Nikon Photographers sound off

porterHause

Just call me Jon
#16
I rarely if ever case it, no lens caps, use it the rain, dust, fishing, hunting, heat, cold you name it. Still ticking and taking great photos by my standards.
Reasons why I love my Nikon. The top end lenses are weather sealed as well.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#17
I am far from any authority on camera or their good use. I can testify that for the workhorse, hardiness and quality of the Nikon D60 I have owned for the past four years. It rides shotgun in the front seat of the truck most days, I have shot ten of thousands of frames, I rarely if ever case it, no lens caps, use it the rain, dust, fishing, hunting, heat, cold you name it. Still ticking and taking great photos by my standards. I am sure all the other Nikons are equally as hardy.

Good snapping regards,
I love this. It reminded me of a pic I saw on a photog board shown below. Apparently this camera was owned by a pro and had no less than 400,000 clicks. Not a Nikon or a DSLR but it shows these things are tough.
 
#19
Best Christmas present I ever bought my wife was our Nikon D50 DSLR. I later picked up a used Nikon AF Nikkon 70-300mm lens and I've been using it ever since :p. She wanted the camera but never uses it but I love taking it out for landscapes and wildlife photography. The thing takes great pics at the kids soccer games too. I could have kicked myself in the ass last may when I was on a business trip to Jackson Hole, Wy and I brought the camera but decided to leave the longer lens at home. That was the trip that I ended up seeing two different groups of grizzly sows with cubs. :eek:
 
#20
I am no expert either, I own a D7000 and a D700. The biggest investment you will make is in your lenses. I have a DX18-200mm lenses that I use with the D7000 that is sealed. That is another thing not all Nikons are sealed from the elements. I am pretty sure that the Nikon's from the D7000 up are sealed. I saw a great deal on a D7000 and the DX 18-200mm lenses as a package for about $1200 at B&H Photo, I am sure it has been marked down because the D7100 is out. Make sure you get a USA Nikon camera and lenses, not imports. This is important for warranty in the US. The D7000 is a fantastic camera, and that lenses is perfect for just about everything. I am trying to go semi-pro here with the D700 and am getting lenses for it, which are almost as much as the camera. I would cry if I dropped one of them when I was fishing, so I won't be taking that to the water. But the D7000 will be perfect. Good luck!
 
#21
Wow, cool to see that people still read this.
I have my 3100 and I love it!! I have been waiting to take it outside until the weather got better, so I am almost ready.
So far it has taken great pictures of our new son, a cousins wedding reception, other bits and things here and there, and one race weekend. It takes great pictures, and I am learning more about it everytime I take it out.
So far my favorite is being able to get the moving water shots, and the pictures I got from my race weekend with panning looked un real!
I did get the kit 18-55 lens, and that works pretty good so far. I would like to get the next step up lens once I am done blowing money on the wifes new car, and can save up a bit.
 
#22
I own a D7000 and it's a pretty tough camera for a digital. It takes great pics. I also own a 5100 and it is a great camera too.
I've used the 3100 also and I agree with porterHause and would go to the 5100 instead of 3100.
 

joellirot

Active Member
#25
I have a d80 an love it. i'm thinking of moving to something that shoots video as well. is shoot video with the iphone - but need some better quality - and being able to use my lenses would be awesome.

which body should i move to?...
 

creekx

spent spinner
#26
I have a d80 an love it. i'm thinking of moving to something that shoots video as well. is shoot video with the iphone - but need some better quality - and being able to use my lenses would be awesome.

which body should i move to?...
One thing to keep in mind regarding DSLR video is that they require a much different approach and more patience than a standard HD camcorder. The video is typically high quality, but they are anything but point-and-shoot. I've found that with my D7000 manual focus is often necessary, and that is difficult for me when looking at an LCD screen (the viewfinder does not work as the mirror is locked up for video mode.)

That said, the best part of DSLR video is the ability to use different lenses. For example, with a fast lens you can shoot with a low depth-of-field and achieve artistic, cinematic effects that are impossible with a traditional camcorder.

There is a ton of info available on the web re: DSLR video, focusing, etc.

Tight Lines!