Well, I've got my vise and tools....now what???

mcoomer

Active Member
I think the topic says it all. I've just wrapped up a Renzetti Traveller vise and a set of Dr. Slick tools. I got two ceramic bobbins, two whip finishers, hair stacker, bobbin threader, two tweezers, bodkin, three different scissors, hemos, and a dubbing tool. As near as I can figure I saved myself about $60 or more compared to what it would have cost me at the local fly shop. Thanks Ebay.

Now for the other stuff. Materials and consumables are next on my list. I want to tie steelhead patterns, streamers, leeches, buggers and such. I'm going to stay away from small dry patterns and more intricate stuff for now, so tell me what you folks would recommend for hooks, materials, consumables (laquers, cements, etc.), and threads, tinsel, and wire.

Essentially, any advice that you want to impart is greatly appreciated. I can't wait to get outfitted so I can ugly up a few hooks.

Thanx,
Mike
 

mike doughty

Honorary Member
various colrs of marabous, chenneils, calf tails for wings and various hackles. with this combonation you can tie a lot of the basic steelhead flies.
 

ceviche

Active Member
In marabous, get wine, black, brown, dark and light olive, red, and purple. Also, get the same colors in schlappen. This way, you can make the best buggers, since schlappen rules. Marabou leeches, made by tying clumps of barbs to a very long shank hook, are the easiest type of leech pattern to make--and are very deadly. Purple is a very good deep-water color.

Speaking of... Hey, I'm gonna try out a purple marabou and schlappen pattern for Pass Lake today. I just hope the water temp hasn't gone completely through the roof, yet. :eek:
 

Lex Story

Angler, Gastronomist, Artist, Jarhead, Geek
Correction, it's:

"All About The Fly" in Monroe

just trying to avoid misdirection or confusion. I'm not trying to be a chucklehead.
 

IveofIone

WFF Supporter
Well Mike, welcome to the world of Insect Impersonation. Since you are just getting started and no one is nearby to correct your mistakes let me shout a few words of caution your way in an effort to keep you in line:

PINCH THAT BARB BEFORE YOU START

TOO MUCH DUBBING

TIE THAT TAIL IN FARTHER FORWARD AND AVOID THAT BIG HUMP AT THE REAR

WHAT ARE YOU USING-CARPET THREAD? DON'T YOU HAVE ANY 8/0?

STOP CROWDING THE EYE, LEAVE SOME ROOM FOR THE HEAD

THE HEAD IS 1/4 OF THE LENGTH OF THE FLY, WRAP CLOSER TO THE EYE.

THIS LOOKS LIKE #12 HACKLE ON A #16 HOOK

I'VE SEEN KANGAROO RATS WITH A SHORTER TAIL

WOW! IS THIS FLY OVERDRESSED OR WHAT? WERE YOU GOING TO WEAR IT FOR MARDI GRAS?

Seriously though taking a class or just getting together to tie with some experts will cut the learning curve way down and help you avoid some rookie mistakes. Proportion is probably the hardest thing to learn in fly tying and once you get that down you can usually do no wrong. Good luck and many happy hours at the bench. Ive
 

lcconrad

New Member
There are lots of good books on fly tying I like Skip Morris's he teaches some very easy techniques. But the best thing you can do for yourself is take a class. Most fly shops teach fly tying. I would head to either "All About the Fly" in MOnroe or to "Avid Angler" in Lake Forrest Park. Both places will set you up and provide quality instruction and materials. You avoid many mistakes and problems by getting some quality instruction to begin with.
 

Salmon Candy

Active Member
Where do you live? I'm in Bellevue and would be happy to spend some time with you going through hooks, materials, patterns and such if you're from around here. Email me at [email protected] or call my office at 425.990.8800.
 

BOBLAWLESS

New Member
When no one is looking, here's what you do:

Wrap the hook with thread no lighter than 6/0.
Put on a tail, not too much, not too thick.
Tie down some chenille near the butt.
Wrap this forward to about 2/3 of the body.
Tie this down with your working thread which you wrapped forward before you started the chenille.
Chose a mellow hackle. Tie in one end and then spin the rest around the shank until you see something you like,
Tie this off and trim.
Make a nice knot and cut. Now put a little liquid nails on for cheap head cement.

This fly will take trout. Believe in it. Maybe some wings? Maybe palmer the body? Maybe dub instead of chenille? Ah!, my boy, the delights that await!

Bob the, if I didn't tie flies, they'd have to tie me.:professor
 

ceviche

Active Member
Mike,

"I'm going to stay away from small dry patterns and more intricate stuff for now"

Don't be afraid of small patterns and dry flies. You can make yourself some soft hackle spiders, which can be fished as either an emerger or as a wet. They really aren't that difficult to make. Floss body, hare mask fur dubbing for the thorax, and two turns of partridge for the hackle. Just leave enough room behind the hook eye for the head and the whip-finish. Even tiny patterns are do-able. I've heard of soft-hackle spiders even being used to imitate mayflies, though these are normally employed to imitate emerging caddis flies.

On the Yakima River, there is this late-Fall/early-winter hatch of some kind of insect. I actually have seen the insect emerge, though, to this day I still don't know what it is. It's best imitated with a spider tied with an orange floss body and grizzly hackle. Size 16 or smaller. From what I've heard, this is that "mystery winter hatch" on the Yak.

I'm not that proficient of a tier, but spiders are not that difficult. And even CDC feathers can make doing smaller dries accessible. The two-feather fly is a dream-come-true. :beer2
 

mcoomer

Active Member
I guess that I shouldn't say that I'm going to avoid dry flies altogether. I say that only because I intend to start with what I perceive to be larger easier patterns to tie. Once I have gained some knowledge and skill I'm sure I'll give it a try.

Thanks,
Mike
 

Zen Piscator

Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.
Alright, i dont paticularily like the people that run this site im gonna give u, but the person who wrote thier begning fly tying section did an amazing job. Follow all of his advice, and email him if u have any questions. His name is Al Campbell, and he is a genious.

http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytying/beginners/

i am not trying to premote this site, nor am i affliated with Al, i just think he does an amazing job of teaching tying.
 

Randy Diefert

aka: Longears
I agree with you, I don't particularly like them either but, this is good info for the beginner to get their feet heading in the right direction. I went to several of Gill Nyerges' classes here on Whidbey Island but, you ought to be able to find some classes on the other side of the pond. Join a club , meet people and learn. Most clubs have guys who like to sit around with a small group and tie and shoot the breeze... Longears:beer2
 

dude_1967

Chris
Mike,

from your other posts, I can see you're interested in also keeping the costs low. You might consider getting your hooks from this guy: http://www.thefishguy.net/ in particular the hooks at http://www.thefishguy.net/hooks.htm

Great prices and good service. I believe that the guy deals in factory direct hooks of Japanese origin.

Sounds like you need the streamer 4X hooks and the salmon hooks, maybe also take a look at the salt water hooks.

Good luck with your tying. Chris.
 

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