-3 wt, nobody else in sight, just exploring and seeing if there are any fish. Some of my fondest fly fishing memories are these kinds of days.
 
#18
If you are into walking/biking, and live in Seattle, you might want to bike the Cedar River trail down in Renton. There are numerous streets, parks, and pull-outs in Renton and along the Maple Valley Highway where you can park you car and either bike or walk the trail, which for the most part is within sight of the river. The trail continues all the way to the Cedar River Watershed at Landsburg Road.

Various state and non-profit organizations have put some effort into trout habitat on the Cedar - in terms of secret spots, just look for obvious trails off through the blackberries. The water is really high right now, but there's lots of pretty obvious water that hold fish. It's definitely an urban fishery, but with minimal walking/wading/bush-wacking you can get away from the float, swim and beer crowd.

Walking/biking the Cedar River trail itself is a quite nice way to spend an afternoon scouting the river. It really changes year to year as logjams come and go - I'm looking forward to fishing it come June.
 
#23
Jim 2 years ago you would offer some advice on the finer points of map reading along with an actual honey hole like the forks to get a fellow angler underway. Now it's an outing in hell. Are you getting soft in your old age? :)
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#25
Jim 2 years ago you would offer some advice on the finer points of map reading along with an actual honey hole like the forks to get a fellow angler underway. Now it's an outing in hell. Are you getting soft in your old age? :)
Got my hands slapped to many times. I decided to be a nice guy and keep my mouth shut.

I spent oodles of money on gas to find all I found in Washington. To many want the easy way and want to be pointed to them places. All it takes is pouring over a map at the blue squiggly lines. Some times you have to beat your way through Blackberry's and Devils Club or climb down a cliff to find it all. To me it was all worth it as I found many places to fish. Of course I was a lot younger then and all that crawling around was fun.

Here in Montana I don't have to do any of that. I drive to where I want to fish, park my truck, walk ten paces, and fish and catch fish. For somebody with bad wheels, this is a dream world.
 

tinman207

Active Member
#30
Go explore the Snoqualmie Forks, the Cedar from Landsburg to Lake Washington, and then pick one bigger S river from upper tribs down to the salt. It took me a few years to do that, and it gave me a profound understanding of PNW watersheds, NW trout habitat, entomology, and the vast differences in stream system structures. I found many awesome secret spots, but can also discern fishy blue lines on a map much better now.