Eastside drift boat repair

GoDeep

"Fish hard and fish often"
#1
I have recently purchased an older fiberglass Eastside drift boat that is great shape, other than the wood rails around the edges of the boat. I will need. To replace the railings soon since there is some rotting and its starting to come loose. Does anyone have experience with this sort of project? What kind of wood should I use? Is there a company in the Puget Sound area that could do a project like this at an affordable price? This is my first drift boat and I don't have much wood working skills. Thanks for any advice you have!
 
#2
You might want to try Island boat shop in Port Townsend. It's a shop that specializes in classic fiberglass boats and does wood also. It's an easy project so you might also think about finding a student from the Northwest school of wooden boat building.

I do wood boat building and repair to wooden parts of glass boats, but I'm in Ellensburg. PM me if you think might want to haul it over here.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#3
You wouldn't be the guy who has the drift boat cover that bolts on to make it a closed bow?

Since you only have to do wood, there's probably a few avenues you can go. Most woodworkers in your area could help you. But Nomslander on here can steer you in the right direction possibly. :)

BTW, I have 2 Eastsides. :)
 

GoDeep

"Fish hard and fish often"
#4
Jerry,
No, I don't have the cover for the bow. This is my first drift boat and I love it. Once I get the wood changed out it's going to look frickin sharp!
 

Angler 77

AKA Scott Jones
#7
Several types of wood that would be suitable and many available in lengths that would make it doable without a scarf. White Oak, Ash, Purpleheart, Fir, Larch, Sapele and more. Upsides and downsides to all of them, try Edensaw in Port Townsend to get pricing and availability.

If you decide that you shouldn't do the job, give me a shout I can put you in contact with folks who can do the job. You would need to bring the boat to PT, more than likely.
 
#11
I first tried some beautiful straight grain Mahogany, but after breaking six rails and causing GoDeep to miss some sweet fishing on Saturday I switched to Oak. It looks good and bends a hell of a lot easier.
 

Jim Wheeler

Full time single dad and pram builder
#12
Keep up on oak. Not a very good gunwale material. I switched from Oak to Eastern ash many years ago. Oak mildews very easily, darkens quickly, the grain rasies and the gunwales never look as good after the first oiling.
 
#13
Oak does have it's problems,but I've seem Beetle Cat sailboats in New England with 50-60 year old oak rails that are in good shape. The key with oak is to take care of it. Keep it oiled or varnished, keep it dry and out of the sun and it'll look good for many years.

This particular boat lives in a dry climate and has a cover so it should be good.
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#14
Yeah, I'd go with ash as well. Patrick, that's a really nice job you did! One thing I learned working on the teak on my Catalina, that Epiphanes varnish, supposed to be so wonderful, it's crap. The stuff crazed and flaked off in a few months. Looked absolutely gorgeous new, but I began to see deterioration within weeks! If you covered every inch of it except when you're under way, it might last a season.
 
#15
Yeah, I'd go with ash as well. Patrick, that's a really nice job you did! One thing I learned working on the teak on my Catalina, that Epiphanes varnish, supposed to be so wonderful, it's crap. The stuff crazed and flaked off in a few months. Looked absolutely gorgeous new, but I began to see deterioration within weeks! If you covered every inch of it except when you're under way, it might last a season.
Epiphanes is good, and used on many a prize winning Mahogany speedboats. It's thick and not that easy to use if you don't make a living varnishing, but still good stuff. It lasts much longer in the NW than in areas with more sun. More pros use Z-Spar Flagship. In the last restoration shop I worked in the crew was evenly split between the two. Flagship is probably the most UV stabilized varnish out there, but is also thick and not easy for the casual varnisher. Teak is just difficult to get varnish to adhere to. It's a great wood to not use any finish on or just some oil now and then. It's best property is how easy it is to refinish.
 

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